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  • New Posts

      • 2
      Plyometric Leg Exercises for Martial Arts Kicking Speed & Power
      Since a number of our members were discussing exercises to improve their kicking power and speed, I thought that I would post a video of plyometric leg exercises. Professional athletes use plyometrics in order to develop more "explosive" power and faster starts.

      Here is the wiki's page on plyometrics - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/plyometrics

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
      • 2
      If you started a Martial Art later in life, why?
      I'm very curious to see the different reasons why people are drawn to a Martial art. So if you got into a Martial art, can you post How old you were when you started, what Style MA you took and what caused you to start?
        • 2
        Keith Alan Rowley It was something I could do with my son and I am more into it than him at this time. I decided that I should not force him to come as his journey is different.
        • 2
        Bill After getting busted in Taekwondo I gave it up at 70. Our VA started a Karate class with no contact. The exercise and learning forms are good for the mind and body. Besides, it's better than spending my time watching TV. Bill
        • 1
        Kathryn Carson Started taekwondo as a way to get out of the house with my two-year-old, at a mommy-and-me class.

        Got passionate about it when I realized it was putting to bed a lifetime of anxiety and fear, all stemming from being an independent woman in an often unfriendly world. (Being a college kid when a serial killer hit my boyfriend's school didn't exactly help me see the world in a better light, either. Twenty years on, and those memories still haunt me.)

        Continuing in taekwondo now, despite my physical limitations, because it's one of the few things keeping me sane while doing what I've come to call the "cancer dance."

        For me, taekwondo has been all about survivorship.
      • 15 more comments
      • 3
      Steven Seagal Jokes
      We have a thread for Chuck Norris Facts, and everyone on here "Loves" Seagal

      So let's have one for Steven Seagal jokes, here's your starter for ten

      Steven Seagal is being sued for harassment. The judge ruled however if you watch a Steven Seagal marathon willingly it is not harassment
        • 2
        Bill Emmes Before someone explained it to him, President Trump thought "Affirmative Action" was a Steven Segal movie.
        • 1
        Al W Good to see Steven Seagal helping fight online piracy by releasing movies no one wants to download
      • 1
      How to Attract Female and Older Adult Martial Arts Students?
      One of our new members, [253491,Lana McGee Straub] , asked the following question:

      "I am a 1st Dan Kukkiwon black belt in taekwondo and currently trying to help my Grandmaster recruit more women and older (40 plus) new white belts. Any suggestions on how we can grow our dojang in that direction?"

      Anyone have any great ideas for Lana?

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 3
        Kim Agree, Will.

        We don't train with kids in same class, but we have a "parent" class that trains in the back room at same time as kids' class (other adults are welcome to train then as well). I think all of our older adult students came from that route. You may want to have a "bring-your-parent-to-class" day and have stations with instructors teaching different skills and rotate parent-child team groups through many activities. Also, my instructor has taught some "women's (and teen girls) self defense" courses. We also tried a women's only cardio kick boxing class to try and get new members, but so far no one has crossed over from that pay-by-the-class/no uniform style course to our traditional program. Many women find that they like hitting things.
        • 0 3 votes
        • Reply
        • 1
        Kathryn Carson Community. On the surface, the MMOMAs class (Mother's Morning of Martial Arts) at our dojang is "just" a mommy class. But it's women from all walks of life--workers and SAHMs, moms of special needs kids, younger professional women, you name it--all strengthening themselves and each other. The dojang's motto is, "Discipline the mind, the body will follow." But the MMOMAs motto is, "What gets said in MMOMAs, stays in MMOMAs." We joke that it's therapy with some kicking thrown in. And boy howdy, do we take our frustrations out on the bag and on BOB. The MMOMAs has had a changing roster of women over the last 30 years, but it's always been the heart and soul of Gentle East.
        • 1
        Bill Emmes As a over +40, One of the things I see that can be difficult for older men and women is scheduling. Most people would prefer to attend classes during the evening as their day time schedules re pretty busy. Saturday morning is another good time to do this.

