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  • New Posts

      • 1
      How to Condition Shins for Muay Thai
      I have been working on a wiki page regarding shin blocks - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/muay-thai-shin-block

      One element is how Muay Thai fighters must work on conditioning their shins in order to manage any pain associated with a shin block (or shin kick). Therefore, I thought you might like to watch this video. I would also like to hear your thoughts on shin conditioning.

      Do you actively work on conditioning your shins? Or you don't really care because you only fight/spar with shin guards on? Or does your style not often employ shin-related blocks & kicks?

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
      http://www.blackbeltwiki.com
        • 1
        James I dont do anything in particular to condition shins it just happens during the course of training through kicking the heavy bag and through sparring. Shin clashes were unpleasant in the early days but its rare tl even register its happened nowadays. To be honest its pretty rare for me to bother checking low kicks now unless in competition, id rather take the hit and tbe thigh conditioning that comes with it.
        • 0 1 vote
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      • 3
      New Shodan!!!
      Hello BBW community, I would just like to let you know that I passed my shodan test last night. I will try to get a pic or two up. I made mistakes but they just made me more focused when they happened.

      As some may have read my last post, the political stuff was very minimal. I was asked somethings that I never learned but was not penalized for not knowing.

      All in all, I am proud of myself especially for just recovering from the worst flu of my life. This is almost 20 years in the making. Life and ego got in the way when I was young. I didn't understand the value of staying with one style and dojo.

      Thank you BBW community for all the support and knowledge you have given me these last couple months since I have joined. I look forward to more discussions and shared knowledge.
      • 1
      Groin Strikes & Self-Defense
      How much are groin strikes part of your self-defense training? A little, a lot or non-existent? Do you just practice a simple front kick to the groin or do you also practice more sophisticated groin attacks (i.e. with grappling techniques or escape techniques)? Does your school teach students how to defend against a groin strike?

      And finally are you following Master Ken's advice to "re-stomp the groin"? :)

      This topic is supposed to be fun but serious... if that is possible!

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 2
        Richie This has varied so much in my training. I tend to follow my first instructors thoughts on it. It is fragile but it is a small target and has natural defenses. When stressed they retract which makes the target smaller. Also clothes and weight of the person matter too.

        That being stated, treat the spot like the throat or other sensitive area. When available go for it. It will make the attacker think that split second longer even if you miss. By no means should this be a go to, just an option.
        • 2
        Al W Groin Attacks in my club:-
        Hiza Geri
        Kin Geri
        Gedan Zuki
        Gedan Barai (Demonstrating the strike capability of a block)
        Ashi Barai

        In terms of defence:-
        Low blocks
        Hangetsu Dachi
        Sanchin Dachi
        • 2
        James We do a little bit of groin attack in self defense. Sometimes a simple front kick or knee to the area and sometimes in a grappling situation to grab and twist. Thankfully the latter situation is mapped through rather than applued with intent!! Sometimes a groin grab is the only option. Once we were practising escapes from a bear hug from behind. The instructor who is much smaller than me, but as strong as an ox and 5th dan kyokushin as well as holding dan grades in aikido among others and iscwell versed in krav maga just could not get ne off using the techniques that were working on everyone else. Everything was tried including kicking the shins, trying to smash his head into my face all to no avail. The onky thing that made me give him enough room to escape was when he simply put his hand behind him toward my groin to go for the grab! No one likes a nut twist! Well, some do but not for me when delivered by a man that can crush walnuts with his bare hands lol.
      • 10 more comments
      • 1
      Great Article
      Found this gem on Pinterest of all places, the article goes way deeper than what I would have expected.

      I tend to agree with the Shodan part of the article. It is up to the school. My school skill and dedication rules all. Time in grade is small compared to other schools, but VERY few do the minimum.


      http://www.karatebyjesse.com/the-complete-history-of-mcdojos-pt-2/
        • 1
        Rob Wallace Yeah karate by Jesse is a solid resource, can't think of anything bad to say about that site really.
        • 1
        Michael It look me a few days, but I finally got through both part 1 & 2. Very good read. Quite insightful, and impressively provided over 20 sources.
      • 1
      China: Meet Zhang Hexian, the 93-year-old Kung Fu Grandma
      Watch the amazing staff work done by this 93 year old martial artist.

