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  • New Posts

      • 1
      Irimi Training
      "Irimi" or "entering" is primarily used and studied in aikido, though other martial arts use similar concepts.
      • 1
      Defense Against Club, Stick or Baseball Bat - Krav Maga Technique
      This video looks at how to defend against an attacker armed with a baseball bat, stick, etc.

      How does your martial arts school teach to defend against these types of attacks?

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
      • 1
      MMA vs Thai Chi (sort of)
      Here is a video that has apparently gone viral in China showing what happens when a 'self styled' Tai Chi 'master' comes up against years of dedicated MA training http://shanghaiist.com/2017/04/28/mma-vs-tai-chi.php
        • 1
        Christopher Adamchek Haha
        • 1
        James Lol. To be fair this could have happened regardless of style but reminds me I recently met a couple in their 60's. My martial arts came up in conversation and the fact that I am not yet a black belt. The gentleman i was speaking to with all seriousness informed me that his wife isca black sash in tai chi so i have a while to go before i could take her on. Rather than challenge her to a fight to the death i simply smiled and agreed that i had met more than my match 😅
      • 2 more comments
      • 1
      Who can punch faster than Bruce Lee
      Interesting video regarding the speed of Bruce Lee's punches and comparing him to fast punching people nowadays.
      • 3
      Martial Arts Burnout & Recovering Lost Students
      We have talked about martial arts "burnout". This is when a student take an extended break or leaves martial arts entirely due to work/family problems, issues with time commitment, injuries or a wide variety of other causes.

      How does your school deal with students taking an extended break from training and how does your school eventually recover these students?

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        Joe Bramblett Discourage less important activities like jobs, school or families.
        • 1
        Hermit I'm in small town, so you end up seeing them around most times. Some come back and the break did them good, some never come back. You can sometime see it in the student before they go, you know as soon as you hear them talking about a break that they won't be back. Try to keep a friendly relationship if you see them around, but don't talk about the club everytime you see them, we love to talk about our passion, but can seem pushy to other!
        On that note one thing that doesn't hurt is a summer break or a xmas break. As much as we all "should" practice over these times, sometimes it's just needed some time away to remember why you love to do these crazy things we do lol.
        My family has gotten totally immersed in our club, my son joined, I lasted 2 weeks on the sidelines then I had to get back into it (after about 20 yrs). My wife then started helping with the ofc, which she pretty much runs now, and she just got her yellow belt (she's been through some shoulder injuries and surgeries, so she has been limited off the mats until recently) so after running all through last summer (club shut down the summer before) with the exception of 2 weeks we were gone and 2 weeks at xmas, we're going on sometime like 19 months straight, and my son's really starting to hit that wall were he needs a break, can't blame him he's been a really good sport about it ! So it's time for a summer break! I said I wasn't practicing or teaching over the summer so the owner agreed to closing for the summer, just gonna run a couple self defence classes, maybe.. Gotta avoid getting summer gut, but gonna enjoy some free time!! and knowing me I'll be stircrazy to get back to it by sept, but hopefully it puts a bit more spark to my little guy, (not like he isn't gonna come flying at me with a sidekick everyday in the backyard anyway! lol).
        • 1
        Guillaume Chan Does being friend with them and regularly checking how they are doing count ?

        This is a tough issue. I would say that using social medias to keep contact with them is a good start and posting good content such as martial arts videos or technique demonstrations might keep them motivated.

        Not an answer but your topic makes me think of another close issue that would be interesting too. I do you make sure that your students who has been injured don't come back too soon with the risk of worsening their injury ?
      • 2
      Escrima "on the rocks"
      a clip of some fun stick work with one of my students last week
      blocking close quarter butting strikes while using footwork on the rocks by the shallows of the beach

      gonna take some more environmental training videos here in the next few weeks
        • 1
        Superamazingbadgerman I love this! It's the one thing most schools won't do, and the one thing probably most important for dealing with things outside the dojo.

