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  • New Posts

      • 1
      Community will be temporarily closed
      The community will be temporarily closed for a few weeks starting this weekend as we explore ways to improve the site, increase member interaction, reduce costs, etc.

      Nevertheless, the wiki will remain open as always! - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 2
        Tracy I would love to see more posts or comments from coloured belts along with black belts. I'm sure there are many that have questions that just aren't asking them. There is so much to learn - we all need guidance and support. I sometimes feel super naive asking for help, but it's only going to benefit me - and possibly others.
      • 1
      HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training)
      I have been reading up on HIIT and would like to try it out. From what I've read, a 1:4 (work:rest) ratio is a good start for beginners. Then increase. I'd like to try this with cardio (running, elliptical, skipping, heavy bag kicking). My instructor recommended 3min work:30s rest, which I feel is unrealistic for me. I'm just getting back into exercise from a 2-month break, so I currently feel out of shape. As a beginner (although I'm not new to exercise) , should i be extra cautious so as to not injure myself, or is this relatively safe to do? Is 2 sessions/week enough to benefit? My instructor also says that when we do HIIT in class with those nasty roundhouse air kicks, to pay more attention to speed & worry less about form. My instincts raise alarm bells at this. Any opinions?
        • 1
        Tracy I should clarify something about my post. I HAVE learned from this community that I should only do speed kicking against resistance, not in the air. That just happened to be the exercise that my instructor made the comment - that when the focus is on speed, you don't need to pay that much attention to form. But I'm going to take David's advice and I will only up my speed if I feel my form is correct, even when kicking with a heavybag.
        • 1
        Rachel DS I do TABATA and HIIT with an app (free) called 8 fit. Work outs vary but typically they are either 20sec on 10 sec off repeat 8 times then rest a minute before next one or a certain amt of reps followed by 1 minute cardio. Ex include bodyweight resistance / light weights / cardio.
        • 0
        David Cochran Tracy, from our conversations I feel that you are probably in above baseline shape for you current station, even with the two month break. My first question is how sound is your cardio-vascular system? It is a given that you may not be able to perform like you once could but is physical exertion dangerous for you? The four exercises listed are lower body & torso work so you could change one to upper body for equity and maybe a little break. You could change the ratio initially (3:45s, 3:1m) to be realistic. Going 3:30s and then right back at it repeatedly is tough for anyone at any station. How many reps are you thinking about? If this is the only exercise you are doing during the week, you will not see a lot of gain out of twice/week. If you want to damage your knees and back listen to your instructor on the kicks. Listen to your instincts.
      • 5 more comments
      • 1
      My demonstration of Dan Gun
      At the over 50n Harmony course Benalmadina Spain viewed by over 100000 on Facebook

      Link - https://www.facebook.com/benito.martinezmartinez.16/videos/1541144375955169/
        • 2
        Brian Milligan Hi Tracy I am ITF. Scotland and test for my Green Belt next week here in Spain where we live in the winter.. The Taekwon Family. Wonderfull. I wish you well in your studies . and good health
        • 1
        Cole So very AWESOME!!! Great job and keep up the hard work!
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Brian

        Great job. Ready for your next belt test? :)

        Will
      • 2 more comments
      • 1
      Great Site
      I have enjoyed the information on this site!
      • 1
      Body conditioning
      Any one out there know how long it takes to see results from shaolin style body conditioning. I know they start very early. I am 27 tho and have started a daily routine of striking my shins abs forarms and other common strike points for about 2 weeks now. Any tips knowledge Is apreciated. Mainly wondering how long before the bone actually get harder thanks.
        • 1
        Bill Emmes As part of my Hung Gar Kung Fu training, I have been exposed to what is called Bone Marrow Cleansing. Bone Marrow Nei Kung. A practice to solidify both the physical strengthening of the bones, and rejuvenate the organs and glands. An advanced practice of Iron Shirt Qigong, to attain the steel body. Another part of this practice is to increase the spiritual approach to Chinese martial arts/healing.

        I have witnessed the Master of our style take serious blows to his body and not even show any indication of injury or bruising. I have seen broken knuckles as a result of hitting his arm....very difficult to get your head around. As for how long would it take to see results, I guess that depends on the manner in which you train and how you approach it.