      She is also another example that you are never too old for martial arts training.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
      • 1
      Pressure Point Knockout..?
      I have been taught pressure points. Not in the way this video is showing, but rather places which cause great discomfort with minimal force. This video look a little Dim Mak to me, but maybe something is happening that I just couldn't see well. What kind of pressure point training is taught in your school?
        • 1
        James Having watched that video I am going to change my training routine to include tickling the arm and jaw to ensure I will easily knock out my opponent. I now regret the 100's of hours spent hitting the heavy bag to develop powerful strikes as there is clearly a much easier way. On second thoughts that video is shameless bs lol. While there is some merit in creating discomfort through pressure points I don't see a great deal of value in their use as it requires too precise an approach. If the words pressure point are uttered more than once a year in my dojo I would be surprised.
      • 3
      Martial arts not practical?
      There is a lot of talk both online and offline about MA not being practical for self defense. Every MA out there have been targeted. Kobudo has been deemed unrealistic because most weapons are not found outside the dojo. BJJ has been argued to be only practical on a one-on-one confrontation. Even MMA has been accused of being limited by rules.

      How do you respond to accusations of impracticality of your style for self defense?
        • 2
        Andy [218075,Michael], fortunately nowadays there are some extremely comprehensive lists (composed by a dedicated team of MA experts) available online that tell you how effective your particular style is and in some cases they even go so far as to list the effectiveness of styles in numerical order to make it easier for us dummies who actually train in MA to see how our styles compare to each other.
        • 2
        Al W I'd rather have Martial Arts Training and not need to use it, than to need it and not have Martial Arts training

        It's better to be a warrior in a garden, than a gardener in a war
        -Sun Tzu
        • 1
        Nico Don't think of it as an accusation. Consider the possibility that the other guy my have a point with an open mind. If he does, thank him for the newly gained insight.
      • 7 more comments
      • 2
      Calorie burning workouts needed
      Friends, I am looking for full body workouts to shred pounds that will complement my twice a week Karate Dojo training. I look forward to hearing your words of wisdom as always. David
        • 2
        Michael I replaced soda with water and it made a huge difference. (This was supposed to be a reply to [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki] post. Not sure what happened)
        • 0 2 votes
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        • 1
        Ray Cardio light Weights many reps and cardio. Diet is key though
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki David

        Unfortunately, you have to also worry about the other side of the calorie equation - what is going in (versus what you are burning off). You will need to look at your diet to see what "easy" calories that you can cut off. This will help any pound shedding workout to be more successful.

        Depending on a person's size, etc., the calories in one beer roughly equals the calories burnt off by running 1 mile at a 6 mph pace. So if you can, try to combine any workouts with a better diet (i.e. less calorie packed snacks & drinks).

        Will
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      • 3
      Hello
      Hello to all. I have been watching my 7 year old granddaughter taking lessons. In a year she has earned the rank of yellow belt. She loves Taekwondo, and I have some mixed fighting taught in the Military many years ago. I would like to learn more of the Taekwondo forms. P.S. I am 75 years old retired U.S. Navy.
        • 1
        Hermit Welcome to TKD!! So make sure you get the info from your Granddaughter's school on what disciple of TKD she is in, the 2 main ones are WTF and ITF, and they are very different. WTF follows the taegeuk forms and ITF follows General Choi's patterns (and each will argue that they are better, I tend to think that WTF teaches better kicking but ITF is better well rounded, just my opinion). From there be aware that no matter what you find online, there may be small differences from school to school, online is great learning aids, but just be aware that sometimes a video online will show somethings slightly different.
        Past that, it is never too old to get into if you are so inclined (haha I'm always trying to recruit people) . I got back into TKD after 20yrs, when my son went to a club on a recruitment "bring a buddy" night and found he loved it, I lasted about 2 weeks sitting on the sidelines until I couldn't take it, now I'm teaching at my club and my whole family is involved (wife had run the ofc for about 2 years and just started training). If you have a good instructor they can tailor your learning around what you are comfortable doing, some adults students can't spar or perform some movements just because of what life has done to their bodies, a good teacher will work around this and down the road alot of those students find that they surprise themselves with what they can accomplish after awhile. Martial arts really is a great thing for family members to do together, and TKD is one of the more accepting marital arts in the way that some other MA's are too intensive for younger or older students (not to lessen what TKD can do though!) but if not, that's alright as well, just be supportive. At 7 yrs old she has a long way to go both pyhsically and mentally, sometimes that can be a tough road for a young one, and they might want to quit at times. there are very few people that ever regret learning a martial arts, but alot that might regret quiting one. It's not easy all the time, and kids sometimes need the kick in the butt to keep going. Glad to hear that it took about a year to get a yellow belt, sounds like the instructor might not be puhing too fast, some schools will belt fast to keep the kids interest, but when you get a 10yr black belt they don't learn the value of patience and perseverence. Also then they get bored cause they got their black belt too fast then feel there is no where else to go (sory I'm a firm beliver that below 14 or 16 a kid shouldn't have a BB, even though my son's on track to a BB before that age, most kids just aren't ready. )
        • 1
        KSP08 Welcome to the world of TKD!
        • 1
        Andy Hi [238427,Dan Wilkins], welcome to the community :) you have certainly come to the right place to discover new forms and a whole load of other martial arts information.
      • 6 more comments
      • 1
      Steel Toed Martial Arts Shoes
      I was experimenting with the toe kick's "bend around" groin attack (used when an opponent is standing sideways on) - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/toe-kick

