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  • New Posts

      • 1
      10 Popular Actors With Serious Martial Arts Skills In Real Life!
      Actors Trained In MA
        • 1
        Andy Here are some more celebrities with MA training http://community.blackbeltwiki.com/post/3636762/celebrities-who-are-black-belts
      • 4
      Is realistic self-defense training a contradiction in itself?
      There are countless providers that claim to offer realistic self-defense training. Routinely implied in in such claims is that other, more traditional schools/dojos/styles fail to address this. However, I am wondering if realistic self-defense training is possible at all. Here are some thoughts, and as always, any feedback is greatly appreciated:

      Self-defense training can never be realistic because...

      … it takes place in a non-threatening environment. There is (hopefully) no hostility, no name calling, no intimidating etc. You know your training partners, the instructors and the location. The training starts and ends at a specific time. You go there for the purpose of training self-defense and are in a corresponding state of mind, that is, you know that you will, in one way or another, engage in attacking and defending.

      … your training partner will never attack with the same determination as the “bad dude” on the street or in a bar. A training partner doesn’t act in blind rage and is cautious of possible counter attacks. This leads to a rather different dynamic.

      … there are implicit or explicit dos and don’ts in the dojo (e.g. no groin kicks, no eye gouges). You’re neither allowed to apply such “illicit” techniques, nor do you have to worry that your partner might.

      Or course I’m not suggesting that self-defense training is futile, but I think it’s very important to remember that no matter how and where you train, it can only ever be a rough approximation to a real self-defense situation.
        • 1
        Andy Here is a link to a genuine expert on the reality based application of traditional martial arts (my father used to work for him as a security supervisor in a large shopping mall and before anyone makes any 'mall cop' jokes, you should know that the 'real' stuff they had to put up with on a daily basis was in many cases worse than what I had to contend with as a bouncer!)
        http://peterconsterdine.com/portal/
        • 1
        Guillaume Chan Hey @nico, this is a really interesting topic. I just wanted to react to your different points and add some others that could help you with your thinking.

        1 - You're totally right. Fortunately, some schools are getting very creative in order to train you for real situation. Some exercises can be done to put you in a stress state to practice your techniques. For example, sparring against two opponents is a great exercise to work on your self-control and cardio because this is really oppressive. Another could be to close your eyes, turn spin around for a few seconds and when you opened your eyes someone attacks you.

        2 - Unfortunately, I think you're right.

        3 - This depends on which fighting sport you practice. Some, like Krav Maga or Systema, totally encourage to kick your partner in the groin even in the dojos. It just depends on your school methods and of course our partner will have to wear adequate protection. Many traditional martial art schools tend to change toward a more self-defense approach.

        To conclude, I would say that it's true, you will never be able to simulate real life aggressions but you can try to get as close to it as possible and that will already make a huge difference. Secondly, practicing self-defense is not all about techniques. It also teaches self-confidence and attitude. Self-confidence may dissuade more than one assailant. Attitude may teach you to avoid threatening situation or how to react to it.
        • 1
        Christopher Adamchek i agree with the rough approximate to real self defense situation
        but..
        - i introduce realistic acting where for the time of the training drill, i am not your instructor or friend, ill call you names, intimidate you, and push you around.
        - i dont hit to kill or mame, but an attacker is going to try and hit my students so i owe it to them to try just as hard to hit them.
        - i have some of my students train using "illicit" technies in these same drils, and i use them on my students showing them better how someone might fight, in one drill i went right for his throat grabbing the cartilage of his trachea