        I incorporate specific portions of this Qigong into my practice. After 4 years of training, I have no problem taking a hit as opposed to blocking it when I was in Ju-Jitsu. I feel that the hit is adsorbed and then allows me to give it back to my attacker. I am certainly a long way from what my Master can do and take, but it certainly is a start.

        Last month, we had a 10th generation Monk of this Bone Marrow Nei Kung style, from the Shaolin Temple, give a demonstration at Harvard University. (Our Master is very closely associated with Harvard). A high ranking student gave him a kick into his groin at full impact and he just stood there. He did not move, nor did he display any signs of pain or discomfort. He simply turned and walked away with a smile on his face. This was no deliberate display to boost the ego or practice of this Monk as I heard the kick as it was delivered....and I almost fell over just witnessing it!

        Bill
        • 1
        Dave Great answer thanks helped very much.I am looking for a school to join to help me progress. il never compete at this age but i want it for the benefits physical and spiritual and hopeing i can interest my two kids
        • 1
        Rachel DS Not entirely sure on shaolin style. We mostly do uechi style conditioning in the dojo (involving striking each other)....am sure there are utube vids of it. This mostly conditions muscle rather than bone. We also do self conditioning using nanchaku (eg shins and arms....more bone) and striking pads etc. In terms of answering your questions. I have been conditioning for a few years. When I started I used to get a heap of bruises and now if I am not careful I generally give out bruises to others who tell me I have concrete legs and iron arms. The aim of conditioning has a few purposes. Some physical and others more spiritual / developmental. Not sure if that helped.
      • 1
      How not to burnout your Qi
      I heard from people who works with Qi by doing Qigong and Tai Chi that we have certain amount of Chi in our body since we were born. And it's important to spend it equally during the life period. So my question is how to protect yourself from burnout during training. Any thoughts would be appreciated.
        • 2
        Superamazingbadgerman To me, the answer seems quite simple.

        Training (especially martial arts training) should energize you.

        If you feel drained after training, you either overtrained, or there is a deficiency (poor posture, poor breathing, not enough exercise).

        If you feel energized and light, you've properly prepared the body for the day and sort of warmed up that qi power rather than exhausting it.

        I feel that's the goal we should go for as far as our personal wellness is concerned. That's how I gauge it, anyway!
        • 2
        Tracy I think my question is along the same lines? I''ve recently been reading about overtraining recently - wondering how to tell. One website says to use your pulse as a sign. It says to first write down your resting heart rate first thing when you wake up in the morning for 30 days to use as a baseline. Then continue on. If your resting heart rate exceeds 7 or more beats per minute than your average 2-3 days after a hard workout, then you're overtraining. Or if your pulse steadily increases over time. I am wanting to try this out. Has anyone tried this or something similar? I can't imagine that I'm overtraining at my level, but my instructor keeps bringing this up in our 1-on-1 conversations.
        • 1
        Bill Emmes I train in Hung Gar Kung Fu along with Tai Chi Chaun (4 years running). In doing so, Qigong is very important to what I do in both the martial arts aspects and health benefits. True, we all have Qi in our body and how we manage it, train it and use it is very important in both health and martial arts. The argument of Qi and how it can be used ranges from the ridiculous (fake) to the unexplainable. However, I can honestly argue the effects on the body for the health benefits and the calming tendencies it provides whether it is generated from the Tai Chi forms, or the individual Qigong poses.

        As for the inclusion into the martial arts sides, I can only say that my experience is still young and yet, I can say that the energy that is present in the body, what we call Qi, can be generated to a point where one feels dizzy and light headed at times. The body begins to heat up and depending on what you are doing, how you are calling on the Qi to use it, one can feel for lack of a better phrase, "over charged" and the body begins to shut down. Once this begins to happen or as soon as one feels like this is happening, it is always best to slow down or stop training and give the body a chance to distribute the Qi and actually balance out.

        I will not call this a burning out situation, but more of a condition where the practitioner has not yet learned to control the Qi effectively. Honestly, Qi does not get expended to the point where you have no more, but more like the body is not able to direct it and use it properly. At this point, one must stop and let it subside and as my instructor calls it, "let the body shut it off".