      During this experiment, I was also trying to think how I could avoid breaking a toe (again) and thought maybe I could invent steel toed martial arts shoes (like the steeled toed boots worn at construction sites).

      However, my vision of a revolutionary new martial arts shoe and future shoe empire :) was shot down. Looks like there are lots of steel toed sneakers (i.e. Reebok, Puma, Caterpillar, etc.) - http://amzn.to/2kgCEo0

      Has anyone tried these steel toed sneakers while practicing martial arts?

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 2
        Andy [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki], yes I have on many occasions, in my younger years I had quite a few jobs in the building/demolition trade and always wore steel toed trainers as opposed to the general steel toe work boots or rigger boots and I used to have great fun incorporating MA into my work (especially when it came to smashing stuff up :)
        One thing I will say though is that unless you are used to training with ankle weights, be very careful when performing full speed full power kicks when wearing these (or ankle weights for that matter) as the extra weight makes it very easy to over extend/over lock out the knee which can result in serious injury.
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki FYI - Looks like there are "composite toed" sneakers which are lighter than steel toed sneakers - http://amzn.to/2lAPsGK
        • 1
        timothy i havent

        How would you have named your shoe empire?
      • 5 more comments
      • 1
      Where does your style come from?
      Hi!

      I believe that most members of this community practice japanese arts, or tkd. With the recent post about vietnamese martial arts, I was wondering, how the arts of other countries are represented here. So I thought in this thread we could write down where our (main) art(s) comes from. Not too detailed; as detailed as yu think is necessary

      Think of it as a demographic (?) survey. (:

      timothy
        • 1
        Al W Fujian Province, China via Okinawa and Japan. Or at least that's where I think Shotokan comes from
        • 0 1 vote
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        • 1
        timothy mine comes from (north) vietnam
        • 1
        Michael My style, Isshinryu, comes from Okinawa. Specifically it is a blend of Shorinryu (from Shuri) and Gojiryu (from Naha) and like most Okinawan style it includes kobudo.
      • 6 more comments
      • 1
      Top 10 Most Effective Weapon Based Martial Arts
      Another 'List' Of Most Effective Styles :) (this time weapon based)
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Surprised that this video lists Iaido as the 5th most "effective" weapon-based martial arts. If I can quote Wikipedia... "Dissimilar to kendo, iaido is never honed in a free-competing way". Hard to be effective (in a self-defense scenario) if you are not training free form against a live opponent.

        I am not trying to disparage Iaido as it is a beautiful and dramatic martial arts style that focuses on the sword. Students practice quick cutting techniques and kata. As they progress, they move from wooden swords to metal and thus they must be very proficient with a sword in order to avoid injuries.

        Also why wasn't any weapon-based Kung Fu styles mentioned? Here is our Chinese martial arts weapons section (which I need to expand in the future) - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/kung-fu-weapons

        Will
        • 1
        Luke Gun Jutsui wins every time. ;) I do like the metatron though and i do encourage people to watch is videos. Cant go wrong if the person knows japanese and has gone to Japan. (No insult or argument starter intended)
        • 1
        Andy OK, so this is yet another one of those pointless lists that try to determine the effectiveness of different styles and place one above the other, but disregarding the narrators opinions (again he does have one or two valid points here but not many :), it is however a good representation of some effective weapon based styles.
      • 5 more comments
      • 2
      What martial arts instructor "flaws" irk you the most?
      If you could talk to one of your past instructors honestly (without fear of ten thousand punishment push-ups) :), what would you tell him/her to fix about their school, training, etc.? They may have been a good instructor but had some flaw that kept them from being a great instructor. What was it?

