Women

    • 5
    Where are all the karate women?
    I would like to connect with other women in MA. I train in traditional Japanese / Okinawan karate and am very often the only XX in class. I would like to connect with other like minded women who think it isn't crazy to train in MA.
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      Carman Cole I believe as a woman the key to getting us in karate is our families. Finding ways to connect with our children and spend time with them. Showing our family how to be loyal, patient, and respect esp.with my two boys, is so important. Families that practice together stay together. 😄
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      (deleted) p.s. personally, I would love to see more woman participate in karate and martial arts regardless of the distinctions I mention - the more folks the merrier I say.
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      Dr. Elizabeth Mattke Howdy! I'm kinda new here...kinda not, but I'm a martial arts woman whom will be testing next week for my orange belt in Okinawan Kempo Karate looking forward to it. I have my 1stances degree black belt in Krav Maga. Blessings.
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    Karate women need to come back here and post there ideas
    Hope to here from you
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      Kathryn Carson I've been out of pocket for three weeks now (radiation treatment will do that--I'm officially working on my black-belt-in-kicking-cancer's-butt). Hopefully I'll get a bit more active (both on the page and in the dojang) in the coming weeks. :-)
      • 1
      S.P. sorry the Wiki system is more confusing to me than learning a new kata. I cannot figure how to reply to what someone may've commented on the rare post I sent... Anyway, how can we vote when every female is a champ IMHO.
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      Rachel DS About 6 hours.....we left the car home. :)
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    Large rise in martial arts training for Indian women
    Given the rise in assaults against women in India, many Indian women are going to self-defense classes and joining martial arts schools. Indian state governments are even adding self-defense classes to the regular educational curriculum.

    For more on this topic, you might like to read this International Business Times article - http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/how-indias-women-are-using-martial-arts-fight-back-against-sexual-violence-1541199

    However, the article states "Critics have pointed out that without better intervention at the source of the problem, however, rates of sexual violence will continue to rise in India. Without improved police action and ensuring the legal system benefits victims, assault rates will rise whether or not women learn to free themselves from an attacker's grip or disable a perpetrator with a strategic kick".

    Also remember to visit the wiki page on women's self-defense if you need any ideas for training and/or subjects for class instruction - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/women-self-defense
      • 2
      Ben I approve of people getting martial arts training, but wish it was not for people to need to defend themselves. Besides, unless steps are taken to address that segments of the population feel they can assault women, it's only placing an onus on women.
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      Randy Wheeler Superamazingbadgerman I agree we should all know how to defend ourselves and take control of a situation, but the sad part of this now a day you can be charged for defending yourself or others!

      A few years back a guy went to attach my son so I shoved him out of the way before he could strike. This guy in turn called the cops and pressed charged (criminal charges) for assault. When the cops arrested us I told them the story and they said we should have called them and did nothing.

      This is our justice system now. Have you ever heard the saying, the law protects the criminal? Well this is a perfect example.

      So therefore by what the cops told me we have no right to protect ourselves and should not intervene and call them and they will handle it.
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      Superamazingbadgerman In America, we have the right to bear arms.

      We also have the RESPONSIBILITY TO TRAIN!!!!!!

      It's a shame not everyone gets training (or even sees the importance in it).

      People who say, "just call the police" (or something like that) are either in denial, or don't have a sense of just how long they take and just how fast things happen. You CAN call the cops (and probably should), but YOU'RE the first (and probably last) responder to YOUR situation.

      YOU NEED TO BE ABLE TO RESPOND TO IT!!!!!

      This means IT'S YOUR RESPONSIBILITY to be prepared and YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO TRAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      I don't know how good their government program is, but anything that makes it easier to carry out the RESPONSIBILITY TO TRAIN!!!!!!!!!!!! sounds good to me!
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    • 3
    Hit me with your best shot.
    https://sagiashidachi.wordpress.com/2015/10/24/hitting-on-girls-respect-me-but-dont-treat-me-differently/

    Invited to post the odd link to my blog with element of controversy.....this may count.
      • 2
      Will - Black Belt Wiki [172080,Rachel DS]

      I think there are a number of reasons why some men treat women differently than other men while sparring & training.

      1. Many men are raised not to hit women (i.e. their sisters) so it is semi-instinctual to hold back.
      2. Some martial arts women want everything at full power in order to test themselves. Others do not. This confuses things and many men hit softer until they know what each female student wants.