        Also, as people get older, they fear the ability to actually perform in any MA. People tend to be more conscious of their abilities and hold more fear of what they can do and can't do. I have seen classes dedicated to working with older students just like you see the kids classes. It will take patience and a slower pace to build confidence. I have seen older folks walk into a general class and feel completely intimidated by what they see and think they could not keep up and feel embarrassed.

        Also, I think that classes can be tailored around specific self defense training designed to make older students feel more comfortable in attending. I have seen classes that teach cane techniques, forms training, etc. to older students and the draw is there for them to attend and not feel so incapable. Then after a short time in practice, they acclimate into the main classes to learn more of what the style offers.

        Classes can be any type of self defense techniques hat can make an older person feel more comfortable and not as compelling to the as competing with a flaming fast 20 year old flexible rubber band. Younger people tend to do things fast and can normally retain and learn forms quickly. Older folks are more inclined to go slower and think thru everything. Stress relief, balance, fitness/endurance and basic self defense are most appealing to the older folks. Then once confidence sets in, they typically become hooked and become long term students of the style and practice the everyday style in entirety.
      • 15 more comments
      • 2
      I'm being summoned to help teach...
      Hi everyone... After a long hiatus of not practicing on a regular basis... (Just occasional kicking punching a bag, and resistance cardio training, I was asked to come help out at my Alma Mater TKD Dojang. It has been years since I formally trained, my forms and terminology are rusty. The basics are still there, but I need to be able to brush up on Taekwondo: Terminology, forms (Taeguks) and other... Any ideas how to have a crash course on life as an active practitioner? Any and all help and ideas would be greatly appreciated!
      Thank you! Keungye!
        • 2
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Hi Ed

        Welcome to the wiki community.

        For an online refresher, I would start with the wiki.

        WTF Taekwondo forms (with videos & instructions) - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/wtf-taekwondo-forms
        Taekwondo Terminology - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/taekwondo-terminology

        I would also ask your instructor to help bring you up to speed.

        Good luck. Let us know how it goes.

        Will
        Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        Richie videos, this wiki, books, etc

        There is so much on the internet it is nuts. Dive in!

        Try creating lesson plans or do a class in your head. I find I get questions I wouldn't have normally asked. Teaching brings out so much.
        • 1
        Mister Ed Thank you, yes I have been dabbing into the form videos, will have to brush up on terminology as well. Keungye!
      • 1
      Hello! Charyut! Keungye!
      Hi I am Ed. I am in Florida US, looking forward to interacting here and continue to learn and share my experiences with the arts.
      Thank you!
      • 3
      Advice on how often to practice
      I have a quick question. I have always understood that when working out with weights you should allow a day in between working out specific muscle groups for recovery.

      However does that apply to doing endurance leg training?

      In other words I've been trying to develop my leg strength, and also get out of my cube here at work. So I go into the stair well and just hold my leg in the "cocked" position for each kick (front, side, round house, back), counting to twenty. Then I do things like sitting in the invisible chair. Is there any problem with doing these every day? Does endurance training like that still require the day of rest in between that weight training would?
        • 2
        Kim I like the chamber drills you are already doing. Something we do that is similar is a 3 or 4-point kick drill... slowly chamber, extend, hold, & retract each kick. Sometimes we also do a "figure-8" where you move the extended leg in a figure 8 pattern.
        • 2
        Bill Emmes Any muscle group training should follow an alternate training schedule. The muscle group you train one day will need another day at least to recuperate and adjust to the stress you put on it.

        I am also in danger of living in a cube for my work and as such, like to do leg exercises to keep my legs strong for my practice. As such, I like to work a different muscle group of the legs alternately. also, by mixing it up and resting in between, I can get a greater impact and endurance as a routine everyday set of the same exercises can easily plateau and stop your development.
        • 2
        Will - Black Belt Wiki David

        That is an interesting question.

        For strength training, experts often advise that people have 1-2 days of rest for each muscle group (thus they alternate muscle groups such as upper and lower body groups in order to workout most of the days in the week). However, for competitive runners, they generally seem to run most days of the week. They seem to "rest" only by running less mileage some days.