      Were they too easy on passing students?
      Were they weak communicators?
      Were they too tough on students who made mistakes?
      Was their training too monotonous?
      were their techniques impractical?
      Were they too money focused?
      Were they too lazy and rely on others (i.e. senior students) to do the training?
      Did something else irk you?

      Hopefully, your comments will help guide any instructors who might read this post.

      In regards to this question, please do not name any instructors or schools. Thanks!

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        Ray I have many. Tkd instructor. Was all about the profit and knew it. Reason I stopped training tkd.

        First MMA coach was always trying to have sex with the women. Has not won his last 6 fights

        Boxing coach is very good but does not practice what he preaches. He jokes about it. Unless it is fight month.

        Current karate instructor is now what I call a long time friend and the reason I do not loan money any more.

        Most recent is a certain school that will get fights for any one. But not the most qualified. Not sure why yet. But I pulled my support
        • 1
        Michael Full disclaimer: you may have heard this before. Also, my first instructor does make great tournament competitors. However, 2 things caused me to search for another school (which ended up being in a different style). First of all, his entire business model was built around sponsorship from tournaments. This allowed home to have some very low prices for some high quality classes; however, this also resulted in a strategic placement of the promotion exams (immediately after major tournaments, and only twice per year). As a result I cleaned house on my first tournament since I was an a 10th-8th Kyu division but had more experience than anyone else by far. For fun they had me spar with the winner of the next division (same age bracket) and I eeked out a win there too (but a very close match, in which I won only caused I telegraphed a feint and he opened his guard right where I wanted it).

        Essentially I felt that I was held back artificially. If it were a problem with my skill or understanding I could get that, but it was quite clear to me that I was being held back because I would have better chances within my current division. Which brings me to what ultimately made me look elsewhere.

        My last test I was about 18, but still about 90 lbs. part of the reason why I took martial arts is because I couldn't defend myself and it's not hard to push around a kid who is 2/3 the size of everyone else. During the test he would go to each person and have them perform techniques with him. For me, one of the moves he wanted me to perform was an escape from a wrist grab. Perhaps sensei was simply trying to make sure I could effectively get out of a grab and provide a real-life level of resistance; however, I couldn't do it with only one hand (as instructed). I simply did not have the strength to move his arm enough where the technique was effective. Again, this could simply be my impression as a 17-18 year old kid, but it felt like this was more a demonstration to the class rather than part of my test. It felt like the message was "this is why I am the sensei." It also felt like there was a bit of a power trip there. That was my last class with him.

        I ended up seeing him at the store some weeks later and he pointed out that I had a new belt waiting for me at the dojo, but I politely made excuses (I think I said I was too busy with school or work or both). The instructors I have had since then have been great. There are some thins one instructor did better than others, but it has been a blessing being able to learn from them.
        • 1
        Andy [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki], for me it is definitely senior instructors who become (for one reason or another) too bogged down with MA internal politics! In my experience this has had a highly negative impact on the advancement and quality of not just individual students but whole systems and the martial arts in general!
      • 5 more comments
      • 2
      Chuck Norris - New Commercial
      Thought you might like to watch this recent Chuck Norris commercial.

      We might have to add some of these jokes to the Chuck Norris page :) - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/chuck-norris

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
      • 2
      Impression of Someone Asking about Black Belt
      How do you feel about someone who asks "how long does it take to get a black belt?"?

      How would your impression of the person be affected and why?
        • 2
        Jakki In my experience, folks with no martial arts experience ask this question. It's usually phrased, "How long does is take the 'average' person to get a black belt". To which the obvious answer is, "The average person does not get a black belt". That gets a polite laugh most of the time. I can only answer for myself and how long it took me. Everyone is different.
        • 2
        Michael I think everyone ask this question, wether it's for your own style as you are going up the ranks, another dojo, or just deciding which dojo you want to attend when starting up. I think it is a legitimate question. It's the implications behind the question that can hit nerves.

        Some dojo "fast-track" people to promote in 1-2 years to shodan. Students looking for these schools don't want a black belt--they want the status that goes with it but without the work it represents. Most schools don't want to be associated to these fast-track school, so that is some reason to avoid the question. Putting a timeline on it makes it less about personal growth.