      Will
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      Christopher Adamchek i agree with you

      but to play a slight devils advocate i have a few points
      - The chest / core are huge targets on the human body but when training with a woman if you hit them hard in the breast it can have damaging effects, the female reproductive organs are internal so if a woman gets hit in the stomach it can cause more damage than it could a man, also women are physically sexually dimorphic in having a slightly smaller frame
      - So men holding back in the dojo might not be sexism and just respect to injuring their partner
      - So you either need to be hardcore woman to be ready to really fight with men or wear protection so that he doesnt have to worry about hurting you
      - Every kick you through in sparing with a man isnt to the groin because usually you respect that target or he will wear a cup , so its a similar reversed issue

      all "you's" are of hypothetical lol =)
      • 1
      Joe Bramblett Women tend to have prettier faces, and be about half my size in general. If I hit my usual training partner in the face full force, first, it's likely to do a lot less damage to him than it would any of the women in the dojo, and second, even if I break his jaw, he's still just going to look like a big hairy dude with a broken jaw, not a woman who was pretty until I screwed that up. There aren't any ugly women in the dojo, (especially not the ones who can tie me in knots) so it's not like there are any that could benefit from some reshaping, and honestly I'd be hard pressed to go full bore against a guy the size of the average woman unless and until he proved to me personally that he could either block or soak up everything I can throw at him.
      Now, let me put on some 28oz gloves, and I'll let you take your chances against full force, full speed punches. I do agree that you can't really be sure a technique will work until you've used it against a serious attack, but at the same time, the danger can be mitigated with proper gear.
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    Female Stereotypes in Martial Arts
    Are there any female stereotypes associated with your particular MA?

    For example in BJJ, some believe that women are only there to find men, or that they don't take it as seriously. Also you see a lot of female martial artists being sexualized by the media or in order to sell equipment like a gi.
      • 3
      Alex So some of these are more micro aggressions or the like. They probably didn't even realize they were being sexist or disrespectful. I had one guy flat out tell me no because he doesn't wrestle with girls. It made me a little angry but he was from another country so culturally it could be a huge problem for him.
      I've had guys go super light, like barely even touching me. After a roll where I've just slaughtered them they will usually say: "Wow! you're really good!" and maybe just reading that it sounds like a compliment but it's not. They are saying that because they thought they could either beat me or at least handle me. They are surprised that for my size I was able to submit them. I've never heard a white belt say that to my fiancé or any of the other upper belt males. It's also incredibly hard to get white belts to spar with me. I asked a group of about 5 men if any of them wanted to spar and they said no. I had one guy say he was just watching, then not 30 seconds after I walked a way a dude walked in and the guy that said no was more than happy to get up and roll with them. -.-

      I've heard people say things like "BJJ helps you grow balls" or there was a purple belt in another school that was talking about hipsters taking over other "manly" things and (please pardon my language, I would never use this word but he did so...) "cuntifying" it. As if that in some way made it less of what it was. Someone asked him to clarify what he meant by using that word, he said he didn't mean it as a female body part but as someone who is conniving, backhanded and manipulative. This was an upper belt, which made it all the worse. I've had teammates who have been sexually harassed, luckily I train with mostly great people and they would never treat me like that or tolerate anyone who did.

      I am definitely not seen as dedicated as my fiancé is even though we both train the same amount and I spar just as much as he does. I was talking to a friend about being frustrated with being overlooked during promotions, that it seems so easy for my fiancé, he gets noticed so much, and in the time I have gotten 2 promotions he has gotten 5. My friend looked at me and said: "Well, yeah he's a beast", as if I am in someway less of a beast. I'm on the mats just as much as he is, and honestly I probably have to work harder than he does because I'm so small and because I have a lot going against me, being small and being a female and being physically weaker than most people in the gym.
      • 3
      Rachel DS I was at a rules seminar before our tournament (mostly for Sensei / dojo heads to learn judging and rules but also for participants to learn rules and etiquette which is why I went) and I was the only female student there, the others (both Senpai actually) were black and brown belt. They were doing fake events so we could practice walking on / off and bowing etc and so the judges could learn how to score events. They announced Mens advanced team Kata (and someone called out that I had got a promotion - to being a man....as opposed to being Shodan or advanced brown even).....there was one other female in the room (a shihan) who was also fuming......but actually I thought it wasn't only sexist and ignorant but disrespectful.
      • 3
      Alex I always wear a rashguard under mine to try to keep from showing too much of my tummy (i'm self-conscious)-but I do know some women who look good in gis. I don't. I always look frumpy and about 50 lbs heavier. haha. I went to a seminar yesterday and picked out the gi that I look the best in. I get there, change and am tying my belt when I realize I grabbed my 220 lbs 6'5'' fiance's gi top instead of mine. I guess that's what I get for buying the same exact gi as him, just in my size. *sigh*
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    • 3
    Girl Power - Muay Thai Style
    Here is one of the most popular Muay Thai videos on Youtube. It was published this year and already has over 14 million views.