        I need to spend more time flopping around in the woods and on the beach and stuff myself...
        • 1
        Andy [171786,Christopher Adamchek], lol good stuff :) on a more serious note, practicing outside of a dojo environment is an excellent idea (and one that all clubs and instructors should try to implement) even if it just a summer park event or an annual club excursion to train on a beach/field/parking lot or whatever :) It not only helps break the monotony of continuous dojo training but is also helpful in practicing various techniques on terrain that is different from level interior flooring.
        • 1
        Beth Loomer I will have to find one of my friends to do things like this with. I am pretty sure my work out partner will be willing
      • 1 more comment
      • 3
      What is the biggest downside of martial arts training?
      How would you answer a potential student if they asked "What is the biggest downside of martial arts training"?

      I know that we all love martial arts training... but please do not give any answers like there are no downsides, etc. Try to point out some realistic downsides (i.e. potential for training injuries) that could help a beginner to adequately assess whether martial arts training is right for them.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 3
        KSP08 Let's see... I love it, but both of my kids fizzled out, and as an assistant, I see some of our students disappear every quarter. I think that the lack of an "off-season" can cause burnout. If kids take a "break", it seems that many don't come back to train afterwards because they worry that they've forgotten everything. Martial arts require a lot of repetition, and for many, that is boring. My son didn't care for forms, and both of my kids did not like testing. We made them stick with it for several years, but the exercise and the lessons you learn in martial arts can be learned elsewhere, so we allowed them to drop out to pursue things they enjoyed more.
        As far as adult training, you will be sore, you will get bruises and maybe injuries- several of my classmates and instructors have required surgery and I'm a frequent flier on the injury list. The perfectionist side of me can get very frustrated when advanced techniques are not learned as quickly as I'd like. In class and especially at testing, you will be publicly pushed- physically and mentally- as instructors examine and critique every part of your performance- hands, feet, weight distribution, chambers, retraction, etc. It can be stressful because you are "on stage", frequently alone- but it is just about exhilarating when you're told "good job". It can be hard to balance your desire to train with your home and work responsibilities. Despite those issues, however, you can get a great workout as well as mental stimulation from learning a martial art. I love having goals to work towards. Taekwondo expanded my social circle and gives me some "me time", which as a parent, is AWESOME.
        • 0 3 votes
        • Reply
        • 1
        Hermit ... being caught by friends or family (or sometimes strangers) looking like a complete idiot as your stepping out your new pattern, and I mean not fully doing the pattern, just running it through in your head, so they can't actually tell what you are doing, and it looks like your dancing around like a lunatic!....
        • 1
        Andy The expense of having to buy extra DIY/building materials (because you have just stacked up and broken all those concrete slabs for the patio and those roofing slates that were supposed to be for fixing the roof), the fact that whenever someone bows to you, you automatically bow back and then kick them in the face! That all of your friends and family think that you are mentally deluded and refer to you behind your back as a disillusioned, Bruce Lee wannabe halfwit, that you think that 'Walker Texas Ranger' is a soap opera, that you cant walk into a garden or DIY store without viewing all of the tools and implements for sale as potential weapons or training aids, that you view everyone who has a long moustache as an evil Kung fu warlord who was 'really' responsible for the death of your cousin Pete (and that you must now exact vengeance by brutally beating him to death using the angry Wasp nest technique) and the fact that your interest in the martial arts has caused you to join this community and waste a good minute of your life (maybe more if you are a slow reader) reading the complete crap i have just posted! :)
      • 21 more comments
      • 1
      Introduction
      Hello Everyone. Its good to see martial artist forum like this. i would like to really interact with you all and share anything of good use .
      • 1
      Tournament Results
      I asked about special tournament training and got some good answers. Well the results from the tournament I did over the weekend.