        Other schools have a syllabus and a schedule for promotion testing. These schools have no problem answering the question. My previous 2 dojo had a well publicized schedule and grading requirements. In that case, it helped me know how to prepare for my next promotion and I never had to ask the question out loud. It is never a bad thing to keep your students well informed.

        My current dojo has a very personal promotion system. To me, the question is more about expectation management, which can be difficult when there is no syllabus or scheduled promotion test.
        • 2
        James Its not an unreasonable question for someone to ask. Unless the sensei is a long haired moustachioed master from an 80's shaw brothers film awarding black belt after 30 years when you can catch a fly with chopsticks and listen to the sound of one hand clapping most modern schools have a grading tinetable and syllabus so the answer to the question should be to inform them of the minimum time that it is possible to acheive it if they put the work in along with the caveat that the average time is longer than this as they may not be ready of may not pass first time.
      • 30 more comments
      • 1
      Bruce Lee on Honk Kong TV Rare Video, 1969 . Bruce was 28
      Very Rate Bruce Lee Footage (though obviously not THAT rare anymore because i got it off YouTube:)
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki I am surprised that the hopping or skipping side kick is always shown by Bruce Lee. It is a powerful kick but it needs a longer time to execute (as you are hopping/skipping from a distance). You see it mainly as a demonstration kick or in the movies... not as a self-defense or sparring kick.

        I thought Bruce Lee wanted to "use only that which works".

        Here is the wiki's page on the hopping/skipping side kick - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/skipping-side-kick

        Will
        Black Belt Wiki
      • 2
      Yamaguchi Book
      I have the opportunity to get a rare Yamaguchi book at a fair price. The store wouldn't let me get into the book much because of the price. I was just wondering if it is worth it educationally? I don't care how rare it is or valuable.

      https://www.amazon.com/Karate-Goju-ryu-cat-Gogen-Yamaguchi/dp/B0007J7502
      (this is just the book not the price or where I am getting it from.)
        • 1
        Richie I ended up not buying it. I live a simple life and couldn't swallow the 100 bucks for a book. I do not care if someone else thinks it is worth 600.
        • 1
        S.P. AbeBooks.Com has several copies: bad-condition one is $600, good ones $800-$1,600.
        • 1
        Andy Hi [220601,Richie], I would say if you have the opportunity to get a hold of that book at a reasonable price then go for it! I would also highly recommend Sensei Kanazawa's book 'Dynamic Power Of Karate' if you can track down a copy.
      • 5 more comments
      • 1
      Redman Training Suits
      I have just added a section on self-defense training suits - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/self-defense-training-suits

      As you know, these heavily padded training suits are used for self-defense scenarios such as rape prevention.

      Please take a look at the page and tell me if I need to add any more information. I was surprised by how costly some of these suits can be. But I guess that I shouldn't have been surprised given the amount protection these things are supposed to provide for more realistic self-defense training.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        Luke Nonsense, real men dont need nopads. They take the stick beating like a man, thats how you get good bones. :P
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki [171807,Andy]

        Just looked up the cost of American football equipment - Adult helmets can cost $200-$400, shoulder pads $200-$400, etc.

        So the cost of a training suit is not out of line with sports "protective" gear.

        Will
        • 1
        Andy [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki], I wouldn't pay that kind of money for one of these suits (unless it was a gold one that also comes complete with the ability to transform into a dragon Zord! :)
      • 4 more comments
      • 1
      Possible helpful sources for fitness
      I know its not martial arts specfic and it might be short and not announcement worthy but as i dont think i have seen them used in comment. I feel like the sources the public sector puts out there to assist in fitness may be overlooked. for example the U.k army has a app & guide (and maybe book, i forget if its endorsed by them or not) which lays out good progressiona nd exercise to get physically fit. alongside this the fire & rescue service kind of does the same thing. It has some nutritional advice and a guideline on fitness to help you get fit & healthy.

      Forgive links:
      http://www.army.mod.uk/join/Getting-yourself-ready.aspx
      http://www.oncallfirefighter.co.uk/media/1354/fffitnessprogramme.pdf
      (example 2)

      I am not too sure if the police have one or not, you could also try working yourself to their fitness requirements if you want a clear cut objective.