    It shows a professional female Muay Thai fighter acting as a new student at a Muay Thai school. At first, she is semi-abused by the instructors due to her apparent "inexperience". However later, she shows them who is the boss!

    Will
    Black Belt Wiki
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      Andy [171668,Black Belt Wiki], that's even better lol, she's a very capable lady, bet her husband does his fair share of the washing up! :)
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      Will - Black Belt Wiki [171807,Andy]

      This is sort of like the TV show in the US called "Bully Beat Down" (where someone who has been bullied gets a professional fighter to take on the bully in the ring).
      • 1
      Andy Now that's a prank! Get a professional Muay Thai fighter to come and knock the snot out of your fighters! :)
    • 3
    Does a blackbelt karate female need to be any less or more concerned about her s...
    I've always been super safety conscious but as I've gone up in kyu levels I've probably gotten worse.

    It's probably due to the fact in nearly every self defense class you are told how to prevent or get out of some new attack.

    I feel slightly more confident I could escape most attackers but I'm surprised that with all my training I
    am still so nervous about my safety.
      • 4
      Tim Waeyaert I come from an Aikido background, so to me the best fight is the one that is never fought.

      Practice the most basic idea be aware of your surroundings, If something looks dicey exit. If you can not exit, avoid, if you can not avoid then redirect, if you can not redirect then confront (verbally). If confront fails hope your training is better than theirs.

      Sometimes problems can not be avoided, when presented no other options employ your training to its fullest extent and do not hold back anything. This scenario is not the dojo where the goal is both people go home safely.
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      Andrea Harkins "The Martial Arts Woman" I always say, you cannot train for every possible defense. There are so many scenarios that could occur. I encourage women to focus on big concepts first like awareness. Then learn a few techniques for different holds. Many times, you can modify very basic techniques for a variety of situations. Concerned about safety in your class? No, hopefully not. Concerned in real life? We should all be. That is preparation in itself. In any real situation you will be nervous. So, use that to your advantage knowing if you really get attacked, you can make that nervous adrenaline work in your favor.
      • 2
      Mea Lane As an older woman, I too am concerned about safety. Although I have been training for 10 years, I am not convinced I could protect myself in a dire situation. We train both self defense and traditional martial arts equally in my discipline. The important thing is to train regularly to ingrain muscle memory. If your response is automatic, you move quicker. The best option is to avoid the danger and go home safely.
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    • 3
    Women & Self-Defense
    Since we have a good conversation going on about "Where are all the karate women?", I thought that I would ask about women's self-defense.

    We have a wiki section focused on women's self-defense - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/women-self-defense

    However, it was designed by a man (yours truly :) so I would like to get some input from the women in the community on how to improve it, things to add or delete from this section, items that need changing, etc.

    Also are there other things that should be added to the main wiki in order to help female martial artists?

    Thanks!

    Will
    Black Belt Wiki
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      Will - Black Belt Wiki Interesting study just released on the effectiveness of college rape prevention programs.

      NY Times article - http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/12/health/college-rape-prevention-program-proves-a-rare-success.html?_r=0
      New England Journal of Medicine - http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMsa1411131

      According to the NY Times, "In a randomized trial, published in The New England Journal of Medicine, first-year students at three Canadian campuses attended sessions on assessing risk, learning self-defense and defining personal sexual boundaries. The students were surveyed a year after they completed the intervention.The risk of rape for 451 women randomly assigned to the program was about 5 percent, compared with nearly 10 percent among 442 women in a control group who were given brochures and a brief information session."

