Physical Fitness

    • 4
    Non-traditional martial arts strength training
    Jesse Encamp posted the below video for a strength training program he has which is designed around Karate.

    https://youtu.be/fO0XIENrCfs

    Not trying to undercut his product, do you have any non-traditional exercises/workouts designed with your MA in mind?
      • 2
      Richie Make a slosh bar. I used the black pipe because it is thicker and the glue is cheaper. You can also get the screw on caps to remove or add water or other things. I put rocks in mine sometimes.

      Great for balance work, forearms, and sticky hands training (moving with the water)

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bA8ATctYX90
      • 2
      Ray When I was in the military we would pull duses around a field, one time we moved several thousand sand bags for p.t. I imagine Imy self doing something similar in the near future.
      • 0 2 votes
      • Reply
      • 2
      James I tend to go through phases of doing "odd stuff" (description courtesy of my wife). At the moment i'm doing a lot of "odd stuff" to strengthen the core like abdominal planks with 110 - 130lb of weight on my back held for 3 reps of between 1 min - 1 min 30 The reason for the weight differences is mainly which one of my son or daughter to sit on my back :) I spend a fair bit of time in head stand doing upside down splits and leg raises and for cardio i'm doing 100 full burpees within a five minute time frame every couple of days. I also do lots of press up variations, elevated, vertical, weighted ( again courtesy of the kids!), one armed, diamond, etc, etc.
    • 13 more comments
    • 3
    Functional Exercise Drills - Kettlebell, Medicine Ball, Reaction Ball, etc.
    Following up on [209161,Vik Khanna] 's thoughtful post about functional exercises, I am continuing to build out the wiki's fitness sections on "functional" exercises that simultaneously build strength & coordination for a wide range of muscles... and better simulate actual martial arts movements (versus lifting a weight and focusing on a single muscle).

    Just added reaction ball drills today - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/reaction-ball

    Other "functional" sections:
    http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/martial-arts-physical-fitness
    http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/martial-arts-reaction-speed-drills
    http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/medicine-ball-workouts
    http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/kettlebell-workouts
    http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/martial-arts-agility
    and many others.

    I will try to build these out further as some need more drills, etc.

    Will
    Black Belt Wiki
    • 3
    Flexibility in martial arts
    Hi!!

    How important would you rate being flexible in martial arts? and how flexible?

    As a former gymnastics practicioner I miss this a little, though there is acrobacy involved in a martial art I do. However, not comparable to gymnastics.
    I also heard from my karate instructor that too much flexibility causes loss of stability and vice versa. What are your thoughts about that?

    timothy
      • 1
      Vik Khanna I think flexibility is a somewhat outmoded concept. It conjures visions of people (like gymnasts) doing splits and other shudder-inducing moves. Flexibility is defined as the range of motion of a joint. The overwhelming majority of people have a normal range of motion of their joints. But, that doesn't mean they can do a whole lot with that range.

      I like more the notion of mobility, which, simply stated, is the usefulness of that range of motion. If you have a full ROM, but can exert force only through the middle of the range (when the muscle is in the strongest phase of contraction), then you will be limited in your mobility in highly technical movement pursuits like martial arts which often call upon practitioners to be forceful in unconventional postures and at unusual body angles.