      I got 2nd place in both Blocker Sparring and Grappling. In grappling there was only me and one other competitor who happened to be a black belt in Jiu Jitsu. I was bumped up to mens black belt for all competition this weekend. There were no other women competing even at the brown belt level. I lost in sparring to my own schools Master H and one of our other Black Belts. But with luck I have inspired at least one other women about my age to compete at the next Quest of Champions so there will actually be a womans division for me to compete in. Either way though I will be competing just have to up my game more if I am going to be going against the men.

      As a school we took 27 competitors and brought home 54 swords. (1st through 3rd place) Along with 2 Grand Champion Trophies. 1 for Adult Mens Black Belt Sparring. That one was brought home by our 17 yr old black belt who had to spar our Master H. Who has been his Mentor since he was 9 yrs old. The second grand champion trophy was for adults under black belt. This is the second of that trophy that competitor has brought home back to back from that tournament series.

      It was an amazing weekend overall and our school did excellent. We have certainly left an impression with the other schools that attend these tournaments. We have only been participating in open tournaments for 1 yr and already they know that if Longview shows up they will have to work for whatever they get. Our school tends to dominate whatever divisions we enter.
        • 1
        Christopher Adamchek nice, i saw the pictures on facebook
        • 1
        Andy Hey [220307,Beth Loomer], excellent stuff :) I love the fact that your school is incorporating (and by the sound of things quite successfully) stand up, weapons and grappling! That's a proper MA curriculum!
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Beth

        Congratulations to you and your school. Sounds like it was a great experience.

        Will
      • 7 more comments
      • 1
      Japanese Revival of the Bayonet Martial Arts, Jukendo
      This article looks at how Japan is trying to revive Jukendo, a martial arts focused on bayonet fighting. Japan has recently revised its school rules and states that Jukendo has been "stipulated in the revised junior high school curriculum guidelines for the first time as one of nine martial arts schools can choose to teach students".

      http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2017/04/24/reference/prewar-bayonetting-martial-art-makes-return-schools/#.WP3OcPnyuUk

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        Christopher Adamchek this sounds really cool
        • 1
        Andy This to me is an excellent example of what the traditional martial arts are all about (preserving and continuing what most would consider outdated and no longer relevant military techniques and applications)!
        • 1
        Al W Interesting Article
      • 1 more comment
      • 2
      CPR, AED & First Aid Training for the Dojo (or Home)
      For anyone who is considering learning CPR, AED and/or First Aid for their Dojo or for helping their loved ones at home, you should explore some of the Red Cross or equivalent courses.

      Here are some links to various Red Cross websites:

      American Red Cross - http://www.redcross.org/take-a-class/cpr
      British Red Cross - http://www.redcross.org.uk/What-we-do/First-aid/First-aid-training
      Canadian Red Cross - http://www.redcross.ca/training-and-certification
      Australian Red Cross - http://www.redcross.org.au/first-aid.aspx

      For countries not on this list, please look for the Red Cross or equivalent service in your country.

      This has been a martial arts public service announcement. :)

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        Guillaume Chan Good initiative ! I would like to insist even more for people who teach martial arts. It should also be mandatory to receive education about the most common injuries and how to deal with them.
        • 1
        Andy [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki], I completely agree! It is entirely beneficial for everyone in all walks of life to be at least moderately trained in basic first aid and emergency life saving techniques! Fortunately I have been trained since childhood in such techniques mostly thanks to this! https://youtu.be/_6MAkLJ79LE
      • 2
      Bamboo Kumibo and Yamanni-Ryu Bo-Jutsu concepts
      One of our new members, [243703,Cameron Smith] , suggested that we add a page on Yamanni-Ryu Kobudo. As I began to research this weapons-based martial arts, I came across this interesting Bo video. Loved the basic staff techniques demonstrated in this video.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        Christopher Adamchek not bad, good organization
        • 1
        Andy [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki], this is good, no nonsense, practical Bojutsu technique (not a helicopter spin in sight :) I had to watch it twice (as I got sidetracked watching what the practitioners in the background were doing lol), excellent stuff!
        • 1
        Trent Zelazny Great video. Nicely shot and very good. I see it all applicable to the bo, jo, and hanbo as well. Thank you for posting this :)
      • 4 more comments
      • 2
      Kata Senshiken
      The Kata that I have been working on.