      Read these articles because they review things such as "strategies to protect themselves at social gatherings, such as buddy systems", role playing, self-defense techniques, etc.

      I will add these articles as references on the women's self-defense section.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
      • 2
      Fran For me the most important thing is to keep it simple, as Rachel said, one or two techniques that can be adapted but ones you are comfortable with. Practice! Scream 'FIRE' instead of help or rape, may have better chance of getting Help. Always be mindful of your safety and if the worst happens don't be afraid to get really 'impolite' and downright dirty. Every area is a target and hands, nails, feet, elbows, knees, teeth, voice are all weapons...
      • 2
      Rachel DS Excellent timing since I just went to a self defense seminar at one of my clubs last night. That was the third I have been to there. I started a blog entry about it and should finish over the weekend so I will link it in when finished. We covered one basic drill which should pretty much cover most scenarios but then discussed a couple of other situations. We also did aground escape class last year and will have another. Most important thing is kiss principles I think and my sensei did a great job.
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    Is Women's Self Defense Necessary?
    I have conducted these types of classes, and see other schools promote these courses all the time. The question seems to be “Is Women’s Self-Defense Necessary” or is it a gimmick? The simple answer is that it can be either. It is not a cure all and is NOT a class to guarantee success in defending oneself. If it is promoted as such, then you should be wary of participating in it. It is known by my students, and will be made known to any future students, be it in my Women’s Self Defense Class or in regular Karate Classes, that Martial Arts takes a LONG time to become proficient in. And, all because one knows Martial Arts, that does not mean that they can effectively defend themselves or win in a hand to hand combat situation. Martial Arts training provides the person defending themselves with training, and thus a distinct advantage against the person being the aggressor. These things are apparent to myself and my students.

    Is Women’s Self Defense even necessary, relevant, or worth-while?

    The question remains, however; is Women’s Self Defense even necessary, relevant, or worth-while? The short answer is – yes. Women’s Self Defense is important, relevant, and effective for the target audience- women. Women and men, for the most part, differ in strength and physical ability. Women’s Self Defense Classes should, first and foremost, identify that, and work with the perceived “disability” of the female in a physical confrontation with a male, or even a larger female.

    Be cautious of some instructors

    Examples of non-effective, gimmick classes would be the price, for one. Exorbitant prices for a class, with flashy Instructors relying on flashy demonstrations should be a key indicator that the Instructors are there to show off THEIR skills, and collect YOUR money, and NOT to give you the skill-set to practice. If the Instructor does not want to get to know you, and identify what potentially makes you a target, it is likely that they care less about your ability to defend yourself, and more about getting you to sign up with their school.

    Be sure to understand what you are getting into. Make sure that there is actual instruction taking place, for example, the Instructor will be taking you through how to punch and kick and what areas of your attacker that you will be targeting. Ensure that there will be a block of instruction on improvised weapons and non-lethal weapons (pepper spray, etc.). It should also be emphasized that one or two class sessions is not the solution to your safety. These Classes should be designed to make you aware to potential problem areas in your life and give you the tools which you will need to continually work on to better be able to defend yourself. It takes time.

    Still, some people are of the opinion that providing training specifically geared for women is useless, even dangerous. I completely disagree. Providing a Self Defense Class especially for women is important because there is a special need, and abilities which women have that men do not, and these abilities need to be capitalized upon!

    I think that providing Women’s Self Defense Courses to first help specifically women become aware and more able to defend themselves and also generalized Martial Arts Instruction to a mixed Student Body to help all people become better individuals is absolutely necessary. I think that neglecting either of these aspects of Martial Training is dangerous and even irresponsible.

    The point of Martial Arts is to live better through Martial Arts. Not having to ever defend oneself, but having enjoyed the healthy benefits of Martial Arts is my goal as a Kenpo Karate Instructor. I never want to hear of, or see a fellow person being hurt in an assault. But if a person is assaulted unjustly, I simply LOVE to hear that they successfully defended themselves using Martial Arts.
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      Richie My work is building a gym on campus. I plan on doing a free self-defense class whenever I have the time. I will start all my classes with "I am teaching you the icing on the cake without the cake." I hope that will help them realize they can't go be Batgirl after one class.
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      Alex I don't like women's only self-defense. I think that women learning self-defense is super important but women's self defense classes in my opinion are useless, at least the ways I've seen them taught. What I like is seminars that teach concepts instead of moves, so they discuss the "before" of a self-defense situation so that hopefully no woman in that room finds themselves in a situation where they have to defend themselves.