        your right that you can only get close, but i aim to make that "close" as close as possible
      • 2 more comments
      • 1
      Moderation
      I am sorry that (for the first time) I felt the need to get all moderatory :) Unlike (a certain member) I do not feel the need to continually brag or boast (or lie) about my rank or experience, rather I would hope that my words on this community and my additions to the wiki convey my experience! I will say though that there is a reason why my good friend Will (who has access to my personal credentials and experience through much correspondence) asked me to help moderate this community before it went online. I admit (and have apologised for) the the fact that I sometimes have a tendency to favour the more practical/actual fight based aspects of MA over other aspects, but I do genuinely appreciate ALL aspects of ALL martial arts! One thing I can not tolerate though is outright falsehood as it not only perpetuates a false perception of the martial arts but also shows a lack of respect for both self and others and overall low moral fibre (which is an aspect that genuine MA training seeks to overcome), so I apologise if I may seem a little harsh with my moderation but I assure all members that I only have the integrity and well being of this community at heart!
      • 1
      TONY JAA visits KRUDAR MUAY THAI
      Tony Jaa Muay Thai Demonstration
      • 1
      Holding back.
      This week i sparred a vastly imferior fighter. The whole point was to get him ready for his first fight. He will in my opinion not win. I held back on every strike because even out of shape i am faster and more acurate/powerful than he is. Or so i thought. after his fight i will with his permission
      post the video. The video was made for training. So that he could see his flaws. Any way. Holding back actually made most of my strikes look weak and in effective. Since i was only going 20 percent he esaily countered strikes that would have clearly made contact. I am wondering if any others have experienced this. The video made me look like a poor opponent. Of course next week no video will be allowed. And we go 80% i assume i look better then. But no video exists, for obvious reason. Any one else have this issue?
        • 1
        Andy @Ray, at my last Wado dojo we had a circular Kumite drill where each student would have to spar with every other student (regardless of age style or rank), we had quite a few kids (the youngest a 6 year old) and it was often hilarious (with me a 6 foot 3, 18 stone former bouncer squaring up to a 6 year old boy or an 8 year old girl :) I would pretty much just assume the roll of a living BOB and encourage the younger students to just hit me as hard as they could to help build their strength and confidence (with the added bonus of extra conditioning for me and a good deal of amusement for the more senior practitioners :)
        • 1
        James [217441,Ray] just wondering if he was easily countering strikes while you were only going at 20% as hes training for a fight why you didn't step it up a notch to make it more challenging for him?
        • 1
        Christopher Adamchek I used to have this issue
        A couple of students of mine were completely oblivious to fatal t strikes i sent their way and then they would feel amazing that they got a mediocre hit on me

        I realized i was waiting for them to see it and that is what allowed them to counter and look like the better opponent

        To solve this i pulled strikes juat a little but less and didn't bother waiting for them to see it, not to be mean but o juat overwhelmed them with effective moved till they saw it

        And it helps both become a better fighter
      • 2 more comments
      • 2
      Inspiring people
      I am starting to decorate my garage and I like the look tons of pics on the wall. So I am reaching out to all of you for people to put on my wall. I am looking for people that have faced diversity or over came something in the fighting arts. Looking for women, minorities, or masters. Basically, people that have spread the martial arts of any kind.

      For example: I have some female Judoka and boxers, Vic Moore, Bruce Lee, Muhammad Ali

      Give me your ideas and I will do the research to see if they inspire me and fit in with my philosophy.
        • 2
        James [220601,Richie] from the world of kyokushin id suggest Mas Oyama, Judd Reid, Andy Hug
        • 2
        Andy @Richie I hope you have a picture of Master Ken on that garage wall (and a fith wall devoted entirely to Chuck Norris! :)
        • 1
        Erica I recommend Alexandra Fuller, as she is a great inspiration in a fighters journey.
      • 12 more comments
      • 2
      How to use a chair to practice high kicks
      Since we have been talking about Bill "Superfoot" Wallace's amazing flexibility and kicking prowess, I thought you would like to watch this Youtube video. It is a tutorial by Bill Wallace on how to use a chair to practice high kicks.

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        Andy Here is a recent interview with Bill Wallace and as you can see despite his age he is just as full of energy and enthusiasm as ever, a true legend! https://youtu.be/eW7S4J7NzPM
        • 1
        Andy [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki], another excellent instructional from Mr Wallace, I am sure the mans DNA is composed of rubber and elastic! :)
      • 1
      Black Belt Genie
      Let's say that one day you discover a Magic Lamp and out pops a Genie who will grant you 1 wish.
      The wish he'll grant you is to make you an expert in the Martial Art of your choice. You'd have all the knowledge and skill associated with this art as if you had been training in it your whole life, as well as the acknowledgement of people within that art.

      What art do you choose?