        This discussion on Qi is so fascinating and deep. I am an Electrical Engineer and since joining this school, I have been working with our Master on the aspects of measuring Qi and trying to quantify it. Unlike any other force in conventional science, this have never been done and the way to go about it, is quite various if you do a web search on it. This is a subject if I can ever gather my thoughts on, I would like to try on post it to see how many people would be interested in it. It is a difficult subject as it has been distorted over the years. No I cannot walk up walls, nor can I leap 40 feet t my opponent. But the use and generation of Qi plays a very important role in both martial arts and the healing process as well.

        I will close here by saying that it has been my experience that Qi is in everyone. as we learn to develop it and harness it properly, it is a most mysterious force that gives us some funky and explainable capabilities in how we perform techniques, heal ourselves and others. Another subject matter that I have also been privy to as I have been on the healing end of an injury with the use of Qi and a particularly interesting form of deep heat treatment. Qi is an inner energy that can be stored in our body and over time it can be transferred to others. Does it ever dissipate....in the preliminary studies I have been involved in, no. Actually, it is a regenerative energy that one can called upon and use it in so many different and extremely explainable ways.

        For me, the use and practice of Qigong, allows me to better understand the balance and building of Qi in the human body. And I continue to learn when I have reached a point where the inner energy begins to grow too strong and over powers my body, to shut it down and allow me to direct it safely without causing internal harm to myself.

        Bill
      • 1 more comment
      • 1
      Hello..
      Hi, wiki community,may name is mohamed i am very happy to join.
      • 2
      Is Shotokan Karate an Effective Fighting Style?
      For all of our Shotokan members - Do you agree with this video? Do some points make sense? Or do you totally disagree? What are your thoughts on Shotokan as a martial arts for self-defense?

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        Rhonda Rice I agree with a lot of this, but not that kata is not effective. It contains all that is needed BUT not as it is practised below shodan.
        A lot of techniques are hidden deliberately as it was adapted for school use. Neck and joint locks are there. Ultimate power is there. It was primarily a defensive art.
        The aim is not to get in a fight to start, so awareness of your own skill will stop the fear of reacting to a perceived threat and making the situation worse.

        It is a lifetime study that develops an inner peace..

        If you want pure self defence then there are other ways that learn quicker. The aim of shotokan is to not maim the attacker beyond necessity, but to have the ability to finish them if life is really threatened
        • 1
        Jeremy Willis Although I am a kung fu artist here is what I will say about "effectiveness of styles":
        I was once a police special operations officer (SWAT) and on the team we had a saying "You fight like you train...if you dont train you dont fight." Every system is as effective as you train for it to be. If you train for realistic scenarios then yes your style will be effective. If you train for kata and forms or competition that is what you will get. Bring realism into your styles and it will be a great tool set for self defense.
      • 1
      Looking for gently used equipment
      Just started training again after 25 years and working towards my black belt in Tang Soo Do. To keep costs down, I’m looking for gently used adult uniform (red trimmed) as well as sparring gear. Is there an online marketplace for this?

      Any suggestions would be appreciated.

      Tang Soo!
      • 2
      How to practice new forms on your own by watching videos
      Limited space in apartment, Watching youtube poomse... Any suggestions? Thanks! Keungye!
        • 3
        Will - Black Belt Wiki You can also break the form into segments and work on individual sections. For example, if you only have a hallway to work with, you can work on a linear part of the form before it turns left/right into another segment. Then "artificially" turn in the hallway so the next portion moves back the way you came... versus turning left/right into a wall! :)

        Will
        • 3
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Edward

        Sorry for the delay in approving this post. Friday nights & "work recuperation" slow things down for the community moderator at the end of the week. :)

        Will
        Black Belt Wiki
        • 2
        Kim Practice in the parking lot/garage. Does your apartment complex have an exercise space or tennis court? I’ve rearranged hotel room furniture to make a space for forms, too.

