Strength, Conditioning, etc.

    • 4
    Non-traditional martial arts strength training
    Jesse Encamp posted the below video for a strength training program he has which is designed around Karate.

    https://youtu.be/fO0XIENrCfs

    Not trying to undercut his product, do you have any non-traditional exercises/workouts designed with your MA in mind?
      • 2
      Richie Make a slosh bar. I used the black pipe because it is thicker and the glue is cheaper. You can also get the screw on caps to remove or add water or other things. I put rocks in mine sometimes.

      Great for balance work, forearms, and sticky hands training (moving with the water)

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bA8ATctYX90
      • 2
      Ray When I was in the military we would pull duses around a field, one time we moved several thousand sand bags for p.t. I imagine Imy self doing something similar in the near future.
      • 0 2 votes
      • Reply
      • 2
      James I tend to go through phases of doing "odd stuff" (description courtesy of my wife). At the moment i'm doing a lot of "odd stuff" to strengthen the core like abdominal planks with 110 - 130lb of weight on my back held for 3 reps of between 1 min - 1 min 30 The reason for the weight differences is mainly which one of my son or daughter to sit on my back :) I spend a fair bit of time in head stand doing upside down splits and leg raises and for cardio i'm doing 100 full burpees within a five minute time frame every couple of days. I also do lots of press up variations, elevated, vertical, weighted ( again courtesy of the kids!), one armed, diamond, etc, etc.
    • 13 more comments
    • 3
    Balancing martial arts training and weight training
    For give my ignorance but how do some of you guys schedule your MA and weight training so that you get the most out of both? Also I have a physical labor job.
      • 1
      Dave Magliano Hi Seth. Resistance training and rest periods all come down to the load you are placing on muscle tissue. The higher the load, the more tearing you get. Muscle tearing creates inflammation (bleeding), which causes scarring. As you repeat this process, you must use heavier loads because the body adapts to whatever stress is placed upon it.

      The real question is, why are you weight training? Strength? Mass? Power? Most people train with weights for aesthetics rather than function. So if you're training for function, what is your objective?

      After training with weights for over 20 years, hitting the gym three days a week, I finally realized I could be spending that time perfecting my technique. The best way to do that is body weight training because it spreads out the load instead of placing it all on one muscle group like weight training does. You are forcing muscle groups to work together without over-stressing your tissue and joints. So you can train every day without worrying about over doing it.

      Now of course, this depends on your joints. There are some things I can't do because of shoulder instability, e.g. dips. And if one of your objectives is to build mass, well then you'll have to lift weights but you undoubtedly sacrifice joint motion in most cases which is not good for any martial arts. My two cents.
      • 1
      Alex Alexandrov Do bodyweight exercises instead of weight exercises. It can help you if you find it too complicated doing weight training and martial arts training together.
      • 1
      Will - Black Belt Wiki Hi Seth

      I try to alternate days. For example, martial arts training might be on Mon, Wed, Fri & Sunday. And my strength & conditioning days are on Tues, Thurs & Sat. Of course, life usually interferes with that schedule. :)

      Nevertheless, I try to space things out in order to let my body recover from my training. As a 50 something, I need the recovery time! Many fitness & health sites also recommend alternating days for upper body and lower body strength training.

      According to WebMD, "While that tearing process is vital for the muscle building activity to begin, it's really the respite in the next 48 to 72 hours that leads to muscle strength...one of the key reasons some people don’t see results after 8 to 10 weeks of weight training is because they are simply not giving their bodies adequate time to recover" - http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/features/6-tips-for-successful-weight-lifting-workouts

      Will
    • 3
    Foods for flexibility?
    I'm not a big football fan, but I did read an article about Tom Brady talking about how he eats for his muscle health. He mentioned flexiiblity and longevity and that caught my attention.