      Personally I am torn between Judo and Aikido, as I trained for a short time in both styles during my service in the RAF.
      But I am also tempted by BJj, Kobudo, and Kendo
        • 1
        James Id without a doubt firstly choose the art that I do now - I love it for a reason so its an easy choice. If choosing a secondary art to magically become proficient in it would be a weapons based style such as Arnis
        • 1
        Ray All jokes aside i think i would go with.... What I already know. Just be better at it.
        • 0 1 vote
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        • 1
        Ray That stuff that works on t.v.
        • 0 1 vote
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      • 5 more comments
      • 2
      Karate Kakie practice
      I was curious how many of my fellow karateka here practice kakie

      it is a series of "pushing hands" drills - which accept and flow off of an opponents incoming momentum as well as how to effectively push an opponent
      It is sometimes also described as "Karate's Aikido"
      here is a beginner video if you have never seen or heard of it before
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jzPErd8FXyw

      Do you practice it?
      Do you train it for realistic applications?
      Do you use it with your regular karate kumite?

      I was thinking i might do a video on it next week / in a few days
        • 1
        Nico When I trained Okinawa Goju-Ryu we practised kakie. To me it isn't so much force against force but rather deflecting or receiving force. And yes, I agree we are in "Wing Chun and Tai Chi territory" here. BTW, I never managed to apply it in kumite (as a 1. Dan...), my Sensei did, though.
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Chris

        Is Kakie specific to any Karate styles? Or is it universal to all Karate styles (but not practice much)?

        Will
        • 1
        Al W Sounds like Wing Chun? May have to investigate this
      • 12 more comments
      • 1
      This is the most Hardcore fight you will see. Ever!
      There are no words to describe how viscious this fight is.

      Please be warned 18+ only
      • 1
      Special Forces Strength Training
      Here are a few "easy" exercises to spice up your next martial arts strength training workout. I like how he incorporates grappling dummies and plyomterics into his workout.

      If I had to do this training routine, I would be losing body parts after a few minutes. :)

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
      • 1
      Let's play Detective
      My instructor and I were talking about the upcoming Power Rangers film, and how it would be different to the original series.
      He then started to tell me of a movie he saw in the 80's that seemed to follow a similar formula to power rangers, where kids are granted special powers.
      The kids would raise their hands in a position similar to the opening of Kanku Dan and get turned into ninjas, each with a different coloured sash around their waists. At the end of the film they lose their powers.

      As you can expect he cannot remember the name, just snippets of information. Can anyone on BB Wiki help me track down this wayward 80's movie?
        • 1
        Al W He says he rented it in VHS sometime between 88-90. So it was before the Power Ranger boom of the early/mid 90s
        • 1
        Andy @Al W here are a few candidates though to be honest it doesn't sound like any of these fit the bill either http://screenrant.com/power-rangers-ripoffs/?view=all
        Are you sure your Instructor didn't just eat too much cheese one night and dream the whole thing? :) I'll have to dig through my Ninja Movie collection and see if any of those are likely candidates.
        • 1
        Michael Well, I remember the Voltron cartoon from the 80's which was literally the same plot as the power rangers. But I can't recall a similar movie.
      • 2 more comments
      • 1
      Unarmed vs bo - sparing
        • 1
        Richie HA ha ha, that was super funny.

        On a serious note, I like your guard!
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Ha! That is like a scene from Monty Python where you both disappear off screen and suddenly things are reversed (with the attacker running away and you have the Bo).

        Will
      • 3 more comments
      • 1
      Notifications button
      Just realized i dont have the notification button when I'm on the mobile community site.

      Any chance that is coming soon [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki]
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Do you mean the little "flag" button on the PC version? Unfortunately, what you see on the mobile version is what you get. I will mention it to the software company but doubt that anything will happen for a long while as they are working on a large project.

        Alternatives - Check the "Comments" page or wait to get an email notification that someone replied to you.