        If you’re talking about learning new forms online, I jumped ahead and learned one of my forms from YouTube and charts before I had been taught it in class. My instructor smiled, gave me a little bit of a hard time about learning from the internet, then fixed several things- forms have different interpretations and what you see online may not be what exactly your school does. I think my teacher was pleased that I had shown some initiative, but it can be hard to unlearn patterns if you’ve gotten steps wrong. But I use it a lot to check things after I learn the steps.
      • 9 more comments
      • 1
      Spirit Shouts & Bruce Lee
      Speaking of Spirit Shouts, Kiais and Kihaps, here is a video that reviews Bruce Lee's best shouts.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
      • 1
      Barking Mad Kiai (Spirit Shout)
      Here is a British Karate instructor's thoughts on Kiai. Of course, when he starts discussing barking dogs... all I can think of is the old quote about mad dogs & Englishmen. :)

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
      • 1
      "Fight Ball" Training - Modern Shadow Boxing?
      Here is the martial arts training question of the day - Do you think "fight ball" training is effective? Or does it teach incorrect punching mechanics?

      A fight ball appears to be a small ball on an elastic band attached to a head band. The fighter punches the ball when the elastic band causes the ball to bounce back.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        Shaun Willis Different types of tools but similar in function. Like a pool stick and a bo staff. Similar but different. Like Hiking boots and basketball shoes, similar but different. Now if you observe the fightball and speedball closely you can see each item has different action from both. They are also build different with different functions but similar concepts. The thing is each tool is specialized to a specific area of training in the same general area. Now can you use the fightball for more than jabs ? Absolutely, you can use this tool in different ways. The tool itself has a single goal, that is to be punched. So the way you want to punch it is up to you. Let me remind you... You are the one making the tool work for you, you don't work for the tool. So dont feel confined to only use it in a single way for jabs only. Keep your mind open and think outside the general restricted motions of thought. By jabing this tool you will make it react and move in a certain way. But whos to say thats all you can do ? Once again the tool works for you, you make the tool do and act how you want. Dont be restrained only making this tools use for a singular specific way and nothing else. If you want give it larger harder punches in any direction you want. Then the ball the tool will react differently oppose to jabing it only. Now your making the tool respond differently because your using it in a different variation. Now you have slightly modified your training and skill building because your using the tool in more than one singular way. One last quick example, the speed bag can also be used in more than one way. You can strike it slower or faster, harder or softer, you can even use your elbows if you choose to. Once again think outside the box of normal restricted motions of thinking. There is always more ways than one to do something. By the way you can also train your kick on both of these tools if your skilled.
        • 1
        Shaun Willis This is a good form of punching accuracy, timing and reaction. Pluse endurance and dexterity building if done for extended periods of time. Its also good cardio. You can not use this properly or functionally if you dont know how to puch or strike correctly to begin with. So when using this amazing tool in the right way it only builds your skills.
        But once again you must learn to avidly strike correctly first before using this tool and method.
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki I thought this was some sort of handmade contraption but a reflex "fight ball" is an actual product sold on Amazon - http://amzn.to/2Eb5kKF

        Will
        Black Belt Wiki
      • 1 more comment
      • 1
      Types & amount of at-home training
      I'm interested to know what others' at-home consistent training schedules are like. What type of training (strength, cardio, kicks, stretching, forms) and how many hours of each type do you do per week?
      Thank-you!
        • 1
        David Cochran Tracy, One important suggestion I missed. When kicking it is ok to kick the air with warmup and technique kicks but it is much better to use a bag or some other form of resistance when kicking at speed. It is also a different form of strength training. Let me know how it goes.
        • 1
        Brian Milligan Hi Stretching, harvard step test Cardio test, pressups and other strength exersizes. all preceded by a good warmup.
        • 1
        Shaun Willis Stretching all of the body, continued with customized burpies. Then 200 squats and 300 incline pushups from feet on top of chair, and then 200 twisting situps spread throughout the day, normally sets of 50. Then I continue into general combination striking drills. Moving forward and backwards staying in form. All of this 4 or 5 days a week.
      • 9 more comments
      • 1
      Krav Maga - "Battle Royale Over Rightful Heir"
      This NY Times article looks at how Krav Maga organizations are "competing over whose school is the most authentic and who is the real grandmaster" - https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/30/world/middleeast/israel-krav-maga.html

      When a founder of a martial arts style dies, his senior students will often battle over who is best at carrying on the legacy of his martial arts. Looks like Krav Maga is no different in this regard.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
      • 1
      Stances and punches of Goju Ryu karate
      Hello my friends:

      Is it possible for you write short descriptions on stances and punches of Goju Ryu karate.
      I
        • 1
        Richie The school of Goju Ryu will really dictate the finer details of the stance. What school do you belong to?
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Cyril

        Here is the wiki page on Goju-Ryu stances - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/goju-ryu-stances

        It has a video demonstrating the stances and pictures of the foot positions.