      Thoughts and opinions are welcome
        • 1
        Jody Williams Just say "Cut" at the end next time....:)
        You can edit it out.
        But looked good mate.
        • 1
        James Im not familiar with the kata but it was performed well with good crisp accurate movements. Nice job.
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Nice. I especially like the move where you are the grasping the opponent's shirt, pulling the opponent forward and then striking. Too many people skip or go through the motions on small details like this.

        Will
      • 5 more comments
      • 3
      Is it a Good Idea to Learn Martial Arts from a Video?
      I know this has been a hot topic for the modern martial arts world, and has been posted all over these boards from time to time.

      The active wiki demographics have changed a bit from the last time this question has been asked, and I thought I might ask it again:

      Is it a good idea for the average Joe to learn martial arts from videos, or do people require instructors for the constant guidance they can offer?
        • 2
        Andy Completely agree with [217372,KSP08] and [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki], as a learning aid or supplement, yes, as a source of learning no! IMHO Learning MA is a physical undertaking that requires physical interaction, personal correction, insight and tuition from someone who has attained a sufficient level of proficiency in the respective martial art, the term Sensei literally translates as 'one who has gone before' (not master lol) but I digress. There are so many random variables to such nuances which can vary from person to person such as size, body type, personality traits physical ability/flexibility and so on that a video recording can not see or compensate for, then there are the specific details of technique which can vary from big obvious mistakes down to minute details (which make all the difference) in actual effective martial arts training. Admittedly there are some Mcdojo that are probably just as ineffective as distance learning, but for genuine instruction there is absolutely no substitute for (literal) hands on instruction from a skilled and qualified instructor (especially within a class environment with other students who you can not only train with physically but also learn from their respective advancement and unavoidable mistakes along the path of becoming proficient yourself)!
        • 2
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Personally, I think trying to learn martial arts from only videos has a number of problems such as no training partner to practice the technique on, no instructor to watch your technique & point out any flaws, etc.

        I find online videos are best for reinforcing what I have already learned (i.e. what was step 7 in that kata/form) or for giving me ideas of new things to learn/tryout at school

        Will
        Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        JINXEDFOXY I have a hard time following a video or book, but that is me. I need to see the person in front of me.
      • 8 more comments
      • 2
      Legs flexibility
      What are important things to consider while doing leg splits training ? And what are things to avoid in our daily activities ?
      I need ur opinions.
        • 1
        Andy Hi [241486,Roger Ramer] and welcome to the community, the most important thing to consider is to not overstretch yourself and to take stretching (and all other conditioning) gradually and ideally under professional supervision, also it is vital to warm up before even attempting vigorous stretching or in any other way putting excessive strain or tension on any muscles, tendons or ligaments (especially if you are not as young or flexible as you once were like me lol), obviously in a real situation you don't have time to warm up or stretch but years of doing so in training does make one more supple/flexible and able to perform various techniques with less chance of injury (though I do state 'less' as opposed to no injury :)
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Hi Roger

        This past community topic looks at leg splits - http://community.blackbeltwiki.com/post/5994816/stretching-splits

        It has some good advice on how to improve your splits and links to wiki pages focused on stretches for splits.

        Will
        • 1
        Superamazingbadgerman Flexibility is one of the hardest types of conditioning to nail down. That's because it's a combination between the maximum extension of your muscle, the length of your tendons, and how well you keep those pesky antagonist muscles out of the way for the motion (which is usually the part everyone overlooks and walks all over me for because I've found it to be the most important element to train and someone told them flexibility is about pulling your muscles out and making them as long as possible and then ignoring how they behave for everything else in your life...).

        So basically for maximum effect, you should relax into it (letting your tension flow away like you're meditating), feel a gentle pull, and don't force the stretch. I THINK that's what I'm saying...

