Taekwondo

    • 4
    Taekwondo KO's in MMA
    Taekwondo In Action
      • 1
      Will - Black Belt Wiki I know that the video is supposed to show KOs but I am amazed that the "victims" of these tornado kicks just stand there and watch the spin vs. moving in and jamming the kick.
      • 1
      Ray The axe kick was fierce. A favorite kick to watch. Sadly I can not throw it effectively.
      • 1
      Christopher Adamchek Good tornado kicks
    • 8 more comments
    • 4
    Gotta make a manual
    O.K so it's fallen to me to come up with a student manual. It was a smaller club up until this sept when we moved to our own location and started advertising more and got ofc help. Before that it was mostly verbal instruction with the instructor just printing some things off from his TKD "bible". Our numbers went from under 20 to over 50 so we need to get a manual out to the kids now (been long time coming but had to take care of other growing pains as well). When I started I put together my own manual for myself and my son that took aspects of what he had and what I found online (this site helping bigtime) So now it's up to me to come up with a manual. Just figured I'd put it out there what are some ideas for sections, or neat things for manuals. I have all the info I need on the meat and bones (patterns, stances etc) looking more for ideas to make the manual stand out a little and maybe actually get read by students lol. I'm already compiling quotes for each page, using people like Bruce lee AND Kung Fu Panda lol. gonna include basics like history, theory, club rules etc. It's a manual for an ICTF Taekwon Do club Thanks in advance.
      • 2
      Hermit Yep, just finishing up the last pages of mine so far (1st draft anyway). I'm over 80 pgs, and by the time I'm done I anticipate almost 100 (double sided, so 50 pgs of paper). Been a lot of work so far, and while I have a lot of "fat" I could trim off if needed, it's all the stuff I included hoping to make the manual a little more enjoyable to read and not totally dry!! Deffinitly a lot of photos and some of that is not easy to find. Found that is what took a lot of time, wading through the internet trying to find good photos and diagrams. A lot of the stuff out there is all video now (especially patterns). I found it enjoyable though, and learned a lot from doing it so far, hopefully it's all correct, lol (I spent a lot of time to verify the info). I tried to include a lot of the Korean terminology, man that was tough due to all the different spelling and pronouncation.
      So far my catagories are: Intro, history, club info, rules and ettiquate, theory(oaths, tenants, theory of power, syne wave, etc), gear, stances, strikes and blocks, patterns (up to black belt), sparring, and glossary. A lot of info to go through, but the manual will be worth it, I think.
      • 2
      Ben Our manual starts with a history of our lineage, then a section on the history and legends of Shao-lin, followed by requirements, notes on some of our forms, and finally quotes for inspiration.

      It works pretty well, as you can read it for information, or for fun (Chinese myths are very interesting IMO).

      If I may make a suggestion though, maybe putting it in or making it compatible with a three ring binder would be something I'd have liked in ours. I got it punched and put in one and then can add my notes from new forms right in and not have another separate (and loseable) binder.
      • 1
      Rachel DS [171807,Andy] Sorry not available online. About to be printed and distributed internally to our students first. My aim would be for the actual style manual I am now starting on to be made accessible as a kindle book and hard copy. It's complicated though since even though I helped compile / compose / edit the manual, the style is not my intellectual property. That said however, [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki] I can share what I wrote and compiled about Hai and Osu (taken from my dojo etiquette section) as that is indeed generic:

      THE USE OF "HAI!" and "OSU!"
      Apart from bowing, you will also notice people say "Hai!" (literally: "yes") and "Osu!" a lot during class. "Hai!" is typically used to mean: "Yes, I heard", "Yes, I understood" or "Yes, I will try hard". "Osu!" can be used to convey these same meanings, but is also used as a greeting, and as a sign of respect (e.g., when bowing to someone). The difference is primarily regional, with Okinawan dojo preferring "Hai" and Japanese dojo preferring "Osu". See glossary for further information of the origin and meanings of "Osu".

      And in my glossary section the following on Osu:
      Use: Greeting / to acknowledge you have heard / you understand and will try hard
      Note: Osu is a contraction of two Japanese words: Osae - push / press, and Shinobu - patience / perseverance / determination.