        Will
        Black Belt Wiki
      • 1
      Top 10 Samurai Movies
      Since I am updating the wiki's section on the best martial arts movies, I thought you might like this clip on the "top 10" samurai movies.

      Here is the wiki's section on classic martial arts movies - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/martial-arts-movies

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
      • 1
      Martial art that does not need a lot of strength?
      How can i find a martial art that does not need a lot of strength?
        • 2
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Sam

        You might want to look into martial arts that focus on redirecting & "blending" with an aggressor. An example is Aikido. According to Wikipedia, Aikido uses the "tactic of blending with an attacker's movements for the purpose of controlling their actions with minimal effort" - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aikido

        You can also visit our Aikido section to see examples of the different techniques used in Aikido - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/aikido-techniques

        Hope that helps.

        Will
        Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        Bill Emmes Within the 30 years of Ju-Jitsu training, strength was never something I focused on as everything became purely technique and as a not-so-big man, this fit my style like a suit. For every new belt, I asked some of the biggest students to assist me as I needed to know that my strength did not keep me from being successful and I would never fear the size of an attacker.

        I think one would consider endurance more important than strength. Strength itself will built as your practice continues. Just like your speed and awareness.

        At the end of the day, strength itself is not something you should consider a major factor in your Martial Arts development as this may be the very thing that your opponent recognizes and uses against you. Rely on your technique which was developed to be used without strength. It only takes between 5 and 12 lbs. to break a joint and disable an attacker. And less than that to strike a vulnerable point of the body and cause serious injury.
        • 1
        Richard Berman Hakkoryu Jujutsu has 3 tenets : no challenge, no resistance, no injury. It emphasizes from day one the abandonment of power. Using strength is an error in Hakkoryu, so might be good for your requirements.
      • 4 more comments
      • 4
      It's Supposed To Hurt
      I have visited many martial arts schools over the years and I am struck by the lengths some teachers go to provide a fun, enjoyable experience for their students. Pleasant, colorful atmosphere, crisp, starched uniforms with no blood or sweat stains, minimal contact and almost no danger of injury.  One of my favorite new martial arts fads:  padded weapons such as sticks, swords, long staffs, etc., that are nothing more than PVC pipes covered with foam...so nobody gets hurt.  Believe me, you learn a great deal from getting your fingers mashed by a wooden sword (boken).  

      You will not learn anything about a fighting art unless you fight...constantly. This means applying the techniques of your given style as close to reality as possible against someone having a skill level equal to or higher than your own. It means frequently placing yourself in uncomfortable situations so that you learn how to deal with physical and mental stress in a calm and focused way.

      Be it karate, aikido, mma, etc, a serious sensei or coach will create and maintain an atmosphere that poses real danger to you and you will experience pain, especially during the beginning stages of your training. Your body and most importantly your ego will suffer. That's what budo is about. It's not supposed to be a warm, fuzzy experience. If you are seeking enlightenment through martial arts, you simply cannot avoid pain and discomfort because that's where the real training is.

      Things like comradery, respect, trust and friendship happen in places and experiences where people suffer together and are exposed to the same danger and discomfort.   It's not supposed to be like going to a tennis club or the bowling alley. 