        Anyway, to answer your question, splits put a very high load on your tendons. This is fine if you do them with good form, but you never EVER want to crack your hip joint or knee joint doing the splits (trust me. I did it a few times, and it sucks).

        Cracking your joints occurs when a tendon (or more than one tendon) is not aligned in its proper position. With enough force, it either restricts your range of motion and threatens to cause you pain, or returns to its natural position with a snap.

        If you load up that tendon with as much energy as the splits gives it, it will snap back with a quite significant amount of force and, more likely than not, hurt you.

        I'd say if you have bad hips or you're not good at feeling when your limits are or when you may need to adjust your leg/hip, the splits are not a very good exercise for you.

        As long as you're feeling a stretch in your muscles as opposed to a pull in your tendons (and you stop when you either start to feel that pull or the stretch is too much for you), you should be fine.
      • 1 more comment
      • 1
      The Future Of Martial Arts?
      Here is an article that shows how some are trying to combine traditional MA training with 21'st century technology. https://www.rt.com/document/58f4f7f1c361885b408b463d/amp
      Do you think this is a good thing or a bad thing (or irrelevant either way)?
        • 1
        Christopher Adamchek im excited for UWM to come out soon, definitely bringing martial arts into the future
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Of course, Star Trek's holodeck is the ultimate combination of martial arts & technology :) - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6e9vg4c9B4
        • 1
        Andy [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki] and [212770,Al W], I agree, even if this technology worked as advertised there are still some very serious fundamental flaws regarding actual striking development. For a start just measuring force is of very little consequence without considering the actual impact implications of a 'perceived' strike without taking into consideration the effect that such force would have on the knuckles (or other striking area) and this can only really be developed or measured accurately by striking actual physical objects (and by diligently conditioning the various parts of the body used to deliver strikes to a level where they will not be damaged by high powered impact), also, in both weapon and unarmed techniques there is the matter of Kime (focus/concentration of force applied to the target area), in advanced martial arts techniques such as Tamashiwari/Tamashigiri (breaking or cutting) the exact point of focus is actually a point 'beyond' the initial target area (the full force of the technique is to go through rather than stop at the intended target) and this can only be understood and achieved by actual physical practice (and tuition).
      • 5 more comments
      • 3
      Design the Perfect Karate Kata or Taekwondo Form
      If you were a wise old master or sensei, how would you design the perfect NEW kata or form for low level black belts? What would you put in this perfect kata or form?

      Would it consist of paired kata or solo kata? Would it be fast or slow? Would it be one minute or twenty minutes long? Would consist of multiple advanced moves or just a variety of basic techniques? Hundreds of steps or only 20?

      This question is NOT asking what is the best existing kata or form. Rather it is asking you to design a new form or kata. Create your own ultimate kata or form!!

      Please explain why you added certain elements to your perfect kata/form and why your kata/form would be useful for low level black belts.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 3
        Andy [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki], here's one I have been working on,
        From Shizentai (or natural stance), put your left leg in, left leg out, in out in out then shake it all about, do the hokey Kokey and you turn around and that's what it's all about. :)
        • 2
        Chris Ashcraft To answer the question, I would take a look at contemporary fights, against both experienced and inexperienced fighters. After studying these encounters, I would look at my roster of techniques, both striking and throwing, and put them into a natural flow. When the form is done, each section of the form would represent a type of encounter, and have several options of how to deal with the attach codified into the movement. This, it would be a series of forms, not a single form to represent the fighting philosophy.
        • 1
        Trent Zelazny LOVE this post! I want to give this a bit of thought :)
      • 22 more comments
      • 1
      Escape From A Leg Grab While On The Ground
      This video looks at using a roundhouse kick in order to escape from a leg grab while on the ground.