      Strength coach Dan John says it best when he notes, "you only need to be as flexible as you need to be." Working on strengthening muscles and connective tissues throughout the ROM continuum, along with dynamic flexibility moves (long-hold static stretching is also quite out moded), is more likely to produce sustainable improved mobility than most other strategies.
      • 1
      Andy As for being 'too' flexible, never agree to pay for the meal after the 3rd date! :)
      • 1
      Andy Thanks [176815,Alex] that sounds very sensible :) One of the reasons I have been out of action for a while has been a bad knee sprain which has taken me a couple of months to recover from (though this was a work not MA related injury) I am SO glad to see the back of that compression strap! :)
    • 9 more comments
    • 3
    How important is physical fitness to a martial art?
    I've trained with all sorts of body types, from big to small and everything in between. I train BJJ, and though it is a very physically demanding MA, it doesn't seem like you have to be that physically fit to do it. I'm skinny but I definitely do not have an athlete's physique. I can understand how being more in shape would be conducive to being able to train more often, for example: I can spar for 3 hours, only requiring breaks to get water, and be fine. Is this because I'm fit or because my body is conditioned to sparring for long periods of time every week? Thoughts?
      • 3
      Andrea Harkins "The Martial Arts Woman" I weight train 2-3 times a week and take aerobic classes, too. I've always been attracted to working out diligently and have always had a variety of fitness activities in my life to keep me challenged, along with my martial art and it does help me in my martial art, as well. Strength, flexibility, and endurance from these other work-outs translate directly into my karate and my teaching.
      • 2
      Alex [171786,Christopher Adamchek] unfortunately no, he doc basically forbade him from doing any more martial arts, so now he does cycling. When he does something he goes all in so he has a super fancy bike and all the bike outfit things.
      • 2
      Rachel DS I was pretty fit when I started MA (karate) but I would have to say that the sort of fitness I had was different to what I now have after training for 16 months. I would say that it was helpful to have cardiovascular fitness (which I still have) and a good core (probably even better now) and good flexibility / balance (as I do yoga too) but karate requires a lot more anaerobic activity than I was used to and it took me a while to train my anaerobic fitness. Also the level of / type of muscle strength is different. I have found I have completely changed shape over the last 12 months. I have actually gained weight (through muscle) and my legs and arms are way bigger and more defined than when I was just doing cardio / weights training - I feel stronger too. My plyometrics and hence fast twitch fibres are way better and my reflexes / reaction time feels quicker. The good thing I find about having / keeping my cardio fitness is that when I spar against people who are not so fit in that regard (which is quite a few) they tire a lot quicker and recover a lot slower than me and I can use that to my advantage if I play the right game with them. [176815,Alex] We don't do a lot of rolling but on the few occasions that we have I have found it quite taxing (kind of distracted from it at the time and only really noticed the heavy breathing when I stopped) but I can see that being physically fit from a cardio perspective there would be a distinct advantage provided you also have some tactics (which I don't really - something I would like to try more of in future....one of my Sensei also trains BJJ and one of the other guys does some Judo so perhaps we may do some in class again one day).
    • 9 more comments
    • 3
    Bruce Lee & Martial Arts Injuries
    Given our discussion about how people can be forced to temporarily halt martial arts training due to injuries, I just wanted to say even martial arts legends have suffered this fate.

    Here is a passage from Bruce Lee's biography - "It was actually his zealousness that led to an injury that was to become a chronic source of pain for the rest of his life. On a day in 1970, without warming up, something he always did, Bruce picked up a 125-pound barbell and did a “good morning” exercise. That consists of resting the barbell on one’s shoulders and bending straight over at the waist. After much pain and many tests, it was determined that he had sustained an injury to the fourth sacral nerve. He was ordered to complete bed rest and told that undoubtedly he would never do gung fu again. For the next six months, Bruce stayed in bed. It was an extremely frustrating, depressing and painful time, and a time to redefine goals. It was also during this time that he did a great deal of the writing that has been preserved. After several months, Bruce instituted his own recovery program and began walking, gingerly at first, and gradually built up his strength. He was determined that he would do his beloved gung fu again. As can be seen by his later films, he did recover full use of his body, but he constantly had to take measures like icing, massage and rest to take care of his back."

    If you want to read the rest of Bruce Lee's biography, here is the page - http://www.brucelee.com/bruceleecom/file/biography.pdf

    This article should reinforce the need to stretch & warm-up before starting your regular martial arts training. Here are the wiki sections on stretching and warm-up exercises:

    Stretches - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/stretching
    Warm-Up Exercises - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/warm-up-exercises

    Members - Please use this post in order to discuss the training injuries that you have experienced over the years.