      ​It's supposed to hurt.  ​

      Dave Magliano
      Jissenkan Aikibudo
      ​Dojo Cho
        • 2
        Kathryn Carson My caveat is, MA is supposed to hurt...according to each student's ability to take and dish it. Realistic training *must* be balanced against potential injury, especially for folks with medical issues (like myself) or for special needs kids (like an increasing percentage of our student body). As an adult, I've learned to respect my body enough to be honest about what I can do on any given day. (Cancer will do that for you, fast.) But a special needs child requires an experienced, focused, and careful teacher to help them prove *to themselves* what they're capable of. And (to start at least) MA shouldn't hurt (much), or the student might bail--because, frankly, for many special needs kids, life already hurts...a lot. Yet some of the toughest, most amazing students begin far behind the proverbial ball.
        • 2
        S.P. Sorry to slightly disagree and to totally agree with Jerry Fielden more. In 50-some years of martial arts, there's been bearable pain, and other pain that literally drove home the point of why and how to block, avoid and/or counter.
        There have also been times when the option of some kind of protective pad, etc. would have made it more possible to get to work the next day; or like last night, try to walk my 4-legged dog when I could barely use 1-1/2 of mine due to (probably self-inflicted due to over-exuberance) my lower shin having swelled up like a ripe mango.
        That said, working in a corporate setting, going to school where bullying may arise, can also be painful.
        I suggest a bit of flexibility: what may be painful to some, may be educational for others; and for some, make them give up when they in fact hoped to continue. JMO.
        • 1
        Bill Emmes Hello Dave,

        Over the many years of studying Ju-Jitsu, I can honestly say that the impact used during our workouts and especially during the belt testing, was as realistic as it could get as compared to being attacked on the street. Yes we used control and a lot of trust and respect is placed on each other during the workout. But I still went home with bruises, swollen lip(s), cauliflower ears, sore joints.

        During our practice, we start with plastic knives, etc, but the real testing and practice was with real weapons and true aggression from the Uke. Believe me, if a punch was to be at the face, if it didn't go there, it was a poor attack and simply useless for the Tori. If the punch went where it was intended and with some emphasis, the outcome of the technique was so much more satisfactory. If the attack was weak, so was the resulting technique. This is not what happens on the street. So this type of training was beneficial to my success in Ju-Jitsu. Yes....it hurts and if it didn't, chances of my survival on the streets or in a real fight, slim to none.

        In my opinion, anything less than this simply installes a false sense of security on the ability to defend yourself properly. Granted, we all practice slowly, with caution to understand the technique completely and differentiate what we do to end the threat...subdue or injure.....strike a vital area of the body for a simply punch or control the situation. But at the end of the day, if I could defend myself successful in class, I really was not worried about a street surprise At least my fellow students and instructors would take me to the hospital if needed.

        I do watch students in other schools treat their training like a fun time at the gym. I never say anything as it is not my place to ever correct another instructor if i am not a student of the same school. But I fear that the day comes when they need to call on their training, it will fail them as they will most likely panic or pull back and the attacker will hurt them seriously.

        Just my opinion, but if you never took a hit or a good punch, it is hard for me to imagine one might be able to respond accordingly to areal situation. Once you take that hit....you learn real quick how not to ever take another one. and if the attack is weak, the technique you execute is also week....so you find yourself telling your Uke...HIT ME....

        Bill
      • 13 more comments
      • 3
      New member here: Share my experience
      New member to BB Wiki community and want to publish my first post and share my experience.
      First, I am 66 years old, and have been practicing Tae Kwon Do, with Shotokan as the present discipline.
      When I was in my 20's I studied TKD under Master Ky Yung Kim for 2.5 years, attaining senior brown (at that time soon to be black belt). Life got in the way and I left the discipline but it never left me.
      Many years later my oldest grandson expressed karate interest due to me showing him moves when he was old enough to imitate, watching Bruce Lee, Karate Kid, and other movies. After he attained specific goals I set for him I sponsored his TKD lessons with my first instructor Master Kim. Unfortunately did not last too long due to Master Kim health issues.
      We moved grandson to another TKD studio where the Sensei had studied under Master Kim. After watching grandson workout I could not ignore my love for the sport and I enrolled as well (at age 64).
      Our Sensei has refocused our training to Shotokan in the last year and it goes very well for me.
      When I first enrolled and started training I had to keep reminding myself I was not 24 again (although in my mind I felt like I was). Muscle memory has stayed with me from long ago and aside from starting over from white belt and occasional stiffness I have made good progress.
      Recently achieved brown belt with the goal of black belt. I like sparring with the younger karate-ka as well as the other well seasoned karate-ka.
      I just have to remind myself I cannot do a flying spin kick anymore as well as I once could.
      Oss
        • 1
        D Waples Hi John

        As 70 years approaches me in 6 days and reading your story I am reminded of my story. I was trained in hand and foot techniques by a Korean Master while serving in the US Army in 1967 before serving in Vietnam. I was intrigued by the dicipline and always wiahed to persue it formally but my duties prevented this.