        Will
      • 0
      Dealing With Serious Injuries !
      Serious injuries usually have extreme consequences that prolong practices, promotions, and careers progression. Those who have experienced these effects profess the good side of healing without long term effects, and there are those of negatives with mental trauma and or physically bearing the crises of the unknown fallout or reprecussions. What have you experienced as a serious injury, how did you overcome it, and how did it effect your continuation of karate or any other marttal arts ? For me, it's another hurdle, challenge, and test of my devotion to the Japanese karate-do ! Perhaps your response would help others in sharing your case to those who are currently facing hardship with a serious injury !
        • 2
        Andy Minor injuries (to name a few :)
        Broken left hand, fractured right tibia (just below the knee) fractured ribs, fractured knuckles (both hands on more than one occasion) broken toes (again both feet on more than one occasion), fractured right elbow (still have something floating about there now), numerous cuts (some superficial some not so (which I superglued as I hate stitches and hospitals in general lol), I not only trained through these (and other) injuries but never sought medical attention for them either. Tough? (I thought so at the time but now in older age realise I was just *******
        stupid and wouldn't have half the pains lumps or bumps I now
        have HAD I sought medical attention! Serious injuries, had my lower right leg and ankle crushed between 2 forklift trucks at work (I now have a titanium graft on my lower right tibia and titanium screws either side of my right ankle (this I DID have medical treatment for) and was told at the time to forget about martial arts (and that I would be lucky to be able to walk properly again! I was off training for over a year with that one)! More recently, a sprained
        knee (last year) which wasn't too serious but cost me a couple of months off training, also the year before I managed to hospitalise myself for the third time (first before my leg crush was an emergency appendectomy) with a trapped nerve in my neck/shoulder (due to overdoing push ups/Physical training in an attempt lose a few pounds I had put on over the Holliday period to get into a tailored suit I had foolishly bought for a Christening before
        the Hollidays)!
        • 2
        KSP08 Sprained MCLs in both knees (separately) as a colored belt. I didn't really take much time off for either one, and as a result they took a very long time to heal.

        Mild concussion- got a MRI because I had headaches for weeks and doctor told me no sparring for 3 months. I returned to point sparring afterwards but my training partners limit head contact. They've been great about being extra cautious.

        Partial rupture of plantar fascia ligament- this was 8 weeks before my test to move up to 2nd Dan, so I had to train but try to get it to heal, too. For first two or three weeks, I went to a pool and did laps, tread water, and did kicks under the water. I also "boxed" (without footwork), to maintain arm conditioning and cardio. I was able to test with minimal pain 7 weeks later.

        Finally, I am currently healing from a bad bone bruise on top of my foot- I've been hobbling around for 3 weeks but about healed up. During the first 2 weeks, I just did abs, push-ups, and kicked with theraband restraint, supporting my injured foot by kneeling on a chair. Used a lot of ice, braces, and epsom salt over last 4+ years!
        • 0 2 votes
        • Reply
        • 1
        James Lots of minor injuries really nothing too serious and I just train around them Cracked ribs, broken hand broken fingers, broken toes.The most recent one which has been a source of frustration is a strained hamstring around a month ago which has been hampering my training which is getting better but not ideal when I have a major tournament coming up in just 2 weeks which is also the main reason ive not been very active here, training has been taking its toll. Competitors coming from UK, netherlands, spain, canada, kuwait, russia to name a few and I still have a slightly gammy leg. Can now kick high again but with insufficient power and at the back of my mind is if i pull it too hard i will be out of the tournament. Careful balance to strike to get it ready without causing a big set back.
      • 20 more comments
      • 1
      Matt Page - The man behind Master Ken
      When I first started watching Enter the Dojo I had no idea that Matt Page (Master Ken) was a martial artist. As it turns out I was wrong.