    I know we can eat protein for growth, but what about flexibility? Like foods that keep us hydrated, etc? Does anyone have any ideas?
      • 2
      Andy [183970,David Ianetta], all joking aside, I tend to stick to a high protein diet (though admittedly this is because I love meat and seafood :), I also always add carbs (usually rice, noodles or potatoes) and fresh veg (lots of Chilli and garlic both of which are natural antibiotics and generally just good for the blood). Where is [172080,Rachel DS]??? I am sure she would have some good information on nutrition.
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      Will - Black Belt Wiki Never heard of food for flexibility, However, adequate water intake is often seen as necessary for maintaining flexibility - http://www.mensfitness.com/training/pro-tips/7-ways-improve-flexibility

      Will
      • 1
      David Ianetta As a follow up to the question i originally posted. I made one change in my diet. Everyday for lunch I eat a salad consisting of things like red cabbage, avocados, spinach, radishes, red onion, and cucumbers, etc. I have seen a marked improvement in my flexibility. This past week I was able to grab the ball of my foot (from a sitting position) and lock my leg out. While doing a butterfly stretch my head touched my toes.Thanks to all of you who shared your info!
    • 29 more comments
    • 3
    Functional Exercise Drills - Kettlebell, Medicine Ball, Reaction Ball, etc.
    Following up on [209161,Vik Khanna] 's thoughtful post about functional exercises, I am continuing to build out the wiki's fitness sections on "functional" exercises that simultaneously build strength & coordination for a wide range of muscles... and better simulate actual martial arts movements (versus lifting a weight and focusing on a single muscle).

    Just added reaction ball drills today - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/reaction-ball

    Other "functional" sections:
    http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/martial-arts-physical-fitness
    http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/martial-arts-reaction-speed-drills
    http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/medicine-ball-workouts
    http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/kettlebell-workouts
    http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/martial-arts-agility
    and many others.

    I will try to build these out further as some need more drills, etc.

    Will
    Black Belt Wiki
    • 3
    Flexibility in martial arts
    Hi!!

    How important would you rate being flexible in martial arts? and how flexible?

    As a former gymnastics practicioner I miss this a little, though there is acrobacy involved in a martial art I do. However, not comparable to gymnastics.
    I also heard from my karate instructor that too much flexibility causes loss of stability and vice versa. What are your thoughts about that?

    timothy
      • 1
      Vik Khanna I think flexibility is a somewhat outmoded concept. It conjures visions of people (like gymnasts) doing splits and other shudder-inducing moves. Flexibility is defined as the range of motion of a joint. The overwhelming majority of people have a normal range of motion of their joints. But, that doesn't mean they can do a whole lot with that range.

      I like more the notion of mobility, which, simply stated, is the usefulness of that range of motion. If you have a full ROM, but can exert force only through the middle of the range (when the muscle is in the strongest phase of contraction), then you will be limited in your mobility in highly technical movement pursuits like martial arts which often call upon practitioners to be forceful in unconventional postures and at unusual body angles.

      Strength coach Dan John says it best when he notes, "you only need to be as flexible as you need to be." Working on strengthening muscles and connective tissues throughout the ROM continuum, along with dynamic flexibility moves (long-hold static stretching is also quite out moded), is more likely to produce sustainable improved mobility than most other strategies.
      • 1
      Andy As for being 'too' flexible, never agree to pay for the meal after the 3rd date! :)
      • 1
      Andy Thanks [176815,Alex] that sounds very sensible :) One of the reasons I have been out of action for a while has been a bad knee sprain which has taken me a couple of months to recover from (though this was a work not MA related injury) I am SO glad to see the back of that compression strap! :)
    • 9 more comments
    • 3
    How important is physical fitness to a martial art?
    I've trained with all sorts of body types, from big to small and everything in between. I train BJJ, and though it is a very physically demanding MA, it doesn't seem like you have to be that physically fit to do it. I'm skinny but I definitely do not have an athlete's physique. I can understand how being more in shape would be conducive to being able to train more often, for example: I can spar for 3 hours, only requiring breaks to get water, and be fine. Is this because I'm fit or because my body is conditioned to sparring for long periods of time every week? Thoughts?
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      Andrea Harkins "The Martial Arts Woman" I weight train 2-3 times a week and take aerobic classes, too. I've always been attracted to working out diligently and have always had a variety of fitness activities in my life to keep me challenged, along with my martial art and it does help me in my martial art, as well. Strength, flexibility, and endurance from these other work-outs translate directly into my karate and my teaching.
      • 2
      Alex [171786,Christopher Adamchek] unfortunately no, he doc basically forbade him from doing any more martial arts, so now he does cycling. When he does something he goes all in so he has a super fancy bike and all the bike outfit things.
      • 2
      Rachel DS I was pretty fit when I started MA (karate) but I would have to say that the sort of fitness I had was different to what I now have after training for 16 months. I would say that it was helpful to have cardiovascular fitness (which I still have) and a good core (probably even better now) and good flexibility / balance (as I do yoga too) but karate requires a lot more anaerobic activity than I was used to and it took me a while to train my anaerobic fitness. Also the level of / type of muscle strength is different. I have found I have completely changed shape over the last 12 months. I have actually gained weight (through muscle) and my legs and arms are way bigger and more defined than when I was just doing cardio / weights training - I feel stronger too. My plyometrics and hence fast twitch fibres are way better and my reflexes / reaction time feels quicker. The good thing I find about having / keeping my cardio fitness is that when I spar against people who are not so fit in that regard (which is quite a few) they tire a lot quicker and recover a lot slower than me and I can use that to my advantage if I play the right game with them. [176815,Alex] We don't do a lot of rolling but on the few occasions that we have I have found it quite taxing (kind of distracted from it at the time and only really noticed the heavy breathing when I stopped) but I can see that being physically fit from a cardio perspective there would be a distinct advantage provided you also have some tactics (which I don't really - something I would like to try more of in future....one of my Sensei also trains BJJ and one of the other guys does some Judo so perhaps we may do some in class again one day).
    • 9 more comments
    • 3
    Bruce Lee & Martial Arts Injuries
    Given our discussion about how people can be forced to temporarily halt martial arts training due to injuries, I just wanted to say even martial arts legends have suffered this fate.