        It was five years ago that I entered a formal school and finally began training. Presently I am a 1st Dan teaching at a "not for profit" club and loving every minute. I test for 2D next spring. Some days are better than others but if you don't take yourself too seriously and be present in the moment -- I will continue this joyful part of my life.

        djw
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Hi John

        Welcome to the wiki community! Had to laugh at your comment about "reminding myself I was not 24 again". I think that many of us have the same problem. :)

        FYI - You will get more responses to your post when our weekly email goes on the weekend. It reminds some members that we exist! Also glad you posted this as a main message because more people will see it versus being buried on an existing post (i.e. one of a billion comments).

        Will
        Black Belt Wiki
      • 2 more comments
      • 1
      The meaning behind a kata
      I recently learned Bui Ji and I was wondering what the point was to doing some movements especially when some techniques went against my wing chun teachings.
        • 1
        S.P. As have only "dabbled in Wing Chun" - but found it very interesting and wish I could study it devotedly but now is not the time, alas - I have learned sometimes the hard way, to not doubt my teacher and believe that she or he knows what's going on.
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        S.P. Your See-Foo says...?
      • 3
      How do you coach parents to refrain from talking into the karate class to their ...
      First time student with Mom talking from the side of the training area! Who has experience this before and how did it end?
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        Will - Black Belt Wiki Hi Claudell

        In our school, we have a large glass wall that separates the parents (in the waiting room) from the class area. Less chance for them to interrupt.

        If a parent was being rude and interrupting a class, I would tell the parent politely that you are teaching and that they are interrupting the class. This can be done publicly if you want to make sure the other parents know this unwritten rule and/or the interrupting parent is a pain. Or you can pull the parent aside after class and explain the rules to them privately.

        You might also want to put up a big sign on the wall where the parents sit explaining this rule! :)

        Will
        Black Belt Wiki
        • 2
        Hermit I had a little of this from one parent and they were even coaching the boy along from the side, but using different techniques etc due to the fact the dad had been a boxer, it's not easy as it's nice to have a parent actually interested in what their child is doing, but it can be detrimental to the class. In my case our club owner spoke with the parent, not sure what was said exactly but the parent coaching from the side was something our owner did not like either so he dealt with it (also you could see the son hated it lol). I would probably lean towards speaking with the parent in private first, probably explain that I ask the students not to talk during instruction for many reasons, but would probably stress that there is a safety factor so that instruction is heard and not confused. Also that students not speaking during instruction is a respect issue and I would ask anyone sitting in the class, even on the side just watching to have the same respect for the person instructing. Club rules are not just for students, but anyone that is in the club. However while I don't mean in anyway bend to the parent, if you can resolve it on good terms a parent that wants to take an active role in their child's training can be nice when it comes to needing assistance from parents for whatever. Or maybe even end up with an adult student as well if they want to be active in their child's training (although if they were a pain in the butt before.....)
        All in all, the safety side often is a good way to get through to the parent in my opinion.
        • 2
        Celeste R Domke Our new students get a series of emails on different topics. One of those topics is studio expectations for participants and viewers, some of the others are, why do we bow, what is a kihup, etc.
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      • 2
      New member here
      I am currently exploring the possibility of opening a Dojo. There are no Dojo facilities within 100 mile that I feel provide training similar to or holding a like minded training ethic. As a result, I find myself without a reasonable place to train. I currently hold Ni-kyu (2nd Kyu Brown belt) . I fell out of training as a result of divorce, moving out of state and some health issues which, hopefully, are behind me.
        • 1
        Andrew Patterson Well, opening a Dojo and not having Black Belt Credentials may pose a problem for you. Do you have direction and support from Black Belts in your area? I am not saying anything about your skill level at all, just wondering if you have a support system for your Dojo, and if you are going to be able to complete your journey to Black Belt? Potential Students, be this right or wrong, are going to be looking for someone to teach them that are ranked accordingly. It may be an option to open the school and clearly state that you are not YET a Black Belt, but are on the path to earn one, if that is a viable course.
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      helping others
      Something crazy happened to me and I would like the opinion of others.