      http://www.karatebyjesse.com/master-ken-enter-the-dojo-youtube-show-with-matt-page/
      • 1
      Chuck Norris Game
      Chuck Norris has recently launched his own mobile game here is the article (that also has some more fun 'Chuck Facts' sprinkled through :)
      http://www.mirror.co.uk/tech/chuck-norris-launched-smartphone-game-9997607.amp
      • 1
      Servicing MA To Your Community
      There are substantitive ways to provide and promote martial arts to your community. Is this really necessary ! There's doorway signs, media announcements, town newspaper ads, etc. But the most inspiring tactic the public appreciates is a personal speech to present them. Do you service martial arts in your community and how ?
        • 1
        PAUL (paldo) REYNOLDS Once a quarter one of our top level sensei's and an assistant provide a town hall demonstration and cross-talk conference to 1 of 12 surrounding cities and towns as community relationships and recruitment. The community finds it unusual to hear strict Traditional Japanese standards that protray karate. The organization is bound on development more than on a profit margin. Additionally, monetary discounts are good incentives to membership for steady attendance, two or more family participants, disadvantaged, elderly, honorary testing student, and free membership to all U.S. military veterans with proof. Standard yearly programs are advertised on the website such as: tournaments, promotions ceremonies, banquets, and visitors seminars. The childrens program has a significant amount of events catered to there age groupings up to age 17. A
        special seniors program features an assortment of karate and Tai Chi forms and other exercise programs. Soft oriental music is permitted for seniors classes only. We ask for employers to sponsor our organization publically. Should visitors visit our dojo they are reminded to afford a respectful and quiet Japanese atmosphere.
      • 3
      Training outside of the Dojang
      As much as I love to learn and practice Tae Kwon Do and Kumdo Kendo (Korean Kendo) in the ideal settings of the dojang, I find it important to also practice periodically outside of the studio. There have been times when my neighbors would see me doing my patterns and routines in the midst of a snowstorm. We must remember that martial arts originated out of necessity to adapt to all diverse conditons, including the battlefield. Unlike the heated or air-conditioned studios, where temperatures, light and floor surfaces are ideal, training outside forces us to be more adaptable to variable conditions that could impair our efforts to utilize our techniques. Try doing a sword pattern in sub-zero temperatures, or spinning kicks on a wet grass and you will realize that there is a greater foe to conquer than a human opponent. Rain, snow and a lack of light can defeat you before ever get to fight Actually, outside, you will start to develop an acute sense of balance. You will develop a sense of touch with feel your feet on the uneven ground and use your hearing for direction in the dark. The Fifth Kumdo Sword Kendo pattern at first appears slow and boring. I was granted a new perspective when I performed the pattern in pitch dark. I realized that the pattern stressed caution and initiative in all actions. You literally felt your way with your feet slowly and after determining where your opponent is, striking straight with lightning speed. and then pausing again to get reoriented again. The mixture of slow caution and full power in the strike is so exilarating. I remember thirty years ago training in Dojang in downtown Seoul, South Korea where we trained on old wooden floors and the temperature and humidity was almost unbearable in the unconditioned training studio on the top floor of an ancient building. I lost at least 6 lbs of sweat per practice. The good side of things was that in sparring, I knew every time a made contact on my opponents with my kicks and punches because you could see my wet footprints and fist marks. Was it ideal? No. Did I regret having to endure such conditions? Absolutely not! These were the conditions that my Korean hosts endured daily and it was a humbling experience for me to share these conditions with them. Out of these dojangs came world champion athletes and who would put us westerners to shame. I will finish by saying that training outside was not always a difficult experience. There were nights out in the fresh air when I was lost completely in the exercises and patterns, even when snow was falling around and I was oblivious to the conditions. The fresh air was exhilarating and I moved one step more towards the elusive goal of perfection.
        • 2
        PAUL (paldo) REYNOLDS A God-send thread ! @ Matt C: Oh Man, This Hit Home To Me ! A testimonial to what I've been describing previously as Korean outside do jang (dojo) karate training.

        I was in Korea practicing Taekwondo and Tong Soo Do as a U.S. military serviceman and practiced with the S. Korean Army Special Forces at Osan Air Base in the early 70's. You have discribed the outside winter conditions perfectly in relations to outside dojo practices, in which we did when the temperature got around 10 degrees. Those who have not experienced practicing in servere cold and wintery snow conditions can not say we were lollypops, we were tough as the Korean Army Special Forces in Vietnam who had reputations for not giving up any land they conquered, and the Viet Cong were freightened of there fighting tactics of which I personally witnessed in Vietnam...another time for those stories, but I would rather not for distrubance of my PTSD with war etc. Your thread is evidence to previous threads I've written here on the wiki community on the outside dojo in Korea under inclement weather conditions. Additionally, we had to learn Korean to converse with the sensei's teachings for he did not speak any English. It was a hard task, but with our assets of the S. Korean Security Forces on base we were tutored enough to have viable communications with our Korean instructor. He made us tough and we respected him immensley. I firmly believe that experience in Taekwondo in Korea set a pattern of discipline and toughness as a young man that carried me through and up to my elderly years of today. It was that instilled tough attitude that got me through rigid practices and promotions to excel to the level that I am now. Toughness is my inspiration to karate ! Your thread is my fresh air. I'm Highly Gratified !
        • 1
        Andy Hi [185700,Matthew Callaghan] and welcome to the community :) nowadays I predominantly train outdoors (usually in the early hours in darkness) and in 'most' weather conditions (I usually give torrential rain a miss lol), I also train with a wide variety of weapons in such conditions and wholeheartedly agree with some of the excellent points you have raised.
      • 1 more comment
      • 1
      Help for beginners
      If I have ever practiced martial arts before, what is the first exercise to do in my learning career of taekwondo ? I need a help.
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki You need to follow [171807,Andy] 's advice and join a Taekwondo school. They will teach you all of the introductory forms, kicks, self-defense techniques, etc. that you need. Online information & videos should only be a modest supplement to what you learn from a real instructor (who can correct your flaws, etc.) and training with real partners (i.e. fellow students).