    Will
    Black Belt Wiki
      • 2
      Andy 4 broken toes (not all at once) broken left hand, fractured right elbow, broken right shin (just below the knee), broken right and left knuckles (more than once) and lots of minor lumps and bumps. And that's just my training (and MA combat) related injuries lol when I was in my late teens,my 20's and early 30's I thought I was invincible , losing that fight with 2 forklift trucks brought me down to earth with a bump and now in my 40's I am starting to feel the old battle wounds that never used to bother me before.
      • 2
      Rachel DS I broke my right little toe in a sweeps class (my toe stayed put and I got swept).....I was kind of in denial so I taped it and continued training. Adrenaline and endophins are a wonderful pain killer. Unfortunately that afternoon when they wore off I realised it was broken - that and I could barely walk....lol. I was devo that I would probably have to stop for 2-3 months while it healed but after a chat to my sensei x 3 realised I could still train with a few mods. Actually I was surprised how much I could still do. I taped it all the time initially and then just for training. I couldn't run for about 6 weeks and couldn't sit in seiza for a couple of weeks. I couldn't impact kick on that side for 10-12 weeks and my balance was a little off on that foot for a while but I still managed to train pretty hard. I even kept doing kumite classes. I did lots of mental practice too - which I agree with [171786,Christopher Adamchek] is still a really important part of training. I use it a lot normally - like going through kata in my head when I wake up early and can't get back to sleep or at night before I go to sleep - it relaxes me :) etc.
      • 1
      John I have had broken fingers. But the most painful was a bone bruise that I got from a flying back kick. Our school had these crazy heavy bags with a metal base so they could rock back into place when hit. Of course, as I was landing, my leg crashed into the sharp metal base. That bone bruise lasted for weeks. Still have a scar from that one.
    • 4 more comments
    • 3
    Diet & Martial Arts Training
    Over the years, I have noticed how my diet has changed from a Western meat-oriented diet to a more Asian veggie-oriented diet. I did it in order to lose weight and thus speed up my techniques, make my flying kicks higher, etc. Also I wanted more energy as I felt sluggish (after dinner) when training in the evening.

    Of course, it could also be as I got older, I got a little smarter. Fast food hamburgers are not conducive to a long & healthy life. :)

    Will
    Black Belt Wiki
      • 3
      Andy [172080,Rachel DS], I am stock piling lamb chops as we speak lol.
      • 2
      Andy [172230,Superamazingbadgerman], so irradiated veggies are safe? Gamma radiation? I don't want my broccoli getting angry and smashing up my kitchen! Seriously though it just goes to show that not enough knowledge or misinformation can be a dangerous thing. I know there are many organic compounds 'poisons' that can be very deadly and not all preservatives are bad but still I prefer to have my food as close to its natural state as possible both meat and veg.
      • 2
      Superamazingbadgerman [172080,Rachel DS] I suppose you could start with this.

      http://ucanr.org/sites/Zann_test/files/28711.pdf

      The key to understanding preservatives and pesticides(and how bad they really are. Some are really nice, and some are REALLY nasty) is to take talk about them in context. People who report about them or try to make you paranoid quote some chemist's chemistry language. What they fail to do is give you the context that chemist and the audience they intended to reach learned for at least 4 years.

      In order to judge how dangerous something is, you need to look at what's in the name, NOT HOW SCARY IT SOUNDS. For example, di-hydrogen monoxide, a polar chemical formed in combustion that can kill you from over-exposure, is just water. Every time people hear their kids get exposed to it every day, though, they panic.

      In contrast, some of the most dangerous things you can take into your body are organic compounds. All the word "organic" means means is they have hydrogen bonded to carbon in them. Toluenes for example, being some of the most organic compounds you can find, will happily kill off every single one of your brain cells after a few whiffs.

      Basically, what I'm saying is if you really want these chemists' point of view, you gotta be willing to do a pretty good amount of research on the stuff you don't understand. If you don't, phrases like "gamma radiation treatment" are gonna scare you off pretty easily, and that kind of thing is about as safe as it gets. :/
    • 27 more comments
    • 3
    What are some good lateral movement drills?
    I want to improve my ability to move laterally in order to avoid an attack during sparring and position myself for a better counterattack. Any ideas for good lateral footwork drills?
      • 2
      Andy John I know you are not a big fan of pre arranged forms lol but the ippon Gumite (one step sparring) forms of Wado Ryu are an excellent set of techniques that use Tai Sabaki to evade and counter an opponent.
      • 1
      Rachel DS I forget the name of the one we do a lot. It basically takes you fw bw Sw to left an right and 45 deg fw and bw to left and right. Also prearranged sparring drills where you block, tai sabaki to side or angle and counter with gyaku zuki or similar. Did a good one recently which incorporated distancing well.
      • 1
      Will - Black Belt Wiki Chris has an excellent point about the ability to move diagonally in sparring.