    Here is a passage from Bruce Lee's biography - "It was actually his zealousness that led to an injury that was to become a chronic source of pain for the rest of his life. On a day in 1970, without warming up, something he always did, Bruce picked up a 125-pound barbell and did a “good morning” exercise. That consists of resting the barbell on one’s shoulders and bending straight over at the waist. After much pain and many tests, it was determined that he had sustained an injury to the fourth sacral nerve. He was ordered to complete bed rest and told that undoubtedly he would never do gung fu again. For the next six months, Bruce stayed in bed. It was an extremely frustrating, depressing and painful time, and a time to redefine goals. It was also during this time that he did a great deal of the writing that has been preserved. After several months, Bruce instituted his own recovery program and began walking, gingerly at first, and gradually built up his strength. He was determined that he would do his beloved gung fu again. As can be seen by his later films, he did recover full use of his body, but he constantly had to take measures like icing, massage and rest to take care of his back."

    If you want to read the rest of Bruce Lee's biography, here is the page - http://www.brucelee.com/bruceleecom/file/biography.pdf

    This article should reinforce the need to stretch & warm-up before starting your regular martial arts training. Here are the wiki sections on stretching and warm-up exercises:

    Stretches - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/stretching
    Warm-Up Exercises - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/warm-up-exercises

    Members - Please use this post in order to discuss the training injuries that you have experienced over the years.

    Will
    Black Belt Wiki
      • 2
      Andy 4 broken toes (not all at once) broken left hand, fractured right elbow, broken right shin (just below the knee), broken right and left knuckles (more than once) and lots of minor lumps and bumps. And that's just my training (and MA combat) related injuries lol when I was in my late teens,my 20's and early 30's I thought I was invincible , losing that fight with 2 forklift trucks brought me down to earth with a bump and now in my 40's I am starting to feel the old battle wounds that never used to bother me before.
      • 2
      Rachel DS I broke my right little toe in a sweeps class (my toe stayed put and I got swept).....I was kind of in denial so I taped it and continued training. Adrenaline and endophins are a wonderful pain killer. Unfortunately that afternoon when they wore off I realised it was broken - that and I could barely walk....lol. I was devo that I would probably have to stop for 2-3 months while it healed but after a chat to my sensei x 3 realised I could still train with a few mods. Actually I was surprised how much I could still do. I taped it all the time initially and then just for training. I couldn't run for about 6 weeks and couldn't sit in seiza for a couple of weeks. I couldn't impact kick on that side for 10-12 weeks and my balance was a little off on that foot for a while but I still managed to train pretty hard. I even kept doing kumite classes. I did lots of mental practice too - which I agree with [171786,Christopher Adamchek] is still a really important part of training. I use it a lot normally - like going through kata in my head when I wake up early and can't get back to sleep or at night before I go to sleep - it relaxes me :) etc.
      • 1
      John I have had broken fingers. But the most painful was a bone bruise that I got from a flying back kick. Our school had these crazy heavy bags with a metal base so they could rock back into place when hit. Of course, as I was landing, my leg crashed into the sharp metal base. That bone bruise lasted for weeks. Still have a scar from that one.
    • 4 more comments
    • 3
    Diet & Martial Arts Training
    Over the years, I have noticed how my diet has changed from a Western meat-oriented diet to a more Asian veggie-oriented diet. I did it in order to lose weight and thus speed up my techniques, make my flying kicks higher, etc. Also I wanted more energy as I felt sluggish (after dinner) when training in the evening.