      36 pages is because I only LISTED the kata rather than giving step by step instructions. We have about 44 kata in our system of which I have learned less than half. The next part of the project will be to get them all down correctly - I have been documenting all the ones I have learned so far and it's a bit of an undertaking. I like to be very precise with language. Also getting things concise in general is something I have to do at work. Although this was harder the principles were the same.

      And Andy.....I am sorry I missed the animal jokes :(

      Rachel
    • 24 more comments
    • 3
    Hello
    Hello to all. I have been watching my 7 year old granddaughter taking lessons. In a year she has earned the rank of yellow belt. She loves Taekwondo, and I have some mixed fighting taught in the Military many years ago. I would like to learn more of the Taekwondo forms. P.S. I am 75 years old retired U.S. Navy.
      • 1
      Hermit Welcome to TKD!! So make sure you get the info from your Granddaughter's school on what disciple of TKD she is in, the 2 main ones are WTF and ITF, and they are very different. WTF follows the taegeuk forms and ITF follows General Choi's patterns (and each will argue that they are better, I tend to think that WTF teaches better kicking but ITF is better well rounded, just my opinion). From there be aware that no matter what you find online, there may be small differences from school to school, online is great learning aids, but just be aware that sometimes a video online will show somethings slightly different.
      Past that, it is never too old to get into if you are so inclined (haha I'm always trying to recruit people) . I got back into TKD after 20yrs, when my son went to a club on a recruitment "bring a buddy" night and found he loved it, I lasted about 2 weeks sitting on the sidelines until I couldn't take it, now I'm teaching at my club and my whole family is involved (wife had run the ofc for about 2 years and just started training). If you have a good instructor they can tailor your learning around what you are comfortable doing, some adults students can't spar or perform some movements just because of what life has done to their bodies, a good teacher will work around this and down the road alot of those students find that they surprise themselves with what they can accomplish after awhile. Martial arts really is a great thing for family members to do together, and TKD is one of the more accepting marital arts in the way that some other MA's are too intensive for younger or older students (not to lessen what TKD can do though!) but if not, that's alright as well, just be supportive. At 7 yrs old she has a long way to go both pyhsically and mentally, sometimes that can be a tough road for a young one, and they might want to quit at times. there are very few people that ever regret learning a martial arts, but alot that might regret quiting one. It's not easy all the time, and kids sometimes need the kick in the butt to keep going. Glad to hear that it took about a year to get a yellow belt, sounds like the instructor might not be puhing too fast, some schools will belt fast to keep the kids interest, but when you get a 10yr black belt they don't learn the value of patience and perseverence. Also then they get bored cause they got their black belt too fast then feel there is no where else to go (sory I'm a firm beliver that below 14 or 16 a kid shouldn't have a BB, even though my son's on track to a BB before that age, most kids just aren't ready. )
      • 1
      KSP08 Welcome to the world of TKD!
      • 1
      Andy Hi [238427,Dan Wilkins], welcome to the community :) you have certainly come to the right place to discover new forms and a whole load of other martial arts information.
    • 6 more comments
    • 3
    Training with your kids
    I started Taekwondo at the age of 50. My youngest son started and I was taking him then waiting for him to finish. Finally decided that perhaps I should join in as well. Started with my oldest son so the 3 of us trained and went through the colour belts. Youngest son always in front. When he became a 1st Dan I got him to help us at home with our patterns. Both oldest son and myself were awarded 1st Dan at the week-end. Best decision I ever made was to join in. The training together especially the sparring has been great. Anyone out there just taken their kids to class should seriously think about joining in and training with them.
      • 2
      Ray It's a definite family tradition with my team. All 5 of us train. thankfully my wife and I are coaches at a mma gym so the kids get a wide range of classes.

      Some days we are there 5 or more hours. And the kids love it. Its fun to watch the kids working the heavy bags, weight training, pull ups etc. Just for fun.