      As you stated the only way to truly learn how to defend yourself is to find a martial art and dedicate yourself to it, and even then it may not help. I train BJJ and I believe that if I had all my mental faculties that I would be able to defend myself if I had to, but if I were in a situation where I was drugged then no amount of martial arts are going to keep me safe, what will keep me safe though is knowing never to accept a drink from someone if I didn't see it made right in front of me, or drinking from a cup that I sat down and looked away from etc. These are the things I like to learn in a self-defense seminar because no amount of training is going to help me if I drank from a tainted drink.

      For what it's worth I also don't care much for women's only classes in general. I understand it as a tool to introduce the art to women who are uncomfortable training with men at first but if we want them to learn to defend themselves they need to learn how to do the moves on men, especially larger men. This of course does not include women who have dealt with violence at the hands of a man, I understand why they would stick strictly to a women's only class rather than moving to the co-ed class.
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      Will - Black Belt Wiki Other than saying that I believe that self-defense training is useful for everyone, perhaps some of our female members would like to respond to this post such as [172080,Rachel DS] , [176815,Alex] , [217372,KSP08] , [220307,Beth Loomer] , etc.

      Will
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    Kung Fu Nuns from Nepal
    Speaking of Nunjas... here are some real life nuns from Nepal who are focusing on Kung Fu as part of their monastic life.

    Will
    Black Belt Wiki
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      Andy Here's how 'real' hardcore nuns roll! :)
      https://youtu.be/8wsSacnyP6I
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      James Awesome. I want to see the Nunjas take on the Nepalese nuns in a gruesome fight to the death.
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    Happy Mother's Day
    Happy mother's day to all of the martial arts moms of the world. I hope you are doing something special with your family today.

    Will
    Black Belt Wiki
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      Al W My mum wasn't very pleased with what I bought her for Mother's Day in March, especially seeing as I paid for it to be shipped from where I live to her home in Scotland.

      How was I supposed to know she didn't want a new broomstick
      • 1
      PAUL (paldo) REYNOLDS @ Andy / @Will-Wiki: Giri is honored ! Honored mamasan at her grave with family followed by a family dinner at a nearby restaurant...now need more "yen' !
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      Andy [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki], Mother's Day in the UK was March 26th! I have no idea why it is a different date country wide but I assure you I looked after my mum and treat her to various presents :) I personally hold with the Japanese principle of Giri and as such look after my parents on a daily basis as they looked after me in my younger years .
    • 2
    The end of Rhonda Rousey? Or will she rebound?
    Rhonda Rousey finally loses. This was not an epic Ali versus Frazer type battle. It was Rousey being completely dominated by Holly Holm. Given Rousey's past dominance have MMA fighters figured her out?

    In the past, Rousey beat her foes primarily with her grappling skills. However, in this fight, she was beaten by superior boxing skills and her inability to get her opponent on the ground.

    Can Rousey come back from this lopsided loss? Also what happens to her giant marketing & endorsement machine?

    In case you are interested, here is the martial arts background of Holly Holm - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holly_Holm

    Will
    Black Belt Wiki
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      Will - Black Belt Wiki It will be interesting to see if Rhonda Rousey's "attitude" towards her competitors will change after this loss.

      Here is a quote from one of her competitors - "“I don’t feel sorry for her – I think she kind of got what was coming to her,” Tate said. “This was something that was long overdue. I feel like maybe now she’s going to be more humble in her approach. I would respect her even more as an athlete and as a competitor. I would respect her more if she was a little bit more humble in her approach to all of this."

      Source - http://mmajunkie.com/2015/11/miesha-tate-maybe-now-ronda-rousey-will-be-more-humble-in-her-approach

      Will
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      Andrea Harkins "The Martial Arts Woman" Anyone can fight their way back. And I think she will remain a dominant force in the media simply because she is a fighter. She has already made a name for herself...and I'm sure she'll stage a comeback event. We'll see.
      • 1
      Nathifa - Martial Arts Mom (MAM) I've been extremely overwhelmed schedule wise (hence my absence here as well), so I honestly haven't seen the full fight up to now and like to refrain from commenting blindly. I theoretically agree with some of the previous comments though that perhaps her previous "lack of defeat" in MMA worked against her. I think you learn the most about yourself when you evaluate what you did wrong, rather than only what you did right that worked. Her short matches spoke to her strengths but not her endurance.