      I was ironically teaching my wife her first kata in the living, and we heard some blood-curdling screaming. Waiting a bit to see if what we heard was real I jetted outside after the confirmation. It was a woman screaming "leave me alone" "stop it"

      I grabbed my keys for a weapon and went to find the noise. It was the closest thing to me.

      Found the source and it was in a dark alley between two houses. I live in a city by a business district.

      Still kicking myself for not grabbing a flashlight and not having something better as a quick weapon.

      I screamed "STOP" in the dark alley. The ladies screaming kept going. I asked if she was alone and she started talking to me, not in an intelligent way.

      Long story short, the lady was intoxicated. Told her I was going to call the cops and left.

      Was I a hero or an idiot. I was reminded of some things I forgot from my training in the military like a freaken flashlight. Other than my mistakes and things I did right, not running in blind, would you have just called the police or taken action.

      Also, are the other men in the area that came out when they knew it was safe weak? What are your views on these people too?
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        Richie Thanks guys!
        I have been meaning to prep my defense readiness in the house and this just prompted me finally do it.
        • 1
        Dave Magliano Probably would have done what you did. Those of us with military training tend to have that "search and recover" thing ingrained in us. And I wouldn't beat yourself up about not grabbing a flashlight or a better weapon. It was a split second decision and you most likely don't train for the scenarios.
        • 1
        Hermit I think what you did was something that too many people now days will not do, a lot of "men" would go about their business and think it's not their concern (I have no use for that type of person). The fact you went in there to help is a very good trait, that you forgot a flashlight, meh, don't beat yourself up over. It would have been useful yes, but you tried to help as soon as you could, instead of spending the time to get yourself ready. You put yourself into the way of possible harm to help someone else without knowing who, that definitely speaks of your integrity, glad to hear and even though she didn't or couldn't thank you, you deserve it.
      • 2
      30 Day Push-up Challenge
      So, in keeping with my New Year's resolution, I have re-started the 30 day Push Up Challenge. See, I had begun this in late November, early December, along with a renewed commitment to training, but then I injured my back and it was all I could do to go to work. So, now that I am on the mend and feeling less old, I have re-started the process. Training and the push-up challenge, that is. I am averaging about 60 push ups per day. I am going to get to 150 or more per day before this challenge is over. Since I am only three days in to this one, I wanted to know if anyone wants to join me?? I also would like to follow up on an earlier post and see how everyone is keeping with their goals for the New Year! I am off to a good start, seeing that this is the 4th day of 2018, I have already been at the Dojo twice and turned the living room into a dojo once ;) I hope you all are staying motivated and continue to drive on! OSS!
        • 2
        Karin Fourie I’m also in. I hope to be ready for my 2nd Dan later this year. This will definitely help!
        • 2
        Laura Lilley I am in! I am still rehabbing a wrist from Hapkido, but I will start today with 30 and work up to 100....minimum. Good boost before tournament season!
        • 1
        John I will do several sets (3 or 4) of 30, 35 daily. I have to break them into sets due to an old rotator cuff injury. I can press to 50 reps at one time but then my shoulder hurts and it's a step backwards for a while.
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      • 1
      Snow & Martial Arts Training
      Here in the northeast (USA), we are being hit today with a huge snow storm. So my question for the day is how do you deal with your martial arts training when you are trapped at home during a snow storm?

      Do you practice kata in the basement? Take out your home bound frustrations on the heavy bag? Practice your martial arts balance while shoveling the snow? Or just take a nice relaxing snow day & sit at home sipping some hot chocolate?

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 2
        Tracy I consider running for my cardio part of my training. Here in Manitoba we deal with up to -40 degree (celsius) weather and often a lot of snow. I feel satisfaction running through this. The soft snow creates a cushioned landing and the strong winds give a lot of resistance, so it makes you work extra hard to get anywhere. I wear a ski face mask so it's just the snow whipping in my eyes that's a problem. As I run I remind myself this is harnessing my willpower and that I'm unique in my craziness! Of course you'd only want to do this in safe conditions - don't get hit - or lost!
        • 2
        Christopher Adamchek Sipping a cinnamon eggnog chai tea latte while working on writing / organizing / building curriculum for my students
        • 1
        Andrew Brown You go outside wearing only your gi pants and perform 1000 punches, 1000 kicks in the snow. You are a martial artist, not a weak person.
      • 5 more comments





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