    Of course, it could also be as I got older, I got a little smarter. Fast food hamburgers are not conducive to a long & healthy life. :)

    Will
    Black Belt Wiki
      • 3
      Andy [172080,Rachel DS], I am stock piling lamb chops as we speak lol.
      • 2
      Andy [172230,Superamazingbadgerman], so irradiated veggies are safe? Gamma radiation? I don't want my broccoli getting angry and smashing up my kitchen! Seriously though it just goes to show that not enough knowledge or misinformation can be a dangerous thing. I know there are many organic compounds 'poisons' that can be very deadly and not all preservatives are bad but still I prefer to have my food as close to its natural state as possible both meat and veg.
      • 2
      Superamazingbadgerman [172080,Rachel DS] I suppose you could start with this.

      http://ucanr.org/sites/Zann_test/files/28711.pdf

      The key to understanding preservatives and pesticides(and how bad they really are. Some are really nice, and some are REALLY nasty) is to take talk about them in context. People who report about them or try to make you paranoid quote some chemist's chemistry language. What they fail to do is give you the context that chemist and the audience they intended to reach learned for at least 4 years.

      In order to judge how dangerous something is, you need to look at what's in the name, NOT HOW SCARY IT SOUNDS. For example, di-hydrogen monoxide, a polar chemical formed in combustion that can kill you from over-exposure, is just water. Every time people hear their kids get exposed to it every day, though, they panic.

      In contrast, some of the most dangerous things you can take into your body are organic compounds. All the word "organic" means means is they have hydrogen bonded to carbon in them. Toluenes for example, being some of the most organic compounds you can find, will happily kill off every single one of your brain cells after a few whiffs.

      Basically, what I'm saying is if you really want these chemists' point of view, you gotta be willing to do a pretty good amount of research on the stuff you don't understand. If you don't, phrases like "gamma radiation treatment" are gonna scare you off pretty easily, and that kind of thing is about as safe as it gets. :/
    • 27 more comments
    • 3
    What are some good lateral movement drills?
    I want to improve my ability to move laterally in order to avoid an attack during sparring and position myself for a better counterattack. Any ideas for good lateral footwork drills?
      • 2
      Andy John I know you are not a big fan of pre arranged forms lol but the ippon Gumite (one step sparring) forms of Wado Ryu are an excellent set of techniques that use Tai Sabaki to evade and counter an opponent.
      • 1
      Rachel DS I forget the name of the one we do a lot. It basically takes you fw bw Sw to left an right and 45 deg fw and bw to left and right. Also prearranged sparring drills where you block, tai sabaki to side or angle and counter with gyaku zuki or similar. Did a good one recently which incorporated distancing well.
      • 1
      Will - Black Belt Wiki Chris has an excellent point about the ability to move diagonally in sparring.

      In addition to agility drills (to help you move laterally & diagonally), you should also do some plyometrics drills (in order to move "explosively" into the correct position). If you are too slow, the "correct" spot for a sparring counterattack doesn't last too long. :)

      Here is the plyometrics section on the wiki - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/plyometrics

      Look for the drills that focus on your legs.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
    • 5 more comments
    • 2
    Plyometric Leg Exercises for Martial Arts Kicking Speed & Power
    Since a number of our members were discussing exercises to improve their kicking power and speed, I thought that I would post a video of plyometric leg exercises. Professional athletes use plyometrics in order to develop more "explosive" power and faster starts.