        I fall in the camp of resting alternate days to let your muscles heal & recuperate. It also helps to offset any training boredom by cross training on alternate days so people don't burn out with non-stop focus on one area.

        Not sure if that answers your question. Any thoughts people on whether endurance training (with light weights & lots of reps) needs less rest & recuperation than strength training (with heavy weight & fewer reps)? Or do both need the same amount of time to recover?

        Will
      • 18 more comments
      • 3
      Balancing martial arts training and weight training
      For give my ignorance but how do some of you guys schedule your MA and weight training so that you get the most out of both? Also I have a physical labor job.
        • 1
        Dave Magliano Hi Seth. Resistance training and rest periods all come down to the load you are placing on muscle tissue. The higher the load, the more tearing you get. Muscle tearing creates inflammation (bleeding), which causes scarring. As you repeat this process, you must use heavier loads because the body adapts to whatever stress is placed upon it.

        The real question is, why are you weight training? Strength? Mass? Power? Most people train with weights for aesthetics rather than function. So if you're training for function, what is your objective?

        After training with weights for over 20 years, hitting the gym three days a week, I finally realized I could be spending that time perfecting my technique. The best way to do that is body weight training because it spreads out the load instead of placing it all on one muscle group like weight training does. You are forcing muscle groups to work together without over-stressing your tissue and joints. So you can train every day without worrying about over doing it.

        Now of course, this depends on your joints. There are some things I can't do because of shoulder instability, e.g. dips. And if one of your objectives is to build mass, well then you'll have to lift weights but you undoubtedly sacrifice joint motion in most cases which is not good for any martial arts. My two cents.
        • 1
        Alex Alexandrov Do bodyweight exercises instead of weight exercises. It can help you if you find it too complicated doing weight training and martial arts training together.
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Hi Seth

        I try to alternate days. For example, martial arts training might be on Mon, Wed, Fri & Sunday. And my strength & conditioning days are on Tues, Thurs & Sat. Of course, life usually interferes with that schedule. :)

        Nevertheless, I try to space things out in order to let my body recover from my training. As a 50 something, I need the recovery time! Many fitness & health sites also recommend alternating days for upper body and lower body strength training.

        According to WebMD, "While that tearing process is vital for the muscle building activity to begin, it's really the respite in the next 48 to 72 hours that leads to muscle strength...one of the key reasons some people don’t see results after 8 to 10 weeks of weight training is because they are simply not giving their bodies adequate time to recover" - http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/features/6-tips-for-successful-weight-lifting-workouts

        Will
      • 1
      Passing of Master Jack Hwang
      Sadly, I want to report the passing of Master Jack (Saejin) Hwang, 9th degree Black Belt, Taekwondo, WTF. He was my instructor many yrs ago in the 1970s! He was tough, but kind and fair!! I had the privilege of attending his memorial service in Oklahoma City!! I will always remember him! I understand he once instructed Bruce Lee!
      • 6
      The Real Power Of What We Do
      I assume most of us using this platform have developed some type of martial arts background. We all have our own reasons for beginning this journey but I believe the majority would have to admit we started training to learn how to fight. If you stay in the game long enough, your ego gives way to a deeper purpose for the many hours (and injuries) accumulated from continuing along your chosen path. And though we may question ourselves at times (at least I do) as to why we keep training, if we're lucky we get a reminder of how much of an impact we have on others.

      That happened to me yesterday.

      After class, one of my students pulled me aside and admitted that when he started training with us over two and half years ago, he had a serious drug problem. Like a lot of people who come to our small dojo, he underestimated the physicality of what we do (aikibudo). He was uncoordinated, couldn't perform the simplest ukemi or footwork. He threw up a lot (we have a puke bucket just for that.) He was often frustrated and dejected after class, noting that he could not understand why this so difficult because other physical pursuits were typically easy for him. While I knew he initially had a poor diet, I had no idea he had dependency issues.

      But he kept coming. Week after week, he kept coming. Slowly but surely, his technique improved as did his demeanor and physical appearance. He trained despite minor injuries. He learned how to deal with the elements - our dojo is not heated or air conditioned. He learned how to handle discomfort. Most importantly, he learned and continues to learn how to mitigate his ego.