      In addition to agility drills (to help you move laterally & diagonally), you should also do some plyometrics drills (in order to move "explosively" into the correct position). If you are too slow, the "correct" spot for a sparring counterattack doesn't last too long. :)

      Here is the plyometrics section on the wiki - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/plyometrics

      Look for the drills that focus on your legs.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
    • 5 more comments
    • 2
    Calorie burning workouts needed
    Friends, I am looking for full body workouts to shred pounds that will complement my twice a week Karate Dojo training. I look forward to hearing your words of wisdom as always. David
      • 2
      Michael I replaced soda with water and it made a huge difference. (This was supposed to be a reply to [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki] post. Not sure what happened)
      • 0 2 votes
      • Reply
      • 1
      Ray Cardio light Weights many reps and cardio. Diet is key though
      • 1
      Will - Black Belt Wiki David

      Unfortunately, you have to also worry about the other side of the calorie equation - what is going in (versus what you are burning off). You will need to look at your diet to see what "easy" calories that you can cut off. This will help any pound shedding workout to be more successful.

      Depending on a person's size, etc., the calories in one beer roughly equals the calories burnt off by running 1 mile at a 6 mph pace. So if you can, try to combine any workouts with a better diet (i.e. less calorie packed snacks & drinks).

      Will
      • 0 1 vote
      • Reply
    • 4 more comments
    • 2
    Agility Ladder Drills to Improve Martial Arts Footwork
    Martial artists need great footwork and agility in order to evade attacks and to position themselves in order to hit an opponent. This skill is essential for sparring, self-defense, etc.

    This video goes over 30 different agility ladder drills that you can add to your individual workout or to your martial arts class "warm-up". They range from beginner drills to advanced agility ladder drills.

    What do you do in order to improve your (or your students') footwork and agility? Or do you ignore this aspect of martial arts training?

    Will
    Black Belt Wiki
      • 2
      Andy [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki], great video with some excellent exercises. As well as the Tai sabaki associated with Wado, Kobudo and bujutsu one of my favourites is the X pattern drill (where you imagine or draw an X on the floor and practice stepping,shuffling leaping and lunging from one point to another) actually although it is called the X (or cross) pattern drill, I suppose asterisk pattern drill would be more appropriate as you also practice shifting backwards forwards and left to right as well as on the diagonal, this is taken from boxing (which has some excellent footwork drills. Here are a couple of videos of more boxing footwork drills https://youtu.be/ZMEf9xnfmRU
      https://youtu.be/Pl2Ig8eGkFo
      https://youtu.be/UF1OOCDdR1c
    • 2 more comments
    • 2
    How Important Is Strength, Conditioning And Overall Fitness In Martial Arts?
    As a percentage or on a scale of 1-10, how important would you rate strength, conditioning and fitness? Is it as important as technique? If not why not? And if so how so?
      • 2
      Vik Khanna It's a 10 in terms of value. As the new conditioning coach for the Missouri Karate Association (MoKarate.com), my job is to help all our athletes improve their strength, power, and endurance using a broad range of tools from kettlebells to body weight training to plyometrics to sprinting. The is a hard core of traditionalists who eschew conditioning under the false belief that stronger or bigger = slower. This is, obvisouly, untrue. In no professional sport are today's athletes slower, smaller, or less powerful than their predecessors. Everyone is bigger, faster, stronger, through a matrix of reasons from evolution to self selection to targeted athletic recruitment to training and nutrition. You don't have to like the NFL to gaze in wonder at the physical capacity of NFL athletes. Go luck up the performance data of great players of decades ago (such as Gale Sayers) and compare his data to Barry Sanders or Steven Jackson. It's not even close which athletes have greater capacity. Physical capacity is also one of the great equalizers in sport. You cannot change your genes, but you can turn certain genes on or off via training, and training is the only way to maximize your capacity and give yourself an additional physical (and mental) resource that you can transport over to your martial art.
      • 1
      PAUL (paldo) REYNOLDS Hi @ Will-BB Wiki: "Polymetrics" is a good point, it perhaps is more modern than isometrics, but for me it addressed the particular strengthening of the fingers, wrists and tricepts for my specific training, that increased strength in grappling, especially blocking, and use of hands in universal ways. It helped me to match the greater dans in sparring, example, 2nd v.s. 4th dan, 3rd vs. 5th dan. I've noticed that balance was not just good enough and I needed something more and that was hand and arm strength to ward-off the incoming. Soon the aches and pains in the forearms and hands became less hurt and soar to call it an accomplishment. Psychologically, I pretty much kept up with the higher ranks even though I was lower in rank. Dojo sparring in matching even was satisfaction in not loosing face in kumite, but gaining self-respect was the issue regardless of rank ! I liked the challenges of higher rank that made me learn to recognize my mistakes, and work on them for the next kumite match. I look at failure as learning to overcome ! not just in karate, but in life !
      • 1
      PAUL (paldo) REYNOLDS ISOMETRICS is great for strengthing and it doesn't cause weight gain. Chinese push-ups is my prefered method for strengthening your fingers, wrists, and tricepts which is needed for karate strikes and blocks. You shoud also include regular puch-ups for they are good for general arm and wrist strength only. I would recommend reasearching isometrics on the internet for various methods that apply to your karate training by increasing repetitions gradually at every other day practice intervals, and drinking water after and before practices for internal fluidity which is very important to the internal strained body parts in preventing injuries. No great amount of water before practices, it causes you to urine during practice, but do have plenty of water slowly to prevent cramping following practices for it prevents soreness and is healthy. Some Japanese dojos include isometrics, but if it doesn't home exercising is recommended. I would not recommend to pay for isometrics lessons, you can use the internet to train yourself...go easy at first and gradually increase is safe ! save the money! I have been very successful with isometrics in over 30 yrs of Shotokan, Shorin-ryu, and Taekwondo karate training without any major injuries caused by isomatrics ! My major injuries were caused by kumite, grappling, and incorrect kicking techniques on a very hard large kicking bag, and breaking ice, wood, and concrete blocks with my head, hands, elbows, and feet, while serious bruises were caused by mostly bamboo. Serious karate-ka will accept there injuries INTRINSICALLY, mend the wounds, and return to the field to conquer more ! ... The spirit of a Japanese warrior !
      • 0 1 vote
      • Reply
    • 28 more comments
    • 2
    Push ups in class?
    I have one style of karate that does push ups in every class and the other doesn't do any at all and discourages it because of insurance reasons.