      As I look back some of our best family moments were on the mat. How many kids get to kick their parents and get away with it.
      • 0 2 votes
      • Reply
      • 1
      Rachel DS I started training a week after my son. He has since stopped but my daughter started this year before he stopped and we train together. The kids train alongside the adults but have different grading material etc. Sometimes nshe trains or watches at the adult class and she went to camp with me. She watched me do my first panel grading. We encourage each other!
      • 1
      Lisa Phillips I did the exact same thing. My daughter has been taking Gongkwon Yusul lessons for over a year now. About 7 months ago, I decided I was going to join as well mainly as a way to get a good work out, stretch, and meditation. I figured it would be excellent stress relief. Since then, I have nearly caught up to my daughter's belt level. We have some seperate classes due to age, and some together. It has been a great experience for me and has taught her a lot of great qualities like discipline, self-control, respect, and focus that have carried over into our home life. Best decision ever!
    • 8 more comments
    • 3
    Taekwondo Master Leedonghee Poomse Application
    Master Leedonghee is one of my favorite TDK master who mastered the real purpose of taekwondo poomse which is to be used at combat situation and self defense.
      • 2
      Will - Black Belt Wiki I liked how he used chest protectors, helmets, etc. in order to practice stronger strikes & kicks during the self-defense training (versus the usual "pulled" punches when a training partner isn't wearing any protection).

      Although the opening shot of his dobok (gi) looks like it has gone through a zombie apocalypse. :)

      Will
      • 2
      Will - Black Belt Wiki [229865,Jin Choi]

      Sorry for the delay in approving your posts. I am a tad slow at night (USA time). :)

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
      • 1
      Martin Alcala Need to see the second and third strikes from the attacker, because in the street some guys can take your first shot and they keep coming at you. In full contact practice if you train with different people who will challenge your skills and stamina will lead to a better understanding of yourself in your strengths and more importantly what you need to work on, because there is always work if you are true to yourself.
    • 5 more comments
    • 3
    Hello
    I like to say hello and I have been involved with martial arts for over 10 years, tae kwon do and Karate. I was very active in tae kwon do before I injured my right knee torn acl, hopefully I can get back into it, getting my balance and flexibility back.
      • 1
      Colin Grieve I know how you feel. Ruptured my achillies tendon a few years ago when I was just a yellow tag. 7 month off training before I got back. Was very wary of doing any sort of jumping and kicking with that foot for over a year. However got confidence in that foot back and have just recently been awarded my Black Belt.
      • 1
      Andy Hi [201701,john david christopher smith] and welcome to the community :) Sorry to hear about the knee injury but great to hear that you are thinking of getting back on track. You should be fine as long as you take things steady and ease back into training.
      • 1
      Hermit Keep at it man, always good to hear stories from anyone that has been injured, and still keeps their head up and keeps going. Has already or probably will happen to almost everyone in a martial arts at one time or another, and that's the point it's easiest to give up. But the perseverance of getting back into it makes us better all around. I gave up on wrestling years ago in high school due to injury, and while wrestling was never really something I enjoyed that much, using that injury as a reason to quite (and a reason not to get back into something as active for a long time after), wasn't the best way to go out now that I look back on it.
    • 2 more comments
    • 3
    Seeking advice on using a martial arts heavy bag
    Hello to all!

    I've been back into Martial Arts now (Teakwondo) for about five months now after quitting 30 years ago. I'm able to attend two classes a week, and have really seen some strides in getting back into shape as well as getting some technique back (I test for my yellow belt this Friday, currently a white belt/yellow stripe).

    So I'm fortunate enough to have a home gym. I bought an 80 pound Heavy bag and plan to add a work out on the weekend. Basically some weight training for my upper body, stretching (always doing that) and heavy bag work for kicking.

    Any advice? Things to avoid?

    Thanks!