      I have added a wiki page that looks at this Krav Maga technique and also explores how Krav Maga students are taught to get up from the ground after an attack - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/leg-grab-while-on-ground-roundhouse-kick-defense

      I hope to add more leg grab defenses to the wiki over the next few days.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
      • 2
      Choong Jang (ITF TKD)
      I've been trying to find out why the 2nd Dan form Choong Jang has 52 moves. ITF forms are named after important people, places, groups, or events in Korean history. In many ITF forms, the number of moves in the form has a significance- such as the latitude of their birthplace, their age when they did something important or when they died, etc. Kwang Gae has 39 moves because king Kwang Gae came to the throne in 391- so it could be some complicated reason. I have searched for the last five months for an explanation for Choong Jang having 52 moves and in the process I have learned a lot of stuff about him (all the forms have required information that everyone learns-- and the information for Choong Jang apparently has an incorrect date in it!)--but I have not found a reason for the number 52. I read somewhere that some forms just need a certain number to return you to your starting spot- I'm beginning to suspect that has to be the case here. My master instructor will eventually ask me for more information than the standard response everyone learns-- it is a fun little game we play, so I've been trying to find out but have had no luck. If anyone has a resource they can recommend with a meaning for 52, I would greatly appreciate it. I have plenty of historical information for him but nothing for the number 52. Thanks!
        • 1
        Al W CHOONG-JANG is the pseudonym given to General Kim Duk Ryang who lived during the Lee Dynasty, 14th century. This pattern ends with a left-hand attack to symbolize the tragedy of his death at 27 in prison before he was able to reach full maturity.

        http://www.northwesttkd.co.uk/student-resources/the-meaning-of-patterns/
        • 1
        Andy Hi [217372,KSP08], I'm sure you have already considered this and I am just stating the obvious (also I know little about the history behind TKD but am learning more thanks to the book recommend by [183970,David Ianetta] :) but the first significance that springs to mind with the number 52 is weeks in a year?
      • 5 more comments
      • 2
      Martial Arts: The Real Story Parts 1+2
      Excellent MA Documentary
        • 1
        Andy Ok here are parts 1 and 2 (hopefully with better sound quality though again I haven't checked yet lol) https://youtu.be/mxMxoE4uoMo https://youtu.be/JmAWeX6eAbA
        • 1
        Andy Just watched this myself and apologise for the crappy sound (though it isn't my fault lol), to be honest I didn't watch it before posting and it is a while since I last saw it (before rewatching tonight), I'll try to find a better version as (despite some stuff I don't personally agree with) there are some excellent insights (especially in part 2).
        • 1
        ChuckD I know what i'll be watching tonight.
      • 1 more comment
      • 1
      Hanbo Techniques
      Since we have discussed cane self-defense techniques, I thought you might like to watch some Hanbo techniques.

      Wiki's section on the Hanbo (Japanese short staff - roughly 3 feet in length) - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/hanbo

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        Trent Zelazny I really enjoy Sensei Roemke. He has wonderful videos for beginners and advanced. He also has a couple nice video basics on the Kubotan. If nothing else, I feel he's worth watching for the pure joy of the hanbo.
        • 1
        Andy [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki], here is a video of Sensei Mike Finn's Seiti Tanjo (which is as far as I have ever been able to tell is a simplified version of some Hanbo Jutsu techniques),
        https://youtu.be/8tekRCF64T8
      • 3
      Types of Canes for Personal Defense
      This 9 minute video looks at some canes that can be used for self-defense purposes. It also looks at a cane designed with self-defense in mind (i.e. it has a semi-serrated edge).

      What type of cane does your martial arts school train with? A common everyday type cane? Or a specially designed cane?