    I didn't initially like doing push ups in class but after 18 months I'm a lot fitter so now I actually enjoy doing push ups. If I don't do push ups in class chances of me doing them at home are slim.

    What are your thoughts on doing push ups, benefits etc, for martial arts training?
      • 3
      Andy Like [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki] and @James I'm a fan, also push ups have been a part of the warm up in every karate dojo and most other dojo I have ever attended (on knuckles in Shotokan and Wado). I think it is sad that what to me is an essential part of the conditioning aspect of martial arts would be done away with for insurance/health and safety issues, they'll be taking out punching and kicking next!!' :)
      • 2
      James Thought id share this on this thread. I was recently challenged to do 22 push ups each day in support of PTSD in support of ex servicemen by an ex military friend of mine. and felt straightforward push ups insufficiently challenging Some of these are a reular feature of my training, some I had never tried before but will definitely work on and use again.<iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fjames.hunt.7583992%2Fvideos%2F1261007690589992%2F&show_text=0&width=560"
      • 0 2 votes
      • Reply
      • 2
      Rachel DS We do them occasionally only but not as a grading requirement. The dojo I first went we did them every class with line sprints and I didn't mind. We often do them at the end of a sparring claßs I go to at another dojo but not always. I tend to do them at home in wod program so can always do some. I can see the benefit but I would rather spend my valuable dojo time on kihon and kata.
    • 8 more comments
    • 2
    How much is too much with endurance training?
    First, happy new year to everyone!

    I have a question for you all. I've been back in Martial arts for about six months now, love it! I've noticed I have two things to work on (well, more than two...) one is stretching and the other is strength in my legs.

    I know I can stretch every day. But I've been doing things like laying down side kicks (that burn!) and have been wondering can I do those every day, or is it best to have a rest day in between? I've been doing sets like 32/16/8/4 each leg. I feel it!

    I know with weights I need to have a rest day, but is that the same with this kind of endurance training? I know a lack of strength (endurance) is interfering with my technique...oh to be young again!

    As always, any suggestions greatly appreciated.
      • 2
      Superamazingbadgerman I personally would suggest you don't train to exhaustion.

      You should probably do a light warm up (NOTHING CRAZY) until you've worked yourself to a sweat or your legs feel warmed up and energized. After that, do your stretches and go on to your endurance exercises.

      BE SURE YOU'RE BREATHING THROUGH THEM!!!!! If you don't, you WILL get tired and you WILL NOT get the biggest bang for your buck.

      Now, to actually answer the question!

      When you lift your leg and kick like that, it's like weight training. That means you probably should do rest days if you don't want to experience a break down period (since you're older, the breakdown will be worse and take longer to recover from than a 19 year old kid like me).