      Holly seems to have the experience of both wins and losses and the skills and techniques from her boxing background. As a professional boxer she would have definitely gained a lot of experience not just physically fighting but mentally staying on top --she defended her title 18 times!

      i think whatever Ronda does next will make or break her career. Winning is great, but how you lose and learn from loss can be greater.
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    "'Suffrajitsu': How the Suffragettes Fought Back Using Martial Ar...
    I thought this was really interesting and thought you guys might as well. :)

    http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-34425615
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      Alex Awesome! thank you! I will have to see if I can't dig up any more information.
      • 1
      Will - Black Belt Wiki [176815,Alex]

      I threw together a quick wiki page on Suffrajitsu - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/suffrajitsu

      Feel free to add more information to this page.

      Will
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      Will - Black Belt Wiki Fascinating article about how "suffrajitsu" came into being and how Jujitsu was used by women in order to protect themselves while protesting for the right to vote.

      Will
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    52 to 57
    I am 57 and currently 2 nd degree black belt in TKD. I too have the same worries about not wanting to acquire any great injuries. Class sparring is not a problem but tournaments are becoming more of a trial as there are fewer and fewer women in my age group. Sometimes none so then I am put with the 18 to 32 years age group and you can see it on their faces let the fun begin.
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      Ced Greetings Amy, I just wanted to add to those who would encourage you to hang in there. Although I am no longer a karate practitioner since the early 70's having switched to aikijujutsu. Just for the record I am turning 65 this month and am at a point in my recovery from shoulder surgery last October where I can't wait to get back on the tatami. Additionally, having retired from the work force and moved to another state (over a 1000 miles away) from where my last school was I am in the process of opening a new aikijujutsu dojo here. As a Japanese stylist of a koryu art I believe like the bushi warriors, that it was honorably to die in battle, so keep up the fight and hang in there because it's not about the enemy it's about you and how well you engage. Be well.
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      (deleted) Change the perspective, as an older person you need to get sneaky, sneaky takes the smile of the 18 to 32's faces hehehehehehe
      • 1
      Mea Lane I do not know if TSD has many tournaments, but our school does not participate in them. Our alliance has had a couple of tournaments that all of our local schools participated in, but I chose to be a spectator. Our alliance considers ATSD a traditional Martial Art and self defense system, not a sport. One of our Masters explains it as the violent application of physics.
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    Do smaller or bigger women gravitate to martial arts?
    I know in every school, every city, every country things can differ, but do you find a certain profile of women actually start and maintain martial arts? I already mentioned that I am older and bigger than most of the women in my school, and I am only in my mid thirties. Then even when I went to tournament with the other schools, I found the many of the women were either smaller and younger or older and very fit. I can stand to lose a few pounds I know, but do you think larger women are intimidated by the thought of going through the rank system?
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      Will - Black Belt Wiki FYI - Speaking of correcting errors (i.e. leaving out a person from a message... cough, cough like I just did :), our software guys are working on a system where everyone can edit their comments but it won't be ready for a couple of months.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
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      Rachel DS I am about average - in shape yes and even moreso since doing karate (so the physical aspects were never overly taxing....and I still find I recover quicker than most people do in class), but probably it was more the 6 yo starting that started me off. My "gravitation" and determination was less to do with the physical and more to do with the mental and confidence side of things / knowing how to handle myself (in a violent situation or just a difficult life situation).
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      Alex At the schools I train at they go relatively slow for the new folks. They are expected to do the warmups-but if they have to stop no one says anything to them. They aren't expected to roll until they get comfortable. At other schools it might be different but I've only trained at one school where you would get called out for not rolling but usually it was because if you were sitting out it meant that someone else was being forced to sit out. You also couldn't come to the advanced class thus not get to spar, until you had trained for so long.
      At MMA you are expected to work the whole time and you will get called out for slowing down if we are doing cardio stuff at the end, but it's for their benefit. It's never done in a mean way it's more like "I know you can do it" "I know you are stronger than this" etc. It's motivational stuff but the coach doesn't let you quit just because you are tired.
    • 9 more comments




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