    Here is the wiki's page on plyometrics - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/plyometrics

    Will
    Black Belt Wiki
    • 2
    Board Breaking
    We break boards in class and for tests. It actually seems to be my strong suit and I happen to enjoy it. At least, when the board breaks it is quite satisfying. I got myself a fresh new re-breakable board recently. It's not been broken in (no pun intended) so it's very stiff and hard to break. Since then I get a bruise everytime I use it and it is quite painful. I notice that I seem to be hesitant when going to break it now because of the pain factor which use to never stop me before. What are you thoughts on board breaking? Is it useful in any way? How do you get past the small fear of the pain?
    Thanks for sharing!
      • 1
      Dave Magliano I practiced board breaking (tamawashi) in my 20s and early 30s. I still have a rebreakable board I bring out in class every couple of years and have my students take turns using it. After everyone gets a chance, I ask a few simple questions:
      What does this do for you in terms of your ability to deal with an aggressive person?
      How much power does it really take to break a non-moving target?
      How much training time are you willing to use in order to effectively break boards, bats, blocks of ice, etc., without causing permanent damage to your hands and feet?
      What specifically does this prove to you?
      These are the questions I started asking myself years ago. Personally, I am much more impressed with someone who has mastered their technique in such a way that he/she barely has to use it. That's where the real power is.
      • 1
      Will - Black Belt Wiki Some styles (i.e. Taekwondo & Kyokushin Karate) find breaking useful. Other styles follow the "don't hit back" philosophy and dislike breaking.

      Maybe some of our Kyokushin members like [212430,James] would like to give some "official" Kyokushin thoughts on breaking (as this Karate style differs from many other Karate styles in regards to the value of breaking).

      Will
      • 1
      Michael My 2 cents regarding board breaking is that is mostly a gimmick to make demonstrations look cool and excite potential students. Of course, it is also a test of skill and proper technique. But, as Bruce Lee stated in Enter the Dragon "boards don't hit back." Don't get me wrong. I am not against board breaking, but I see it more for promotion of the dojo or used in promotion testing.

      In my younger years, I have had my fair share of bad break attempts. I found that the hesitation I developed caused me to make more mistakes with my technique. I have never used the re-breakable boards, so I can't really comment on those. It makes sense to use different colors as part of promotion testing as it would show improvement of technique with the more difficult boards.
    • 7 more comments
    • 2
    Fun strength & conditioning "games" for kids
    It is hard to get kids to do a million push-ups or mountain climbers in order to boost their strength and stamina. So martial arts school often "hide" strength & conditioning exercises in games for younger students.

    For example, some schools hold bear crawl races - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/bear-crawl

    What are some other great ideas to entertain kids while disguising useful strength & conditioning exercises?

    Will
    Black Belt Wiki
      • 1
      Andy [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki], this ones more of a conditioning exercise, it's called 'Uncle Andy's Bokken piniata' first you choose a lucky volunteer then you hang them in a burlap sack and all of the other kids beat them with a Bokken until candy comes out (which takes a while as there is no candy in the sack unless the lucky volunteers name happens to be 'Candy' :)
      • 1
      Kim Cupid shuffle plank workout (also seen a cha Cha one). You're in a plank and follow the line dance steps in unison. It is a Looong song. Our competition team does this workout and I got to do it one day when I volunteered to spar. We may have also done it in adults class one night. We actually walk the plank around so we switch directions (most of the videos I saw do not do this). It is fun but tiring.
      • 1
      Will - Black Belt Wiki Wheel barrow races are also a fun strength & conditioning exercise. This is where a partner will hold the legs of a student and the student must use his/her arms to "walk/run" to the finish line.
    • 5 more comments
    • 2
    Legs flexibility
    What are important things to consider while doing leg splits training ? And what are things to avoid in our daily activities ?
    I need ur opinions.
      • 1
      Andy Hi [241486,Roger Ramer] and welcome to the community, the most important thing to consider is to not overstretch yourself and to take stretching (and all other conditioning) gradually and ideally under professional supervision, also it is vital to warm up before even attempting vigorous stretching or in any other way putting excessive strain or tension on any muscles, tendons or ligaments (especially if you are not as young or flexible as you once were like me lol), obviously in a real situation you don't have time to warm up or stretch but years of doing so in training does make one more supple/flexible and able to perform various techniques with less chance of injury (though I do state 'less' as opposed to no injury :)
      • 1
      Will - Black Belt Wiki Hi Roger

      This past community topic looks at leg splits - http://community.blackbeltwiki.com/post/5994816/stretching-splits

      It has some good advice on how to improve your splits and links to wiki pages focused on stretches for splits.