      When you take your "rest" days, that doesn't actually mean you rest on these days. Instead, you should be doing light exercises, like cardio or something. I would just leave that bit out, but so many people just take those days completely off, it needs to be said
      • 1
      Jeramiah Too much endurance training? No such thing!
      • 1
      Will - Black Belt Wiki Hi [183970,David Ianetta]

      Hope you had a great holiday!

      When you say "laying down side kicks" - Do you mean you are doing side kicks while lying sideways on the ground? You might want to try this exercise standing. If needed, you can hold on to a table or rail. It will help with your leg strength and you can aim slightly higher each time (kicking against a heavy bag) in order to work on your flexibility and targeting skills.

      If you are truly overloading your legs (i.e. combining your sidekick pyramid training with squats, leg curls, etc.), you will want to have rest days. Alternating muscle groups also helps reduce exercise burnout and boredom.

      Will
    • 1 more comment
    • 2
    stretching and sternum
    hi to all. i have a quick question about streching for 34 year old stiff body. i took bushido kai for about 2 years when i was a kid and got extremely flexible. as an adult i became very stiff. now i have a daughter in an mma class. after watching a few classes the wife and i decided to start stretching. we have been stretching for a few months now and our progress has been exceptional. i know not to expect a whole lot as flexibility isnt something that happens overnight but we are seeing great results. (it makes me feel great. i think i may be addicted.) my question is about a knot on my sternum. it feels like a sore muscle. it is very hard and only started when i started pulling on my ankles to stretch my hams while standing. i can grap my ankles but when i pull my head into my legs at the bottom of my stretch, i can really feel it. i wont call it pain, just discomfort. my legs and back feel amazing but not so much in the bread basket. i am wondering if this is common for beginners. any help is greatly appreciated.

    gggrrreat community
      • 1
      Will - Black Belt Wiki Also remember to warm-up before any exercise & stretching routine.

      You might want to add "chain breakers" to your warm-ups as it targets your chest muscles - http://www.healthywomen.org/content/article/exercises-ease-pain-and-joint-immobility
      • 1
      Will - Black Belt Wiki I am not a doctor & don't even play one on TV. :) So my upfront statement is... if there is any pain or a lump or the "discomfort" persists, please see a doctor.

      Try some extra chest stretches before you work out to see if that makes a difference. Lots of us have "problem areas" (i.e. my calves) which we need to give extra attention when stretching and before/after martial arts training.

      Here are some stretches for your chest:

      Doorway chest stretch - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/doorway-chest-stretch
      Reverse shoulder stretch - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/reverse-shoulder-stretch
      Behind the head chest stretch - http://www.exrx.net/Stretches/ChestGeneral/BehindHead.html

      Hopefully, other wiki members can add some more chest stretching routines.

      Will
    • 2
    Isometric Exercises & Martial Arts Strength Training
    Isometric exercises have been used for centuries as a martial arts strength training tool. Some examples of isometric exercises are the infamous horse riding stance, the plank, clasping both hands & pushing against each other, the isometric bicep curl and the leg lift & hold.

    I want to add a wiki section focused on isometric exercises. I am hoping that community members will provide some additional examples of isometric exercises in order to help speed development of this wiki section.

    Thanks in advance for your help.

    Will
    Black Belt Wiki
      • 2
      Andy Ok this is very simplistic but is also a great isometric exercise used in both Karate and Kung Fu, drum roll please ..... Standing on one leg! The length of time you should stand on one leg should be minutes not seconds, (and also a good punishment for unruly students)! Ok maybe I have been watching too many Jackie chan movies lately! :)
      • 1
      Helen Brilliant, thank you.
      • 1
      Helen Thanks everyone, I'll try and incorporate more in my daily routine. My main flabby bits are belly, bum and arms (triceps). I work in childcare, so I was hoping if I held my stomach in and did some bum clenches during my day at work it might help a bit. Thanks for all your replies.
    • 11 more comments
    • 2
    Some more great stair workouts
    Following up on Andy's Shaolin stair workout, here are some challenging workouts that you can do at your local stadium.

    They are great for improving your martial arts conditioning.

    Will
    Black Belt Wiki
      • 2
      Andy Wow that is one fit lady! I would need paramedics on standby if I attempted to do half of that workout!
      • 1
      Superamazingbadgerman I read "stair" as "starter" at first glance and didn't give it a second one. I have to say, it gave me a pretty good shock when I actually watched it!



All rights reserved.
Legal Disclaimer