        Will
        • 1
        Andy Hi @Roger Ramer and welcome to the community, I notice on your profile that you mention your experience is Taekwondo but I am assuming from your question that you are a beginner (and that you have missed an 'N' and that your post should read "if I have never practiced martial arts before". If this is the case, then the first thing you should do (if you haven't already) is look for a dojang in your vicinity then take it from there. In the meantime you can research the martial art you are interested in (Taekwondo in your case) here on the wiki.
        http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/taekwondo
        • 1
        PAUL (paldo) REYNOLDS The same as you did before, however, if its formal, then follow the instructor.
      • 1
      Progressive Karate Classes ! Why Agree or Disagree.
      Good karate classes usually have a few leaders who excell in practice attendance, and be more reliable in the executions of kata techniques and in kumite. This usually starts the framework of an established class towards reliability to create formitable and consistent progress towards goals. Agree or disagree and why !
        • 1
        Michael Agree. Generally speaking, your class leaders reliably attend class and have the dedication and discipline to refine their skills as an appropriate example for others to model themselves off. While there are always going to be naturally talented individuals, or those who have experience in other styles which do not necessarily conform to this generation, it is the norm I have come to see.

        However, I find the framework of a class to fall squarely on the instructor. First, there needs to be some kind of consistent norm. Then there needs to be the opportunity for "today's lesson". This allows the class to feel consistent and yet new and refreshing at the same time. While these advanced students can help make class easier, the framework should still exist even without them.
        • 1
        Ray Disagree. Due to schedule. Sometimes i can only train 1 x a week. And its no secret that kata is at the bottom of my list. Agree. When there is no boundry i will and have taken a nap at the gym between classes.
      • 1 more comment
      • 2
      worlds fastest left kick bill superfoot wallace -2
      Bill Wallace Instructional Video
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki I don't know what age Bill Wallace is in this video... but for an 45 - 55? year old, he is incredibly flexible and has tremendous control of his kicking placement. I also liked that hook kick deception technique.
        • 1
        Andy For any of our younger members who have never heard of Bill Wallace he was in his day at the forefront of full contact karate/kickboxing along with the likes of Chuck Norris and Benny 'The Jet' Urquidez. Here is his Wikipedia profile
        https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Wallace_(martial_artist)
        • 1
        Andy Just to prove that there is some excellent MA related stuff amongst the tons of crap on the internet :) Here is a master class by MA Legend Bill 'Superfoot' Wallace.
      • 3 more comments
      • 1
      Top 10 Self Defense Martial Arts Styles
      This video looks at the top ten martial arts styles focused on self-defense. Do you agree with this list? Are they missing any obvious PURE self-defense candidates?

      It is a well produced video but there are couple of martial arts styles on this list that I was surprised to see (i.e. they are more sports-oriented or more questionable for a self-defense scenario).

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
        • 1
        Will - Black Belt Wiki Which martial arts styles would you kick off this list? And why?
        • 1
        Andy [171668,Will - Black Belt Wiki] Nooooooo!!!! The lists, the lists! Make them stop! 😩
        Hmm, Judo (and BJJ which was actually derived from Judo and not Jujutsu) yet no mention of traditional Jujutsu??? being as Judo is a sport form of Jujutsu (with most of the more deadly techniques as well as kicks and strikes either taken out completely or modified to
        make the sport safer) and that apparently any other forms of Karate other than Kyokushin aren't even worth an honourable mention (no offence meant to Kyokoshin as it Is a full on style that I personally respect) so yes, another very well informed and totally accurate list! :)
        • 1
        PAUL (paldo) REYNOLDS I do not believe in one sytle over other styles, however, self-defense was addressed and Korean - Tong Soo Do was not mentioned, its all grappling self-defense techniques that are focused on killing techniques formed for military defense. Other countries like the USA, UK, Australia militaries have adopted Tong Soo Do in there special forces. P.S. I also not found of Judo / Kali in answering this scanerio.
      • 8 more comments
      • 1
      Actionflex bo vs bo
      Since fun bo sparing
      • 1
      Importance of Kiai in Karate & Kihap in Taekwondo
      What do you think is the most important reason for a loud Kiai (Japanese martial arts) or Kihap (Korean martial arts)?