    David
      • 2
      David Ianetta @Will , Thanks Will, that's awesome advice. Several things I hadn't thought of! Oh, and as a follow up, last night I did earn my yellow belt!
      • 2
      Will - Black Belt Wiki Some additional suggestions/thoughts

      1. Make sure a hanging bag is securely fastened to a strong beam or on its own stand. Some strong back kicks might rip it off the ceiling. :)
      2. Consider what you want to wear on your feet. Some heavy bags will rip up bare feet as they are made from tough plastic. You might need to wear martial arts shoes for the rougher plastic heavy bags. Leather bags are easier on bare feet.
      3. What are you placing under the heavy bag? Do you have a martial arts mat? Wooden floor? You should try to simulate the conditions at your Taekwondo school.
      4. Place tape "markers" on the bag for accuracy, esp. for high kicks (i.e. try to hit the tape X with a spinning hook kick).
      5. Start off slow and make sure the technique is correct first. Then speed up the technique and add combinations.
      6. Watch out for spectators. You don't want the swinging bag to knock out the kids. :)

      Will
      • 2
      ChuckD Like the members said above I would work up to hitting the bag full force to make sure your technique is there to avoid injury. In the mean time and I still do this with my wavemaster is I will pick points on it to strike and just work on accuracy and then ramp the power up while trying to maintain accuracy.
    • 14 more comments
    • 3
    Most Popular Taekwondo Video on Youtube
    Here is one of the most popular Taekwondo videos on Youtube (after screening out knockout videos, etc.). It has been seen over 13 million times since it was created in Jan 2013. The video is focused on a Taekwondo instructor dressed up as and acting like Spiderman. This video "theme" might sound corny... but watch his amazing moves and kicks.

    Are you surprised or not surprised that this video is so popular?

    I am going to post a few more "most popular" martial arts videos over the next week in order to give you a sample of what people like to watch. Of course, this will exclude fight and knockout videos as we want to remain family friendly. :)

    Will
    Black Belt Wiki
      • 1
      Andy I would of picked a better superhero than Spider-Man, he's ok but he has trouble getting out of the bath tub and he is terrified of people with rolled up newspapers. :)
      • 1
      John Just like tv ratings - entertainment beats serious shows every day. This guy does instructional videos but none seems anywhere near as popular as him jumping around in a costume.
      • 1
      Andy It's the hand stand style kicks that 'look' like capoeira, I could be wrong though (it happens occasionally lol) I have added a capoeira demonstration video to the community to see what other members think. :)
    • 3 more comments
    • 2
    Eating before class
    What is the best time to eat before to take a class?
      • 3
      Andy Hi [243812,Viktor], it depends on what time the class is! I would say that for evening classes (which tend to be the norm in most cases), 2 hours or so before class is best (giving your body time to digest and metabolise/utilise the fuel and sustain you through practice), personally I tend to eat light prior to practice and then eat (and drink :) well after working up a good appetite!
      • 3
      Kathryn Carson Dates and nuts work well for me. Maybe a chicken sandwich if I'm really hungry. But nothing within an hour of class or testing. Even a salad would turn into a brick in my belly! :-P
      • 2
      Maqsood Mansoor My personal experience is that at least 3 hours before training is better. Less than that you would feel sluggish. But I need some energy and you don't have any choice then choose fruit juice before training (1/2h before) this will give you energy for training
    • 8 more comments
    • 2
    3rd Degree Black Belt form, Master Kwon and Master An
    The past few months we have had two Masters visiting from South Korea. This was a rare treat during my last belt test. Master Hong (my instructor) actually asked, "what poomse do you want to see?" I'm amazed at how in sync these women are without practicing together.
      • 1
      Will - Black Belt Wiki David

      Wow. I think that people practicing together for weeks would have a hard time duplicating their precision. Thanks for sharing.

      Will
      • 1
      PAUL (paldo) REYNOLDS obviously the point here is proper training by different dojos. Well done ! How will effect your personal training is the real question I have for you.
    • 4 more comments
    • 2
    Great Book on Taekwondo
    OK, first let me say that I am not promoting this book for the author! This isn't one of those marketing gimmicks.

    I simply found this book on Amazon and had to share it. This is the first time I read a Martial Arts book that I couldn't put down.

    If anyone wants to get into the practical application of taekwondo principles, a little history of our art thrown in, this book is for you. It is very well written, covers a variety of topics. It is not a how to book on taekwondo, it is more about the tenants, the thoughts behind the art, the culture.

    Very well written, I couldn't put it down.

    That being said, I figure there must be other books out there as good as this one, so I'd love to hear about them. I'm reading this one now for the second time, just slower.