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        Andy [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki], to answer your question, I have a collection of various sticks and canes that I train with, ranging from traditional Bamboo staffs and canes (in various lengths and thickness), 'root ball' sticks (such as the traditional Irish Shelelaigh), traditional oak Jo, Bo and Hanbo and hook handled canes (some of which where the hook is not too curved are also a good substitute for some Kama
        techniques).
        • 1
        Andy [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki], great instructional video! One very important aspect though that wasn't mentioned is the composition of the hooked or handled cane. Many canes/walking sticks are two piece (as opposed to being formed from a single piece of wood) and are composed of a straight shaft with a separate hook or decorative handle glued on. Obviously the single piece sticks/canes are much more strongly built and are therefore far more suited to hooked cane defence techniques (you don't want to try hooking or trapping an aggressor with a hook or handle that is glued on as it is likely to come off), that being said if you train in such techniques any type of hooked cane can be used at a pinch but as this video was focused on types of canes specifically for defence I thought this was worth mentioning.
      • 1 more comment
      • 1
      Poomsae
      Can anyone share me the steps of poomsae 1-17
        • 1
        David Ianetta I find these videos very helpful. They are originally from the Kukkiwon.

        https://www.youtube.com/user/CFDTAEKWONDO/videos
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Which Taekwondo form are you looking for?

        Here are the wiki sections focused on the forms & patterns of the two main branches of Taekwondo.

        WTF Taekwondo Forms - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/wtf-taekwondo-forms
        ITF Taekwondo Patterns - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/itf-taekwondo-patterns
      • 2
      Even Master Ken is getting in on the United controversy
      Master Ken's defense techniques versus aggressive airline employees who are looking to bump passengers from the seats.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        Beth Loomer I always love Master Ken videos
        • 1
        Andy [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki], as always excellent advice from Master Ken, I completely agree with his advice about choosing a quality airline, like this one for example :) https://youtu.be/WQcjanPGqAA
      • 1
      Rabbit Punch (1955) with original recreated titles and recreated special ending ...
      A Special Treat For Happy Easter Bunny Day/Weekend Or Whatever :)
      • 3
      Training for Tournaments
      How does everyone change their training in the weeks leading up to a tournament?

      Since about 50%of our school goes to tournaments the whole school trains harder for the month month and a half before tournaments. A few of us have even started rolling with the Judo instructor after our normal TKD class because there is karate grappling at the tournament we are getting ready for. A few others and myself train an hour or so before class, then do our normal class, and have started rolling with the Judo instructor for an hour and half or so after class most days of the week. Regular class we do 5 nights a week and some Saturdays.
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        Will - Black Belt Wiki This site recommends tapering down the workout volume about 4-6 weeks in advance of a tournament - https://breakingmuscle.com/learn/the-5-rules-of-peaking-before-a-tournament-plus-a-6-week-plan

        Here is another pre-fight training schedule from a BJJ school which mainly reduces the "non-martial arts training" (i.e. strength sessions) before a fight - http://www.bjjscandinavia.com/2015/08/18/a-6-weeks-programme-to-prepare-for-competition-training-conditioning-dieting-and-mindset/

        Will
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        Will - Black Belt Wiki [220307,Beth Loomer]

        Grappling? I thought you were a Taekwondo gal. You must be a multi-faceted Taekwondo gal!!! :)

        How is the grappling section run in this multi-style tournament? Submission rules?

        Will
        Black Belt Wiki
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        James For me it depends on the type of tournament. For the semi contact stuff I dont really do anything additional other than focus on the techniques that are legal in that format in class in the preceding weeks. For the knockdown competitions I will tend to do extra specific knockdown training, extra cardio and body weight strength exercise away from the dojo and shed a couple of excess kilos on the way.
      • 16 more comments
      • 2
      Cane Masters - Circle of Masters 10-16-2015
      This video is a 39 minute seminar from Cane Masters (which is a group that teaches students how to use a cane for self-defense).

      It also a shout out to one of newest members, [243146,MSGDOC] :)

      Hopefully, he can help us to build out the cane section on the wiki or provide us with some cane info, tips and/or stories on the community.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
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      Balance training for martial artists
      I have just added another great balance exercise to the wiki's balance training section - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/martial-arts-balance-exercises

      This exercise involves standing on one leg and catching a ball without putting your foot down - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/ball-toss-balance-training

      If you know any more balance exercises not listed on the wiki, please let me know.