      We talk a lot about the impact good budo training has on the ego. By the way, the origin of the word "budo" may be Japanese but the meaning goes across the board. Anyway, I think most of us can agree that a poorly developed ego leads to all kinds of life issues. Drug and alcohol abuse, relationship problems, money problems...war. It all has to do with ego.

      In developed countries like ours, the majority of the population seeks comfort in various ways and thus feed their egos. Few people seek the discomfort of serious training in any form. Perhaps this is what the founders of our respective arts had in mind when they brought their knowledge to the world.

      Most of us can knock people down in some way, shape or form. We spend years toughening our bodies, perfecting our technique. Sooner or later the physical aspect of training gives way to a deeper purpose. We may train ourselves and others in some form of combat, but physical skill has limits. The potential impact we have on others is limitless.
        • 1
        Karin Fourie Thank you for a really good article Dave. Also Bill for your insightful comments. I am currently at that place where I'm trying to figure out why I keep on going to the dojo. I have a very full schedule juggling work and studying (studying again when you're in your fifties is not fun at all). Some evenings I'm so tired that I really can't face the 25 mile drive to the dojo and thus I haven't been there for the past month. It feels like part of me is missing. I have suddenly realised that I am focusing on my thoughts and inner self and am on a journey of self-discovery, all triggered by my guilty feelings of not training.

        I suspect when I'm done, I would have moved past my original reasons to take up karate again after thirty years, which was to obtain my black belt. I have done so last year and have since been looking for motivation to keep on training. I hope to find my motivation in becoming a better person with less issues than I currently think I have
        • 1
        Bill Emmes Hi Dave,

        This is a really a good article and a serious point that you have written. The timeline you describe is spot on. We all start with the idea of learning how to fight and protect ourselves. During the course of our training we are taught so many things aside from the physical and eventually, we find ourselves learning more about ourselves and a deeper inner awakening takes place.

        Early in our training we get frustrated with the inability to perform as good as others or what we expect from ourselves. But our instructors teach us that time and patience, along with continued practice, will allow us to eventually do these techniques equally well and execute them just fine. During our continued training, we are taught that our efforts to do well and try hard on everything we do and not to cherry pick the things we want to do well on is key to development in our training. This becomes the cornerstone of our discipline as we tend to carry this practice/philosophy into our everyday life.

        In this timeline, confidence begins to grow as patience and attention to details continue to permeate in everything we do. We find ourselves more accepting to the facts of frustration and learn how to deal with it and adjust our approach to practice, appreciating the lack of understanding by working harder to better understand and overcome these difficulties. We learn our own short comings and find ways to overcome them and work around them. This strength is an absolute result of the good Budo training and tends to find its way outside the Dojo into our everyday lives.

        What is not so easily seen is the transformation it can have on students over the years they are practicing. Normally, in conversation, you find out that some students have had a particularly hard time juggling their personal life and practice in the martial arts. The reasons can scale well beyond our comprehension and observation during class time as we strive to teach and mold solid martial arts "practices" at every class.
        Yet, at some point, you see either yourself or each instructor working with the class or one-on-one with a student spending more time instilling confidence along with all the philosophical reasoning of the art/techniques and not really the brutal aspects of fighting. In other words, the passing on of the inner awakening is infused with the routine class material, unseen or unaware.

        I honestly think the impact that this training has, certainly does go well beyond the physical as I see not only in myself, but in other students. The level of respect that is shown towards each other coupled with the eagerness to help train and make the next student better than you, demonstrates the impact our training has had on others who have grown past their own egos and personal difficulties. Plus, you may see this in the positive growth a student has achieved in their everyday life. It could be any milestone of achievement they attain to improve themselves by applying what they practice/learn in the Dojo.

        Most people look at this as the discipline martial arts has on people and that the hard core physical training, similar to a boot camp style does to mold people into shape and be good martial artists. What is not so apparent in the true understanding of what a complete martial artist is and can be? Techniques are endless. The ability to be a tough fighter is not the core competency of our training unless you are looking to be an open competitive fighter. Even then, a weak ego has no place in this training as it is the first link to defeat.