      As always feel free to comment below and i suck at making titles. ( i may edit more links in for example if i find a police fitness guide/advice) I got kind of a shock to my system when i did the equipment carry for fire&rescue at my local stations open day/recruitment drive. That may be a good way to test yourself as well. You might also find good fitness and nutritional advice on the NHS website.
        • 1
        Andy Hi [236584,Luke], personally I think just general exercise and common sense are enough to keep (most people) fit! I believe that some people take the whole fitness thing way too far and in some cases do themselves more harm than good! I like to eat (and drink :) I also train in MA and keep myself relatively fit in order to be able to practice MA and subsequently training in MA keeps me relatively fit! If I had to eat nothing but brown rice and boiled Chicken and drink only water and soya milk then I would start to wonder what is so great about life that I want to prolong it anyway? Excess (which is the bane of 21'st century 1'st world culture) is the root cause of most 'genuine' cases of unfitness, the reason I have highlighted the word genuine is because lots of perfectly healthy people are scared and conned into diet and fitness regimes that are complete nonsense and serve no purpose other than to line the pockets of those who engineer them in the first place! My philosophy is burn off what you put in and eat a varied and well balanced diet! Nothing else is nescesary (unless you have a genuine medical condition which prohibits certain foods and I DONT mean stuck up hypochondriac twats who suddenly decide one morning that they are gluten intolerant because it is currently trendy :)
      • 2 more comments
      • 3
      Solo kumite drills
      There is a heavy bag and not much else that I can use for kumite practice at my local gym. I don't really have someone to spar against in my free time, but I want to train up for a tournament in April. Any suggestions?
        • 2
        Richie For skill- my dojo calls them "T's" they are combos you do over and over again so you don't think about it. Create some combos to get openings or drive the person back. Do this on the bag. When the bag swing back at you step to the side or whatever your style does with an attacker.

        Get some steam going on the bag and work on foot work while the bag swings, wash rinse repeat.

        Get painters tape, put some on the bag and hit your target. get the bag swinging and try to get the point on the high and low points of the swing (footwork)

        RECORD YOURSELF- look at your hands and form, it is super easy to get lazy during solo training and you are your hardest coach

        For conditioning: get a round timer in the app store
        12 rounds at least 2 min each
        Round 1- do combos, jabs, fakes, kicks med power and speed
        Round 2- do high steps and tap the bag like a piston while going around the bag (the punches are just tapping and knees are HIGH)
        Round 3- POWER hit everything you throw, try to knock the person out with every kick and punch you throw

        Do this for 12 rounds
        • 1
        Michael Thanks for all the advice! I have been working the heavy bag, but now I have some pointers to improve my practice. Also, I will be adding in more cardio for endurance. My last practice match went better than I expected, but there were lots of areas I need to improve before the tournament starts.
        • 1
        Luke Try doing Calisphetics or say loaded marches for the leg musces. Apart from that, you could try a tee or a wall as a diffrent type of sit in punching bags if you get bored. You never just have one thing, you have basically everything you can sporterize in your house and gravity. :P (ignore that i only realy like dong strength training with weights) OR if you are really desperate, pick a fight with a duck, goose or Swan. Those animals are brutal.
      • 7 more comments
      • 1
      The Way From Techniques
      The strength of character and moderation ! Senei's have always told students, " the man makes art". We develop courage and fortitude. Emphasis is placed on development of the mind rather than on techniques. For the karate-do student, the most sharmeful trait is indecisiveness ! Mind and technique are to become one in true karate. How do you believe, through the man, techniques become art ?
        • 1
        Michael I have found it more of a mastery of the mind through focus of technique. Correct technique only comes through correction and practical application. The mind wants to go back to bad habits, but the will must bend it to its whim. In Isshinryu, one interpretation of the three stars on the Megami patch is "mind", "body" and "soul" (or "heart" as kokaro has both meanings in Japanese). These are prefectly in alignment on the patch: no one over another. This is part of the purpose of Isshinryu as a MA, to align your soul and your mind while also attuning your mind to all of your body. Personally, I find the art in MA in kata where I can focus on all the fine details of the techniques and try to get my body to hit them all. This focus also sharpens my mind to "the moment", clears our distractions, and I am at peace. The kata is gone when it is complete and the aspiration for perfection begins anew.
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        Andy [199522,PAUL (paldo) REYNOLDS], excellent question Paul Sama! I would say that what makes a true 'artist' in any given field is a true understanding and comprehensive training in and of that given field and also (again as with all arts not just martial) a natural talent/ability to excel in that art! (Not to say that you HAVE to have natural talent to become proficient or even good in any given field) but to become a master takes years of dedication and study and to become truly great does require a degree of aptitude for the given subject (which in the case of MA is there to a certain degreee to begin with which is why people are drawn knowingly or not to the martial arts in the first place) at least that is true for those of us who didn't flunk out after the first couple of weeks or months and found something in MA that we thought was worth pursuing!
      • 2
      Martial Arts Superbowl
      Some call it a tournament and others call it match. I can't imagine anyone practicing on Superbowl day ! What will you be doing ?
        • 2
        James Im in England so Superbowl not a huge thing here. I'll be taking part in a continuous point scoring tournament tomorrow for some mat exposure before my next knockdown tournament in April
        • 1
        PAUL (paldo) REYNOLDS Now that most of us had a short rest from MA, thanks for having some fun with this Super Bowl. Not bragging, just lucky in picking such a close game with the right outcome. This game will go down in history with the first game played in overtime and perhaps the most entertaining, What a comeback ! Go PATS !
        • 1
        Al W I wasn't even aware it was on, which is a shame as I usually record it and watch the next day. I love American Football, imho much better than the football we get in the UK.