      Will
      • 1
      Superamazingbadgerman Flexibility is one of the hardest types of conditioning to nail down. That's because it's a combination between the maximum extension of your muscle, the length of your tendons, and how well you keep those pesky antagonist muscles out of the way for the motion (which is usually the part everyone overlooks and walks all over me for because I've found it to be the most important element to train and someone told them flexibility is about pulling your muscles out and making them as long as possible and then ignoring how they behave for everything else in your life...).

      So basically for maximum effect, you should relax into it (letting your tension flow away like you're meditating), feel a gentle pull, and don't force the stretch. I THINK that's what I'm saying...

      Anyway, to answer your question, splits put a very high load on your tendons. This is fine if you do them with good form, but you never EVER want to crack your hip joint or knee joint doing the splits (trust me. I did it a few times, and it sucks).

      Cracking your joints occurs when a tendon (or more than one tendon) is not aligned in its proper position. With enough force, it either restricts your range of motion and threatens to cause you pain, or returns to its natural position with a snap.

      If you load up that tendon with as much energy as the splits gives it, it will snap back with a quite significant amount of force and, more likely than not, hurt you.

      I'd say if you have bad hips or you're not good at feeling when your limits are or when you may need to adjust your leg/hip, the splits are not a very good exercise for you.

      As long as you're feeling a stretch in your muscles as opposed to a pull in your tendons (and you stop when you either start to feel that pull or the stretch is too much for you), you should be fine.
    • 1 more comment
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    Balance training for martial artists
    I have just added another great balance exercise to the wiki's balance training section - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/martial-arts-balance-exercises

    This exercise involves standing on one leg and catching a ball without putting your foot down - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/ball-toss-balance-training

    If you know any more balance exercises not listed on the wiki, please let me know.

    Also do you think that martial artists should perform additional balance training or does regular martial arts training provide enough balance work on its own?

    Will
    Black Belt Wiki
      • 1
      Andy https://youtu.be/QbvbIN0nN7A
      • 1
      Richie I find I never needed "balance training." The practice of kicks, kata, and "always training" has given me great balance. I use my limited training time else wear. The same goes for speed.
      • 1
      Christopher Adamchek Bo sparring on a balance beam is a good drill ;)
    • 6 more comments
    • 2
    How has martial arts training helped you physically (esp. with your normal every...
    Has martial arts training significantly improved your overall physical fitness? Are you stronger? More flexible? Lost weight? Better reaction times? More agile? Extra energy at work?

    I am not asking about improvement in your martial arts skills or power. Rather, I am asking how has martial arts training helped you with your normal everyday physical fitness.

    How has it improved your life (physically) during the non-martial arts portion of the day? Is the lifting of your kids or groceries easier? Are you less tired after a long day at work? Has it helped your weekend sports activities (i.e. tennis)?

    Perhaps you would also like to discuss your fitness before you started martial arts training and compare it to your current level of martial arts-assisted physical fitness.

    Will
    Black Belt Wiki
      • 2
      Ray I am 61 and a full-time carer. Martial arts gave helped me cope with back and hip issues by making me more physically resilient. In addition, the mental side if training helps me with anger and depression issues, as well as helping me cope with constant pain. I love it!
      • 2
      Guillaume Chan Cardio is improving with the frequency of my training. Flexibility is getting better but not so much, Surely because I only stretch at the end of my trainings. I should really stretch everyday if I want to improve this part.

      I have more control on my balance. Time we spend on getting good position, good balance has a positive effect on my everyday life for sure. Now, for example, I'm more capable of standing up in the bus without holding the handles while reading. Ahah

      But it's definitively on the mental side that I have gained the most, attitude, self-confidence ...
      • 2
      Andy [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki], everything you have mentioned (strength, flexibility, weight management, agility, stamina/endurance) and more. I started young (aged 12) so can't really comment on before and after (though as a child I was more Cartman than Stan if you get my drift :) . I have already told the story on here before (but I'll do so again for the benefit of new members) that during recovery and physiotherapy for the incident where I had my leg/ankle crushed I was asked by a physiotherapist if I was a ballet dancer!!! (Hence my and [172080,Rachel DS]'s long running joke about me wearing a tutu :) as I was told I still had better plantar flexion in my
      (damaged/bionic) ankle than most
      people she had seen have normally.
    • 15 more comments




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