        No…the real power of what we do is far beyond that. To me, this is the reason why some students will remain in the arts for a lifetime as it has become more than a practice to them; it is their lifestyle, their belief, their religion. It becomes the core competency of everything they do inside and outside the dojo. Our ego is developed to a higher level of understanding and not one of instant gratification or toughness. It has become infused with deeper understandings, appreciation, trust, and confidence, respect loyalty to ourselves and others…and so much more!

        Great Article! Thank you for sharing.

        Bill
        • 1
        ChuckD That reminds me of a saying I once heard "It is easier to have the tallest building in town if you tear down all the other buildings" Sometimes we need a reminder that helping others ultimately helps us all.
      • 2 more comments
      • 2
      Floyd Mayweather shows how to throw a "Power Punch"
      In the video, the famous boxer Floyd Mayweather shows a reporter how to improve his punching power. It is interesting to see how much the reporter's punching power improves after just a few simple tips from Mayweather.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
      • 3
      Certifications for instructing senior citizens in martial arts?
      Greetings to all my martial arts brothers and sisters. I am looking for a school or organization that offers seminars with certification to instruct senior citizens in the martial arts. I have been active in martial arts for 37 years, and have been instructing for 32 years. I would love to offer an opportunity for senior citizens in my community to get involved in something that can add to their quality of life like it has for all of us in the martial arts community. Having said that I also wish to approach it in the most professional and safe manor. I have the utmost confidence in my own teachings skills, but also understand that there must be proven approaches that would insure that my program is the best possible. Thank you in advance for any assistance you might provide. Master Simle
        • 1
        Brian Milligan Where is you Dojang Master Gordon Smiley. I cant find any ref. to you google. or F/B.
        • 1
        Brian Milligan The ITF Over 50 Harmony Development Program. Has training for instructors under the leadership of ITF President Gaston Casero. Contact him for further Info. 4 conferences have been held so far and they are well attended. Gaston also has a video on U TUBE describing the philosophy behind the Program well worth a watch. There is a class upcomming in Spain Feb 9th 2018. Run By the President and Maximilion Montel. I am 78 and started Taekwondo last year ,now have my Yellow belt and take my green strip Oct.in benalmadina Spain. under my Sabum Maximilion Montel. My Sabum here in Scotland is Grand Master Sutherland GMSA livingston.
        • 0 1 vote
        • Reply
        • 1
        David Petrie Having your experience, I am certain that you could develop a curriculum that would be suitable for this demographic. My first counsel is to keep it simple. I would recommend a book called "Streetwise" by Peter Consterdine (also available in video). It examines real life situations which would be beneficial to the development of your course...
        I would be very interested in your progress.
        Godspeed with your project. I am certain that you will be successful!
      • 15 more comments
      • 1
      Early Chuck Norris
      Watch Chuck Norris when he was young - great speed and agility.

      And for more about Chuck Norris (including Chuck Norris "facts") - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/chuck-norris

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        Alex Alexandrov Yeah he is awesome. Especially when he was younger he was phenomenal fighter.
      • 2
      New Members - All topics are still open for comments
      Everyone

      All of the community's topics are open for your comments & replies. Even the most popular & highest rated topics (i.e. what questions to ask before joining a martial arts school, what movie inspired your training, should martial arts instructors know CPR, etc.) are open for new answers & responses.

      Don't be a lurker. :) Post something that will help (or entertain) beginners. Every comment & reply helps people to become better martial artists and/or to learn more about a style or technique.

      To respond to the latest topics, visit our "New" section - http://community.blackbeltwiki.com/new

      To respond to the most popular & highest rated topics, visit our "Top Rated" section - http://community.blackbeltwiki.com/top

      FYI - To respond or post a new topic, you need to be a community member. If you want to become a member, here is the sign-up page - http://community.blackbeltwiki.com/sign-up

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        Al W If anyone has any new MA based jokes that would be great
      • 2
      Private vs. Commercial Dojo
      Friends, I would appreciate your feedback. For the past 25 years, I have never had a commercial dojo. While in the military I taught on Air Force bases for a nominal fee for building rental. After I retired, I opened a small dojo in my home and class fees have always been donation.