        As it was a Sunday, it was my rest day, except from the sneak attacks from the wife in the kitchen
      • 12 more comments
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      Martial Arts Spam
      Do you find yourself getting lots of martial arts spam because of your interest in the martial arts?

      I seem to get a ton of spam from Pakistan martial arts manufacturers, emails from people trying to sell me their old martial arts gear, random messages from supposed "grand masters" with updates about their schools, donation requests to help pay for martial arts training, etc.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
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        Will - Black Belt Wiki As a "public service announcement", here is a list of email scams to avoid - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_email_scams

        Will
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        Jakki The worst is the email from a person, out of the area, that's looking for self defense for themselves or kids, and asks if you take credit cards. It's usually typed in broken English. At the surface it looks legit, but it's a scam. As a school owner and website host, I get this one every couple of months.
        • 1
        Michael There's only 2 places I get stuff from, so I don't really get any either. Like [236584,Luke] this is the only MA forum I use.
      • 23 more comments
      • 1
      Military Combat Taekwondo Competition Advanced.
      Opinions on this? maybe somone who knows how to read whatever language that is and translate too.
      • 1
      Vietnamese Martial Arts (i.e. Vovinam)
      I want to thank Gus Roe for his help on the wiki section about Vietnamese martial arts - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/vietnamese-martial-arts-styles

      He is the author of "The Martial Arts of Vietnam: An overview of the history and styles" - http://amzn.to/2kZI4Ez

      Gus plans to further expand this section over time. I am looking forward to learning more about Vietnamese martial arts. They must be very interesting (and practical) given the thousands of years of conflict in this region.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        timothy I have a french translation of a vietnamese book, which is supposidly the first book "ever" about the history of vietnamese martial arts, by dr pham phong. Though you can debate about the "ever" part, it is i believe the first to give such a complete account. It came out either in 2011 or 2013.
        I'd like to know if Guy Roe knows it and what he thinks of it.
        • 1
        timothy is Gus Roe part of the community?
        • 1
        PAUL (paldo) REYNOLDS @ Will - BB wiki: Taekwondo was highly influenced by U.S. military contract services during the Vietnam War in the early 70's. Korean instructors from Korea taught schools that were mainly set up on U.S.military bases in the southern and east regions of Vietnam where the war was not so intense. I was there and practiced a few months during that time. I do not know if Taekwondo is still there today. Just a helping hand !
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      Black Belts A Collectiion of Martial Arts Fails
      More "Black Belt" action from here, there, and everywhere
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        PAUL (paldo) REYNOLDS Notice; when refocus is applied, the student accomplishes, However, the footing needs a stronger stance and more power in the strikes ! Observation: the boards look a bit to thick for her rank at 1st dan. I could be wrong from viewing this video.
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      • 1
      How to Use the "Kiai" as a Weapon
      Is there anything that Master Ken can't use as a weapon
      • 1
      Training at Dojo: how best to divide time
      What is the best manner to divide a class? If it is an hour class: 20 minutes of warm-up (dynamic and static stretching), 20 minutes of Kata learning and practice, and 20 minutes of kumite? Or is it better to have an hour and a half to two hour class and add in the warm up section conditioning and calisthenics?
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        PAUL (paldo) REYNOLDS Addendum: Dojo Time: Solo training is also very important, even though its not with others. It gives you the time to work on new items and or so-called perfecting your techniques. It's so important to have solo dojo time outside your dojo class. Most beginners don't know this until someone broadcasts it...friendship learning !
        • 1
        Richie Managing dojo time is one of the hardest parts when I took over my class for a month and a half.