      Confidence booster?
      Help to generate greater striking power?
      Battle scream to intimidate opponents?
      Focus internal Ki?
      Learn proper breathing?
      Something else?

      Moreover, is a loud Kiai or Kihap important? Or do you believe in the concept of a silent internal Kiai/Kihap (which is practiced by some martial artists)?

      Wiki page on Kiai - http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/kiai

      Will
      Black Belt Wiki
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        Christopher Adamchek also, many athletes use a variant of a kiai
        ever watched womens tennis? lol - its particularly noticeable
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        PAUL (paldo) REYNOLDS a fighting yell combining spiritual and physical energy of the body, spirit, breathing converge at the highest point of concentration, e.g., strike, and in breaking material also.
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        Will - Black Belt Wiki I have listed the following Kiai benefits on the wiki. Please let me know of any other benefits and/or if the ones below need to be modified.

        Kiai Benefits

        * Generate more power by engaging core muscles
        * Loud "battle scream" can startle or intimidate an opponent
        * Boost internal confidence and reduce internal fear
        * Forceful exhalation can reduce the chance of wind being knocked out of the martial artist during a strike
        * Forces martial artist to breathe versus tensing up and holding breath
        * Loud Kiai can act as a warning to others and/or attract attention & possible help
        * Possibly utilize internal Ki energy - controversial idea in martial arts community

        Will
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      Answering "Does martial arts work?"
      This guy is my new hero. He hits it right on the head.
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        Andy [218075,Michael], great video and excellent explanation, I mostly agree in the respect that there are some practitioners (and I don't mean this in a derogatory manner it is just a fact of life) that are not physically or mentally cut out for fighting, they only attend class a couple of times a week, don't actively condition or seek out the depth/source of the principles of application for which their respective MA were originally developed. Where I disagree (and it is nitpicking really not a major disagreement) is that I still believe that ANY amount of MA training will (or should) make an individual more able to defend themselves than would have been the case had they had no MA training at all. Even the basic blocks we learn from day one as a shiny new white belt have the potential to stop or redirect a fist from the face and my contention is that just by knowing that basic block you are now better able to defend yourself (even if you are not or ever going to be in a position to take out Mike Tyson).
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        Andrew Doran Depends what you mean by work. Years ago I was teaching a youth martial arts class. When a woman entered my dojo and said my son was diagnosed with a.d.d.. Do you think this class would help my son. I stated....I didn't know; try the class for two or three weeks an see if there is a change. I won't charge for the class; in two or three weeks if there is an improvement we'll go from there. Time past an in three weeks the mom came in before class started.. She gave me a big hug an said the class had helped her son so much.. She said he's more focused an concentrates more with no problems in school.......She had tears in her eyes an a smile on her face...
        Does martial arts work.......Yes...For all the right reasons
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        Christopher Adamchek Well said
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      What kind of martial arts teacher are you ?
      Those who teach may or may not be involved in the class. Some are strictly observers who sit and never move a mussle, and others walk around, moving, and demonstrate techniques. Neverless, students are urging for reinforcements from the teacher. What kind of teacher are you ?
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        Andy One who does not know everything (even though I may sometimes sound like I think I do 😆) I know I still have more to learn than I have to pass on but I do share and pass on all that I can which is all any of us can hope to do.
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        Christopher Adamchek The kind that my students need
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        Al W I first demonstrate the technique I ask the student to perform. Then I step back and observe, if a student is struggling or has asked for help I then provide help and guidance.
        For white belts I tend to get them performing the technique on the spot to ensure that they get the basics of the technique right before I get them to march up and down the dojo in stance
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      Old Belts
      Looking for creative ways to present/save my old belts. I don't need more stuff laying around the house. If I made a nice display with little plaques on the award date would anyone be interested? Not a pitch, just wondering how others deal with this issue.
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        Ray Honestly. My old belts are either on my kids. Or one of my students.
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        Rachel DS I have kept all mine with the exception of my white belt as when I got that it was just with my first dogi and not an actual rank in that style. I have the belt and stripe I got in goju for 10th and 9th and my yellow belt in UGR for 6th kyu but I graded for 7th kyu at the same time so I never got a white belt and stripe. I gave my white belt to a new starter I have been teaching. My purple belt has some pretty special memories and my daughter wants it when she is awarded hers. I have promised she can when and if she gets to 4th kyu (she is junior 6th so it's a way off yet). I think perhaps when I get my shodan I might work out a better way to store them than rolled up on a coathanger in the wardrobe. TBH I am not really a belt person....it's more of an inward journey....the belts I guess are outward reminders (more for others to see where you are up to....but the people that matter will be able to get that when they see you train anyway!)
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        Christopher Adamchek i have yet to display mine :'(
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      What Does Toughen-Up Your Karate Really Mean !
      You have to toughen-up your karate ! sensei's always remark. What's the deal about being tough, when I can kill with karate weapons. Why drill, drill, drill over, and over. I feel the sensei is malicious. We can exercise at home instead of the dojo. He must not trust us. We enjoy the katas, kumite, and hitting the bags etc. What does it mean to toughen-up your karate !
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        PAUL (paldo) REYNOLDS O.K, since theres not to much response to the thread. I'll give you what I think it should be in answering What Does Toughen-Up Your Karate Really Mean ! " Prepare For Battle " ! Strive for perfection with greater effort and maximumdesire. Putting your soul into the entire practice without let-up. Forcing yourself to do more and be satisfied in its performances. Having reached the highest intensity ever marked before, and finally knowing within yourself that you really performed to a higher level ! Then you can face the enemy !
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        Richie I think it means to just do. It is to throw every strike with attention, every sit up to completion, and every kata with focus. I see kids get their rank and when do the low grade katas and kihon do it half-ass. With my view of the mind tells the body what to do, I feel it is a mental attitude that I will do what I set out to do, OR change the train of thought to be more focused.
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        Christopher Adamchek not everyone is good at pushing themselves, sometimes you need a good sensei who's going to push you further