      I've done it this way for several reasons, mainly because I wanted to teach folks who would not have the money for a commercial dojo and because I never wanted to water down my classes. The unique thing about having a dojo on your own property and not charging people is that you don't "owe" anybody a lesson. Furthermore, I have always been leery about depending on students to keep the doors open.

      Of course, the downside is that a lot of people who may want to come and train don't even know we exist despite our presence on the internet (youtube, facebook, website, Instagram).

      I am considering taking the initial steps to open a commercial school, to grow my dojo in ways I haven't considered before, e.g. teaching kids. We all know that martial arts training improves the society around us and positively impacts people's lives. I am very aware of the financial and time commitments of such an endeavor.

      I would like to hear from you about your experiences. Do you train in a private or commercial school? Do any of you do this for a living or supplement your income? If you teach in a commercial school, do you have to make things easier than you would like in order to keep your dojo full? I would appreciate any feedback you have. Thanks.
        • 1
        Richie He is not my sensei, but I hold his words with much weight. When talking about going full-time commercial he said, "There is no money is real karate training. They do not care that you have a family or bills to pay. You will be the first thing they cut from the budget."

        We went onto say there are many good schools that have made it and pursue it if it is your dream. If you look online many schools sell DVD's, do camps, some run an after school day care.

        My brother and I looked into it more and the insurance is not that much. It is the time that is the killer. A good senpai is key too. Allows you to charm the parents and get them to sign up too.
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki For everyone teaching out of your home - How do you deal with the insurance issue?

        Will
        • 1
        Pasquale Albino I have been teaching from my home 23 years can't afford to have a building.
      • 16 more comments
      • 1
      Error in Today's Martial Arts Newsletter - Sorry!!!
      There was a link error on the wiki pages in this morning's email newsletter. I apologize for any inconvenience. Webmaster duties for a martial arts guy can sometimes be troublesome. :)

      Here are the correct links:

      Sagi Makiwara - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/sagi-makiwara
      Makiwara - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/makiwara
      Ude Makiwara - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/ude-makiwara
      Concussion - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/concussion
      Cauliflower Ear - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/cauliflower-ear
      Seated Straddle Splits - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/seated-straddle-splits-with-wall-assist
      Side Splits - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/side-splits
      Leg Stretching Devices - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/leg-stretching-devices

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
      • 1
      Old Fashion Women's Self-Defense
      Jujutsu techniques from the 1920s or 1930s. This black & white film focuses on techniques that could be used for women's self-defense.

      Although, I am not too sure about the leg technique used when the woman was sitting in the chair.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
      • 2
      shotokan karate
      Hello to all i live in silistra Bulgaria and need someone to refresh my memory i have forgot most katas so help is needed with this, thanks for any response regards malcolm
        • 1
        Al W Shotokan Sensei on youtube is also a good resource
        • 1
        malcolom latham Hello to all .does anyone know of a shotokan dojo in or near silistra in Bulgaria please .i am new to the country .thanks for any comments malcolm
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Malcolm

        Here is the wiki's section on Shotokan kata - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/shotokan-karate-katas

        These pages have videos and/or written instructions.

        Will
        Black Belt Wiki
      • 1
      Kata done by a 70+ year old
      For those who might think that they are too old for martial arts training, here is a kata performance done by an individual in the 70-79 year old division.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
      • 1
      Marine Martial Arts Instructors Course
      This video provides a look at the training and conditioning provided during the Marine Corps Martial Arts Instructors Course. This course helps Marines to be able teach techniques contained in the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program (MCMAP).

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
      • 1
      Putin - True Judo Master or False Judo Expert?
      Since [171807,Andy] is busy, I thought that I would post an Andy-like article to generate some discussion, controversy and/or humor.