        As a student and potential sensei I have never been a fan of broken up dojo time as a standard. It is fine once in a while. Today's karataka, dojo should be only 30% of your training and 90% of your learning. Most do two times a week for 3 hours a week, to be good you need so much more.

        This is why I like a curriculum based lesson plans. With time before or after with sensei for questions and advice.

        *warmup depending on the lesson of the day
        *ALWAYS some kind of basics
        (both of these no more than 20 minutes or so, unless the day is basics or conditioning)
        *then move on to kata, drills, or kumite (pick one)
        *end class with 5 min meditation, chat session, philosophy
        This all depends on class size and skill much like Paul stated.

        My reasoning:
        The first years with my current sensei we had the breakup schedule. Even with my prior experience, it was hard for me to learn a kata enough to practice on my own doing it only 20 minutes in class. I had more questions leaving then when I walked in. Then being the only 5 kyu in the class that 20 minutes was taken up by the beginners and the advanced people. I had to choose whether to practice what I know or go two grades above me till the sensei could get one-on-one time.

        This last year we have moved to the above schedule and the whole dojo has benefited. Everyone gets sensei time, ask questions, and know enough to practice out of the dojo class times. You would think things get slowed down but they don't. You still get 60 min of kata time. Think about the min here and there moving from one task to another, especially kumite with pads. You could be wasting 10-20 minutes of collective class time moving from one task to another.
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        PAUL (paldo) REYNOLDS Manage Dojo Time ! That all depends upon the development of the particular class: beginners, advanced, mixed etc. Sensei's are normally charged with teaching and the assessment of each student in that class. As long as you are productive and make good progress then your class is achieving experience. Flexibility with class time is great because there is always something that takes a bit more time to work on, and dojo time is precious for that, if possible. Large dojos have fixed hours because its basically a business and people have other committments etc. Small dojos are more flexible with time for less amount of classes etc. Overall, I find 10 minutes warm-up of a combination of exercises, run in place, kihon drills for the lower classes is the norm and each class session has a different variety of sparring drills, kata, kumite, bag work, etc. For the more advanced class, exercises and drills, kata, kumite, combat techniques, will be alternated, then more advanced work on a progressive agenda toward meeting goals for 1 1/2 hr. class.
      • 6 more comments
      • 1
      Shodan test (two weeks)
      I have my Shodon test in two weeks. I am super crazy nervous though. I have invited my family and friends, one a shodon in another style.

      I know my stuff and I am confident in my abilities. What makes me nervous is we have and are still going through some leadership changes. My sensei is "catching" up to our new ways and I am the first Shodan test under the new instructor.

      The key for me is I don't want to be made a fool in front of my guests. I invited them to show my skills and be there on this special day. Our Henshi "kind of" told me what to expect, so I have been studying It is still freakin' me out.

      I had a dream last night that I forgot how to tie my gi pants. Not my belt, my pants.

      Any suggestions on people that have done these types of "anything goes" shodan tests?
        • 1
        KSP08 I just had my second Dan test in November. I was the only adult and there was only one junior testing with me, so that made me more nervous than normal before the test. My master instructor tells us that he won't ask us anything that we can't do, so I repeat that to myself when I worried. And we all make mistakes during the test- the real test is to just keep going. Enjoy the experience (and honestly, some parts aren't really "fun"). My last test was my most difficult but my favorite as well- I smiled more during it than I did on any other. Best wishes for a safe and successful experience!
        • 1
        Richie An update, I have just recovered from being IN BED for 5 days.

        To my body,
        Thanks for stressing me out even more, I hoped you would have fought off that sickness but you failed. Make it up to me and don't break down on test night.

        Loving you always,
        my brain
        • 1
        Christopher Adamchek you know your stuff
        the instructor is unlikely to try and have you do something that you will mess up
        and if they do - they want to see your recovery
        Mistakes are fine, its how you recover that really counts
      • 3 more comments
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      Knife Defense from Master Ken
      This is the reason that you practice weapon disarms with plastic weapons and not the real thing. :)

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        Al W That cameraman has failed to carry out Master Ken's instructions
        • 1
        Luke but, but but. Where is the revolver to shoot them and then eat the knife? I also dislike the lack of fruit, 2 ton weights and tigers.
      • 1 more comment




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