    I put the link in below in case you'd like to check it out.



    https://www.amazon.com/Taekwondo-Ancient-Wisdom-Modern-Warrior/dp/1886969930/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1488478300&sr=1-1&keywords=Taekwondo%3A+Ancient+Wisdom+for+the+Modern+Warrior
      • 2
      Andy [183970,David Ianetta], sounds like a good read, I'll definitely add it to my MA Library! One of the threads I started on day 2 of this community was 'recommended reads' which was designed for us martial artists to share our favourite MA books but unfortunately the thread proved unpopular (though it is still lurking somewhere on the boards :)
      3 of the books I highly recommended (and still do) are 1. Angry White Pyjamas by Robert Twigger
      2. Autumn Lightening by Dave Lowry
      3. Persimmon Wind by Dave Lowry
      All of these are (in my opinion) excellent books that portray the respective authors personal depth and insight into MA training. All three of these books are related to Japanese MA but offer great insight into the martial arts in general (I don't practice TKD but I am already interested in the book you have recommend and will hence forth find and order a copy :) Thank you for the recommendation.
      • 1
      Andy [183970,David Ianetta], finally finished the book! :) I must say it is an excellent read and there are many principles, ideas and teachings that I whole heartedly agree with. My only concern with the book is that it places too much emphasis on old Korean martial arts being responsible for the modern practice of TKD and doesn't fully acknowledge the major influences that Japanese Karate have had on the development of Taekwondo (though it does reference older Japanese martial traditions), overall though I loved it!
      • 1
      David Ianetta I was able to find ""The Making of a Martial Artist" by Sang Kyu Shim in paper back, I'm reading it for the second time, it is an amazing book.
    • 13 more comments
    • 2
    New member
    Hi Everyone

    I am really happy to join this group and get to know you all.
    • 2
    Gratitude
    Thank you to the responses to the thread on training at home. It's important personally to remain a martial artist throughout life and the replies helped! any further advice definitely welcomed. Kamsahamnida!
      • 1
      Will - Black Belt Wiki You are quite welcome. Remember if you have any more questions, please feel free to post them here on the community.

      For anyone who wants to add their thoughts to Jonie's original question, here is the link - http://community.blackbeltwiki.com/post/5867661/training-alone

      Will
    • 2
    Video of a Taekwondo "Grandma"
    Speaking of Taekwondo & Kyokushin grandmas, you might like to watch this self-defense video.

    For commentary on a real Taekwondo grandma, please visit this post - http://community.blackbeltwiki.com/post/5848252/taekwondo-grandma

    Will
    Black Belt Wiki
      • 2
      Andy That's some 'little red riding hood' crap right there! "Why grandma, what big arms, fists and feet you have!" :)
      • 1
      Ray Lol.

      This made me think of my freind who is therapist for disabled indaviduals. He has been looking for as much info on cane fighting as possible. He uses it for therapy and to increase confidence. Plus the American disability act allows you to carry your walking stick/ weapon everywhere. No questions asked.
      • 1
      Christopher Adamchek Wow...
    • 3 more comments
    • 2
    TKDD(Taekwondo Defense)
    World Taekwondo Defense Federation
    They focus on self defense using taekwondo forms and by combining other martial arts to be used at real life situation.
      • 2
      PAUL (paldo) REYNOLDS Very good video of self-defence techniques @ Jin Choi. I hope others will see the difference in regular karate with the additional self-defence techniques. This is a good demonstration of how it should be with realism. Notice the good instruction in the role plalying (slow to know the techniques and faster to perfect the techniques. I realize not all schools emphasize self-defense, but thats why I persolally call it incomplete if they don't have any self-defense techniques as a black belt, however, I do respect those who dawn the black belt.
      • 0 2 votes
      • Reply
      • 1
      Christopher Adamchek Good adaptive TKD
      • 1
      Martin Alcala Very good techniques, but need to see how the instructor can work with full contact and the fighting is not pre planned. The test of your abilities is under pressure and how you react to being hit from all angles. Your offensive and defensive movements determined the out come of your workout plus do you have a good chin.
    • 6 more comments




Become a wiki community member if you want to receive our weekly newsletter with all of our recent top-rated posts!


All rights reserved.
Legal Disclaimer