      Also do you think that martial artists should perform additional balance training or does regular martial arts training provide enough balance work on its own?

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
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        Andy https://youtu.be/QbvbIN0nN7A
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        Richie I find I never needed "balance training." The practice of kicks, kata, and "always training" has given me great balance. I use my limited training time else wear. The same goes for speed.
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        Christopher Adamchek Bo sparring on a balance beam is a good drill ;)
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      • 2
      Axe kick question
      Since my training in Goju Ryu I have been told to start my axe kick inside to outside. Since a teenager I have done both and both have been effective for me. Even though I find "my" outside to inside a lot more powerful. I see Kyokushin kumite were an axe kick from the outside to the temple knocks a guy out.

      I still practice both and will teach both when I have my own dojo; I don't believe in limiting the body. I don't know if this is a Goju Ryu thing or not. One of my few dings on my BB test was for the axe kick demo, lol.

      TKD people please chime in!
        • 1
        Christopher Adamchek So no one else practices straight axe kicks?
        • 1
        Richie Thanks all, always glad when my thoughts align with other practitioners by not limiting myself.
        • 1
        Hermit In TKD we do teach both. I find that the in to out axe kick generates a better power where the out to in feels alot more awkward to me. But it is personal preference there, some seem to have an easier time doing out to in. For myself my hip line up much better on the in to out which allows me to bring more force to the downward part of the kick. It also really depends on your target and what opening they are giving as well. Also in TDK we have a few different kicks, there is the inside to out crescent and the out to in cresent. This would probably be what you see when a guy makes contact to the side of the head. the axe kick is half a cresent that is then changed direction at the top and brought downward to land a blow usually to shoulder or body.
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      Speed vs Body weight
      Hey everyone,

      My Krav Maga black belt exam was this last week-end. Unfortunately I failed. One of the main reason was that, during the whole exam, the judges were unsatisfied with "a lack of bodyweight in my moves". But the thing is that they also ask us to perform the techniques with great speed.

      But the faster you perform your techniques, the more difficult it is to put complete bodyweight in all your moves because you don't have the time to. Thus, when I perform the techniques fast I cannot engage my body completely in all my moves but only partly. To meet their requirements I would have to slow down.

      I wanted to know your point of view on that matter. What's more important to you : complete body weight or speed with less bodyweight ? How do you handle this problem in your different martial arts ?

      Thanks !
        • 2
        Manie Interesting! I like the comments - all useful.
        To add something else: I find that especially junior grades (male, teens, cocky) tend to overemphasize speed, maybe under the influence of Hollywood. They then lose form (correct technique) and power/penetration. For example, a punch may be fast, but the fist wavers like a paintbrush.That is evidence that there is no kime, or put differently, that the form is poor. They must be reminded over and over again that you first get the form right and practise that continuously. Speed comes with many repetitions. I personally hate those endless repetitions, but there is no short cut. If there is any, tell me please!
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        Mitt Radates This is a key issue. Engaging the body (hips, shoulders, core, legs) during striking is not natural for some students. For those students, I have them practice the body engagement movements without actually striking. When the body engagement is smooth and natural, we add striking (straight punches, hook punches, knee strikes and round kicks). This has the added benefit that many of those movements are also part of punch defense techniques. But training on them first allows students to focus on them without the "distraction" of striking mechanics.
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        Chad People often think that in order to be fast they need to give up body mechanics. The power lost when trying to throw techniques fast is far greater than the speed lost when using proper technique and body mechanics.
        There is also a difference between what I call fast and frantic most people are frantic when they think they are being fast. Krav Maga schools seem to vary in the way a person counter attacks after a defence, from what I've seen most tend to be more frantic than fast. Fast is smooth and smooth is invisible, George Foreman during his comeback was one of the slowest boxers in the heavy weight division yet was among the most accurate punchers in boxing. That was because he was so smooth that nobody saw his body move until his punch landed and stole their soul.
      • 14 more comments




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