      This Washington Post article discusses whether Putin is a fake Judo expert and only fights people who are willing to lose to him or be thrown by him - https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2017/07/18/is-vladimir-putin-a-judo-fraud/?utm_term=.83db04a2ef8b

      What do you think? True - as no one wants to embarrass Putin (because you might land in jail)? False - Putin is very good and at 64, Putin is only training & doing demos and is not fighting competition matches.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
      • 3
      new member
      I just want to say hello and give a little background about myself. I am a 70 year old Christian martial artist. I have been in and out of the martial since I was about 20. I did not earn a blackbelt until I was in my sixties. I have gotton out of shape and miss the martial arts, environment. I am slowed down due to an arttifical hip and I am overweight. I would like to relearn the Kwon Do forms up through Taebuk. I look forward to becomimg an active member of this commmunity.
        • 2
        Angelito V. Arquesa Hi everyone, I am Angelito V. Arquesa a Secondary School Teacher from Philippines. I earned a black belt since my high school days and now I just want to continue with this martial arts a Taekwondo. I love Taekwondo that is the reason behind why I am pursuing this kind of martial arts by teaching students to make them globally competitive.
        • 2
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Robert

        Welcome to the wiki community. Have you rejoined a martial arts school yet?

        In case you haven't visited it yet, here is the wiki's section on Taekwondo forms - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/taekwondo-forms-patterns

        It has videos and/or written instructions for many of these forms.

        Will
        Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        dtaylorbrazil Welcome, Mr. Bennett! Injuries can slow us down, so be careful to make proper adjustments! Please keep us updated on your progress. You are an inspiration!
      • 7 more comments
      • 1
      Krav Maga
      Hi all just started Krav I'm 52 so it's interesting trying to get my cardio up
        • 1
        Bill Emmes Hi Brent!

        I have always been interested in Krav Maga. I spent many years in Ju-Jitsu and now in Chinese arts (Hung Gar). The art of suppression and grappling has always been a favorite of mine. As I move forward in the current style of Hung Gar, I see just how many arts have some sort of Chin Na (seizing and controlling) in them and this is something I really like.

        I think that Krav Maga is a powerful method of quickly subduing an aggressor(s) armed or unarmed. More and more styles are incorporating this into their practice and I think it is a good idea.
        • 1
        Mitt Radates After nominal stretching, I have my students do 15 jumping jacks, run in a 20 foot circle for 10 seconds picking knees up, then 10 seconds kicking heels up, then move foot-to-foot laterally, 4 steps left, 4 steps right, then 3 then 2 then 1,then 1-2-3-4. It doesn't sound like much, but by that time, heart rates are up nicely without it being too strenuous. For my own cardio, I also "run" on the treadmill with the motor turned off. Just 5 minutes of that will clear your head.
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Hi Brent

        Welcome to the wiki community. Have are you finding the Krav Maga training so far? Are you doing any cardio training outside of Krav Maga (i.e. running)?

        Will
        Black Belt Wiki
      • 1
      Over 50 plus - getting back into training!
      Well I got my black belt 1st dan way back in 1990 in taekwondo - been training on/off due to family and work (and education) commitments, etc. I need to get back in training and start afresh, it's going to be tough but I have to do it. My family think I am too old now!!!
        • 2
        Bob NEVER TOO OLD!
        I will be 69 years old in two months. I have been training for 14 years with my now 30-year-old son. We are both 3rd Dan.
        TRAIN ON...and never look back!
        • 2
        Gregory Grove I'm 54 and just got my Orange Belt. I'm a 100% disabled veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps (P.T.S.D) + Traumatic Brain Injury. I want to prove it to myself that I can make it Black Belt,so far,so good. Semper Fi !.
        • 2
        Ray I am 62 and am starting to train again at home. Never too old!
      • 18 more comments
      • 2
      Board Breaking
      We break boards in class and for tests. It actually seems to be my strong suit and I happen to enjoy it. At least, when the board breaks it is quite satisfying. I got myself a fresh new re-breakable board recently. It's not been broken in (no pun intended) so it's very stiff and hard to break. Since then I get a bruise everytime I use it and it is quite painful. I notice that I seem to be hesitant when going to break it now because of the pain factor which use to never stop me before. What are you thoughts on board breaking? Is it useful in any way? How do you get past the small fear of the pain?
      Thanks for sharing!
        • 1
        Dave Magliano I practiced board breaking (tamawashi) in my 20s and early 30s. I still have a rebreakable board I bring out in class every couple of years and have my students take turns using it. After everyone gets a chance, I ask a few simple questions:
        What does this do for you in terms of your ability to deal with an aggressive person?
        How much power does it really take to break a non-moving target?
        How much training time are you willing to use in order to effectively break boards, bats, blocks of ice, etc., without causing permanent damage to your hands and feet?
        What specifically does this prove to you?
        These are the questions I started asking myself years ago. Personally, I am much more impressed with someone who has mastered their technique in such a way that he/she barely has to use it. That's where the real power is.
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Some styles (i.e. Taekwondo & Kyokushin Karate) find breaking useful. Other styles follow the "don't hit back" philosophy and dislike breaking.