        To ask for a 110% when you're already giving a 100% because maybe, just maybe you'll reach a 101%
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      What does wearing a 'Gi' mean personally
      I understand there are numerous Gi designs on the market,but what does it mean to wear one.
      Is it for comfort,protection or a uniform one wears to practice Karate.I prefer wearing a Gi for training outside of the dojo,as well as inside,for the simple reason that to me it embodies what I believe is the essence of Karate,the spirit of what we believe in.
      Interesting to hear other thoughts on the subject
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        David Ianetta I agree totally to [199522,PAUL (paldo) REYNOLDS] . I feel wearing a dobok is one way I feel connected to other practitioners of taekwondo and its history. It's part of the traditions I love. Our school allows students to also wear a school t-shirt, but I guess I'm bit of a traditionalist, it just doesn't look right to me. I don't wear mine when I practice at home, however simply because I do work out in the back yard and grass stains are tough to get out.
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        Rachel DS I train in mine 4 times a week (I have 3 I use regularly so that works ok). The only sessions I don't wear a dogi is the plain clothes SD training sessions....although I nearly had to wear a gi last time as I was going to have to help teach. I don't train in a dogi at home as I don't feel the need to when I am by myself, the dojo is more in my head IYKWIM. When I train in the park I usually wear my club tshirt / tank or some other karate top (I have a good collection now) and shorts / training pants because getting grass stains off a white dogi is a pain and also I think people stare at us anyway without attracting further attention. Some of the comments we get are bordering on disrespectful to both me and my instructor.....though I generally just ignore it because it's my absolute favourite and most useful session in the week....especially since I spend a good deal of the regular sessions teaching / helping my kohai (a different sort of training for me, still good) and the sessions in the park are longer and focused on me (and or the head student), our kata and training things more toward / beyond shodan. [171807,Andy] though one thing is certain....I don't train in a tutu....and I have ripped a work skirt trying to do a kata while my lunch was heating up in the microwave.....
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        Ray I train with and without. It makes no difference to me. Of course it make my students feel like a team when they all wear their gis and red t shirts. It is not required of course some of our students can not afford a gi. If I know a student can not afford one we often remove the tops and go belt less during training. it humbles the higher belts, and reminds the lower belts that the color is just a color.
      • 12 more comments




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