        Maybe some of our Kyokushin members like [212430,James] would like to give some "official" Kyokushin thoughts on breaking (as this Karate style differs from many other Karate styles in regards to the value of breaking).

        Will
        • 1
        Michael My 2 cents regarding board breaking is that is mostly a gimmick to make demonstrations look cool and excite potential students. Of course, it is also a test of skill and proper technique. But, as Bruce Lee stated in Enter the Dragon "boards don't hit back." Don't get me wrong. I am not against board breaking, but I see it more for promotion of the dojo or used in promotion testing.

        In my younger years, I have had my fair share of bad break attempts. I found that the hesitation I developed caused me to make more mistakes with my technique. I have never used the re-breakable boards, so I can't really comment on those. It makes sense to use different colors as part of promotion testing as it would show improvement of technique with the more difficult boards.
      • 7 more comments
      • 1
      Recognizing a Concussion: Step by Step
      This video looks at how medical professionals attempt to initially diagnose if an athlete has suffered a concussion. Concussions are a possible injury that students can suffer during martial arts training & sparring.

      Remember always to see a doctor if you have been injured!!! Do not try to self-diagnosis.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
      • 1
      Incredible fight between a Kiai master and a MMA fighter
      Karma, in a Martial Arts sense, in action
        • 1
        Dave Magliano Did anyone catch where the "master" tied his obi? I feel sorry for this guy.
      • 2
      Should martial arts instructors receive concussion training?
      Many of our members thought that martial arts instructors should learn CPR in order to protect their students. However, do you also think that they should also know how to look for signs of a possible concussion?

      FYI - A concussion can cause lasting mental problems if not treated properly. Please see a doctor if there is the slightest chance that you or your child has suffered from a concussion.

      I have added a wiki page that lists some of the possible signs of a concussion - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/concussion

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        Antony I believe they should be capable of knowing "something's not right" and knowing how to, and not being afraid to, get medical assistance. I have had a couple of major concussions along the way including losing a weeks worth of memory and I am happy that somebody thought to call an ambulance.
        • 1
        Superamazingbadgerman Instructors should absolutely have as much medical training as possible, for both skillset and certification purposes. If they can spend 6-8 years in medical school, they should. If they can learn some EMT skills along with their CPR/first aid training, that's definitely something they should do. If they can learn to spot concussion signs, they should do so.

        Even if it's not to curb liability or as a measure for the students' safety, it's just something I think they should be interested in picking up. If they're learning to hurt people, they should also learn to help people and see and make decisions from injuries they might have.
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki How does your school deal with a possible concussion?

        Will
      • 1 more comment
      • 2
      Most popular kata video with 6+ million Youtube views
      I thought that you might like to watch this extremely popular kata video from the 2010 WKF World Championships Belgrade.

      Two gold stars for the first member to identify this kata! :)

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
      • 1
      Siljun Dobup Art Form Partner Drill - Set Ji (Earth) - Set Soo 1 (Water)
      Back Row (Teacher Role) - Front Row (Student Role)

      www.perceptionswordacademy.com - www.siljundobup.com





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